1. Paperclip patent. via This Isn’t Happiness  View in High-Res

    Paperclip patent. via This Isn’t Happiness 

  2. art

    invention

    paperclip

  1. Railroad tracks turn into canvases. Via Lost at E Minor View in High-Res

    Railroad tracks turn into canvases. Via Lost at E Minor

  2. train

    art

    music

  1. Art students turn an electrical tower into a stained glass lighthouse. via TIC View in High-Res

    Art students turn an electrical tower into a stained glass lighthouse. via TIC

  2. stained glass

    art

    tower

    photo

  1. Science Fiction star chart via L.A.E.M View in High-Res

    Science Fiction star chart via L.A.E.M

  2. science fiction

    star chart

    poster

    art

  1. 'Atypical' by Pawel Nolbert  View in High-Res

    'Atypical' by Pawel Nolbert 

  2. paint

    art

    pawel nolbert

    purple

  1. Posted on 10 June, 2014

    415 notes | Permalink

    Reblogged from kateoplis

    kateoplis:

    JR at the Panthéon, Paris

    More JR.

  2. pantheon

    art

    JR

    kateoplis

    paris

  1. The Persistence of Memory by Salvador Dalì, 1931 + fat cats
Have a great weekend! 
via Bored Panda View in High-Res

    The Persistence of Memory by Salvador Dalì, 1931 + fat cats

    Have a great weekend! 

    via Bored Panda

  2. art

    salvador dali

    cats

  1. Fresh Air Weekend: Chris O’Dowd, Cannes Film Festival, Degenerate Art

  2. chris o'dowd

    cannes

    world war II

    art

    art history

    interview

  1. What happened to works of art under the Nazis is still very much in the news. One piece of that history is the official Nazi response to Modern Art. They called it degenerate, and put on a number of exhibits to demonstrate how terrible it was. A show at New York’s Neue Galerie  is the first major American exhibit since 1991 to deal with this subject. And Fresh Air’s classical music critic Lloyd Schwartz was there to see it:


One of the most unsettling rooms in an important art exhibit at New York’s Neue Galerie is a room in which numerous empty frames are hanging, with guesses about which paintings might have been in them. The paintings themselves were all lost or destroyed by the Nazis. This is part of a show called “Degenerate Art: The Attack on Modern Art in Nazi Germany, 1937.” Encouraged by Hitler, most Nazis (Goebbels was the rare exception) considered everything but the most hide-bound, traditionally realistic paintings and sculptures to be “degenerate,” a threat to the Aryan ideals of German culture. To bring this home, there was a series of “exhibitions of shame,” designed to teach the German public to despise Modernist art. This culminated in a major show in Munich in 1937, which later toured Germany and Austria. The public crowded to see it. That same summer in Munich, a counter exhibit, called “The Great German Art Exhibition,” including at least one work owned by Hitler, showed what the Nazis thought art should be. The Neue Galerie includes some 80 works from both of these landmark shows. 


Read the full review here. 
Image courtesy of the Neue Galerie  View in High-Res

    What happened to works of art under the Nazis is still very much in the news. One piece of that history is the official Nazi response to Modern Art. They called it degenerate, and put on a number of exhibits to demonstrate how terrible it was. A show at New York’s Neue Galerie  is the first major American exhibit since 1991 to deal with this subject. And Fresh Air’s classical music critic Lloyd Schwartz was there to see it:

    One of the most unsettling rooms in an important art exhibit at New York’s Neue Galerie is a room in which numerous empty frames are hanging, with guesses about which paintings might have been in them. The paintings themselves were all lost or destroyed by the Nazis. This is part of a show called “Degenerate Art: The Attack on Modern Art in Nazi Germany, 1937.” Encouraged by Hitler, most Nazis (Goebbels was the rare exception) considered everything but the most hide-bound, traditionally realistic paintings and sculptures to be “degenerate,” a threat to the Aryan ideals of German culture. To bring this home, there was a series of “exhibitions of shame,” designed to teach the German public to despise Modernist art. This culminated in a major show in Munich in 1937, which later toured Germany and Austria. The public crowded to see it. That same summer in Munich, a counter exhibit, called “The Great German Art Exhibition,” including at least one work owned by Hitler, showed what the Nazis thought art should be. The Neue Galerie includes some 80 works from both of these landmark shows.

    Read the full review here. 

    Image courtesy of the Neue Galerie 

  2. neue galerie

    nazis

    germany

    WWII

    art

    art history

    lloyd schwartz

  1. Posted on 12 May, 2014

    2,548 notes | Permalink

    Reblogged from nyartsmag

    nyartsmag:

Ian Warren, 3 Men, 2007. Installation performance with table, latex, and air, 50 x 80 ft. Courtesy of the artist.
View in High-Res

    nyartsmag:

    Ian Warren, 3 Men, 2007. Installation performance with table, latex, and air, 50 x 80 ft. Courtesy of the artist.

  2. art

    installation

    ladder

    sky

  1. Because, why not?  View in High-Res

    Because, why not? 

  2. architecture

    machine

    art

    graphic

  1. "The universe is under no obligation to make sense to you." - Neil deGrasse Tyson 


Two anonymous art students, who go by the moniker dangerdust, have been creating gorgeous hand-lettered and illustrated chalkboards featuring inspiring quotes from literary and public figures. 
via Colossal
View in High-Res

    "The universe is under no obligation to make sense to you." - Neil deGrasse Tyson 

    Two anonymous art students, who go by the moniker dangerdust, have been creating gorgeous hand-lettered and illustrated chalkboards featuring inspiring quotes from literary and public figures. 

    via Colossal

  2. neil degrasse tyson

    chalkboard

    art

  1. If styles of famous artists became architecture
via Lost at E Minor View in High-Res

    If styles of famous artists became architecture

    via Lost at E Minor

  2. architecture

    art

    christo

    frank stella

  1. Photo break: Imagine if ads were replaced by classical paintings… 
French artist Etienne Lavie tried it.  View in High-Res

    Photo break: Imagine if ads were replaced by classical paintings… 

    French artist Etienne Lavie tried it

  2. art

    paris

    etienne lavie

    metro

    subway

  1. Painting by Jemima Kirke via New York Times

“This is the daughter of a friend of mine. She is 6 years old and was not in the least bit uncomfortable with me painting her. Most kids aren’t, and naturally, they are actually quite bored by the process. But, what was interesting about Sasha is that she actually seemed to understand why I was painting her. She showed up in a beautiful white dress that she picked out herself, and had a lot of say in how she posed for the painting. She even helped me decide which size canvas. We really worked together on this one and took each other seriously. I was interested in her maturity and her poise.” “Sasha,” 2013
View in High-Res

    Painting by Jemima Kirke via New York Times

    “This is the daughter of a friend of mine. She is 6 years old and was not in the least bit uncomfortable with me painting her. Most kids aren’t, and naturally, they are actually quite bored by the process. But, what was interesting about Sasha is that she actually seemed to understand why I was painting her. She showed up in a beautiful white dress that she picked out herself, and had a lot of say in how she posed for the painting. She even helped me decide which size canvas. We really worked together on this one and took each other seriously. I was interested in her maturity and her poise.” “Sasha,” 2013

  2. painting

    jemima kirke

    art

    new york times

    girls