1. Astrophysicist Neil deGrasse Tyson shares some of the big questions  astronomers are working to answer:


We can measure the influence of this thing we call dark energy which is forcing an acceleration of the expanding universe. We don’t know what that is, we don’t know anything about it, other than what it’s doing to the universe.
Then 85 percent of the gravity of the universe has a point of origin about which we know nothing. We account for all the matter and energy that we’re familiar with, measure up how much gravity it should have, it’s about one-sixth of the gravity that’s actually operating on the universe. We call that dark matter, but what we should call it is “dark gravity.” We don’t know what that is either.
We don’t know how [Earth] went from inanimate organic molecules to self-replicating life. We got top people working on that as well.
We don’t know what was around before the universe. We don’t know what is at the center of a black hole. We don’t know whether or not the universe is actually one of many in a multiverse. We want to know if there’s life thriving in under ice oceans of Jupiter’s moon Europa.
… But my favorite question is one that we don’t even know to ask yet because it’s a question that would arise upon answering these questions I just delivered to you. … If you’re a scientist and you have to have an answer, even in the absence of data, you’re not going to be a good scientist.


photo via NASA View in High-Res

    Astrophysicist Neil deGrasse Tyson shares some of the big questions  astronomers are working to answer:

    We can measure the influence of this thing we call dark energy which is forcing an acceleration of the expanding universe. We don’t know what that is, we don’t know anything about it, other than what it’s doing to the universe.

    Then 85 percent of the gravity of the universe has a point of origin about which we know nothing. We account for all the matter and energy that we’re familiar with, measure up how much gravity it should have, it’s about one-sixth of the gravity that’s actually operating on the universe. We call that dark matter, but what we should call it is “dark gravity.” We don’t know what that is either.

    We don’t know how [Earth] went from inanimate organic molecules to self-replicating life. We got top people working on that as well.

    We don’t know what was around before the universe. We don’t know what is at the center of a black hole. We don’t know whether or not the universe is actually one of many in a multiverse. We want to know if there’s life thriving in under ice oceans of Jupiter’s moon Europa.

    … But my favorite question is one that we don’t even know to ask yet because it’s a question that would arise upon answering these questions I just delivered to you. … If you’re a scientist and you have to have an answer, even in the absence of data, you’re not going to be a good scientist.

    photo via NASA

  2. neil degrasse tyson

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  1. Posted on 26 February, 2014

    13,782 notes | Permalink

    Reblogged from josiefeeniee

    OK, but this tho. 

(Bill Nye and Neil deGrasse Tyson) View in High-Res

    OK, but this tho.

    (Bill Nye and Neil deGrasse Tyson)

  2. bill nye the science guy

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  1. Astrophysicist Neil deGrasse Tyson will host a 13-part series on Fox called Cosmos : A Spacetime Odyssey, recalling Carl Sagan’s 1980 series about the wonders of the universe. Tomorrow we’ll talk about space exploration, the search for extraterrestrial intelligence, the unsolved mysteries of the universe, and Tyson’s remarkable career.

photo of Tyson from The Cosmos trailer via geeksofdoom View in High-Res

    Astrophysicist Neil deGrasse Tyson will host a 13-part series on Fox called Cosmos : A Spacetime Odyssey, recalling Carl Sagan’s 1980 series about the wonders of the universe. Tomorrow we’ll talk about space exploration, the search for extraterrestrial intelligence, the unsolved mysteries of the universe, and Tyson’s remarkable career.

    photo of Tyson from The Cosmos trailer via geeksofdoom

  2. the cosmos

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  1. via Astronomy Picture of the Day

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  1. At this point, I think there’s been a paper averaging almost every day for the past 12 years with theorists of physics trying out different ideas for what could be the explanation. If you ask almost any of them, ‘Do you stand behind your theory? Is this the answer?’ I think almost every one would say, ‘No, no no. I’m just trying to expand the range of possibilities.’ We really don’t know what’s going on.

    — A Nobel Prize-winning physicist says if you’re puzzled by what dark energy is, you’re in good company

  2. physics

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    saul perlmutter

  1. From our point of view, the most exciting thing would be if we discovered something really fundamental in our understanding was just off a bit — and that now we have a chance to revisit it. That would be our favorite thing, if we could take a whole new crack at the problem — and a new way of understanding it. In physics, it seems like whenever we get a completely new understanding … it somehow subsumes the previous understandings and it … adds an extra level of sophistication.

    — Saul Perlmutter, on his (shared) discovery that the universe’s expansion is speeding up and not slowing down, as previously thought. 

  2. saul perlmutter

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  1. Posted on 11 November, 2011

    368 notes | Permalink

    Reblogged from cvltic

    Monday: a discussion about dark matter, expanding universes, physics, and more with physicist Saul Perlmutter. You might have heard the name. He just shared the Nobel Prize in Physics. (pic via hier0glyphs/NASA) View in High-Res

    Monday: a discussion about dark matter, expanding universes, physics, and more with physicist Saul Perlmutter. You might have heard the name. He just shared the Nobel Prize in Physics. (pic via hier0glyphs/NASA)

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  1. Posted on 7 September, 2011

    15,163 notes | Permalink

    Reblogged from jtotheizzoe

    jtotheizzoe:

Humans fire laser to sky, sky laughs, responds with lightning
(They were actually firing a kind of “guide star” that is used to target and correct ground-based telescopes when this shot happened. Nature is still not impressed)
(via Short Sharp Science)
View in High-Res

    jtotheizzoe:

    Humans fire laser to sky, sky laughs, responds with lightning

    (They were actually firing a kind of “guide star” that is used to target and correct ground-based telescopes when this shot happened. Nature is still not impressed)

    (via Short Sharp Science)

  2. science

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  1. 
This stunning 360 degree panorama of the night sky was stitched together from 37,000 images by a first-time astrophotographer.
View in High-Res

    This stunning 360 degree panorama of the night sky was stitched together from 37,000 images by a first-time astrophotographer.


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  1. John Powers reviews Nostalgia for the Light, Patricio Guzman’s tribute to the Atacama Desert — the driest place on Earth, and home to both sophisticated observatories and the sober memories of a military regime’s abuses:  ”Watching Nostalgia for the Light, I suddenly remembered visiting the memorial to the Jewish heroes who fought the Nazis in the Warsaw Ghetto. I was surrounded by an Israeli school group, whose teachers, moved to tears by what struck them as sacred ground, were aghast to see their students giggling, horsing around and flirting — in short, being teenagers. And though my brain sympathized with the adults who honored the memory of those blood-stained cobblestones, my body was on the side of the kids, who were living, breathing, exuberant proof that life goes on.” View in High-Res

    John Powers reviews Nostalgia for the Light, Patricio Guzman’s tribute to the Atacama Desert — the driest place on Earth, and home to both sophisticated observatories and the sober memories of a military regime’s abuses:  Watching Nostalgia for the Light, I suddenly remembered visiting the memorial to the Jewish heroes who fought the Nazis in the Warsaw Ghetto. I was surrounded by an Israeli school group, whose teachers, moved to tears by what struck them as sacred ground, were aghast to see their students giggling, horsing around and flirting — in short, being teenagers. And though my brain sympathized with the adults who honored the memory of those blood-stained cobblestones, my body was on the side of the kids, who were living, breathing, exuberant proof that life goes on.”

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  1. Audio is now up for Dave Davies’ interview with Marc Kaufman about astrobiology and the search for life in the universe. Enjoy!

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    Marc Kaufman

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  1. The International Dark-sky Association has named the English Channel Island of Sark its first dark sky island. View in High-Res

    The International Dark-sky Association has named the English Channel Island of Sark its first dark sky island.

  2. astronomy

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  1. The planet Kepler-10b, seen in this artist’s drawing, is about 1.4 times  the size of earth and is the smallest planet ever discovered outside of  our solar system. View in High-Res

    The planet Kepler-10b, seen in this artist’s drawing, is about 1.4 times the size of earth and is the smallest planet ever discovered outside of our solar system.

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  1. Astronomer Michael Brown explains what happened when he helped demote Pluto from its planetary status: “I got hate mail from kids.” View in High-Res

    Astronomer Michael Brown explains what happened when he helped demote Pluto from its planetary status: “I got hate mail from kids.”

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