1. Staircase, Prague.
Dennis Fischer via My Modern Met  View in High-Res

    Staircase, Prague.

    Dennis Fischer via My Modern Met 

  2. staircase

    orange

    architecture

    photography

  1. Flatiron in Summer, 1948 View in High-Res

    Flatiron in Summer, 1948

  2. flatiron

    daniel burnham

    architecture

    new york city

  1. Posted on 11 August, 2014

    508 notes | Permalink

    Reblogged from nurnielfa

    Aqueduct of Segovia, Spain 
via Nur Nielfa View in High-Res

    Aqueduct of Segovia, Spain 

    via Nur Nielfa

  2. aqueduct

    spain

    architecture

    roman architecture

  1. Zayed Mosque in Abu Dhabi Photograph by Nawfal Jirjees, My Shot via NatGeo View in High-Res

    Zayed Mosque in Abu Dhabi Photograph by Nawfal Jirjees, My Shot via NatGeo

  2. mosque

    architecture

    abu dhabi

    national geographic

    light

    photography

    travel

  1. © Coco Liu. Illinois, United States. 3rd Place / Architecture. via Colossal View in High-Res

    © Coco Liu. Illinois, United States. 3rd Place / Architecture. via Colossal

  2. chicago

    marina city

    iphone photo

    architecture

  1. 
Peter Steinhauer‘s dazzling photos of monolithic buildings under construction in Hong Kong. In his two Cocoons series, Steinhauer, who lived in Asia for near 20 years, beautifully captured the style of construction that is unique to Hong Kong in which the building is wrapped in silk fabric to prevent debris from falling onto the street and pedestrians below…
No one else anywhere in Asia uses this method of wrapping the buildings in this fashion, and it is understandable how Steinhauer, upon seeing this for the first time, thought it must be an installation by Christo.
View in High-Res

    Peter Steinhauer‘s dazzling photos of monolithic buildings under construction in Hong Kong. In his two Cocoons series, Steinhauer, who lived in Asia for near 20 years, beautifully captured the style of construction that is unique to Hong Kong in which the building is wrapped in silk fabric to prevent debris from falling onto the street and pedestrians below…

    No one else anywhere in Asia uses this method of wrapping the buildings in this fashion, and it is understandable how Steinhauer, upon seeing this for the first time, thought it must be an installation by Christo.

  2. hong kong

    architecture

    green

    christo

    photography

  1. View in High-Res

  2. clouds

    architecture

    sky

  1. Because, why not?  View in High-Res

    Because, why not? 

  2. architecture

    machine

    art

    graphic

  1. If styles of famous artists became architecture
via Lost at E Minor View in High-Res

    If styles of famous artists became architecture

    via Lost at E Minor

  2. architecture

    art

    christo

    frank stella

  1. Louis Kahn by Andreas Levers

    Louis Kahn by Andreas Levers

  2. architecture

    louis kahn

    photography

  1. Spire of Notre Dame by Charles Marville, 1860
via the Metropolitan Museum of Art View in High-Res

    Spire of Notre Dame by Charles Marville, 1860

    via the Metropolitan Museum of Art

  2. notre dame

    architecture

    paris

    19th century

    photography

    MET

  1. Architect and freelance illustrator Maja Wrońska  continues to amaze with her beautifully executed watercolor paintings of iconic cityscapes from around the world.

    via Colossal

  2. watercolors

    architecture

    art

    photo break

    maja wronska

  1. Posted on 26 February, 2014

    1,123 notes | Permalink

    Reblogged from luzfosca

    luzfosca:

Martine Franck
Bibliothèque pour enfants, Clamart, France, 1965
View in High-Res

    luzfosca:

    Martine Franck

    Bibliothèque pour enfants, Clamart, France, 1965

  2. architecture

    children

    spiral

    photography

    black and white

  1. by Michael Salisbury
via gapersblock View in High-Res

    by Michael Salisbury

    via gapersblock

  2. photo break

    architecture

    chicago

    photography

    gapers block

  1. Today journalist  McKenzie Funk  tells Fresh Air about the entrepreneurs looking to cash in on climate change. In the interview he talks about the massive gates designed to protect cities in the event of a large storm surge:

[In the Netherlands] It’s called the Maeslant Storm Surge Barrier (above) and it’s these two Eiffel Tower-sized gates. They swing closed and close the Port of Rotterdam, which is the most important port in all of Europe, it’s where most of the oil and gas come in and it’s where most of everything leaves. They have a huge computer warning system that says, ‘OK, the tides are surging. We need to close the barrier.’ And that actually happened for the second time in history late in 2013, just a few months ago.
… It basically swings closed from both sides and they meet in the middle, these two massive gates and then this piece comes up from below and it closes off the entire harbor — water can’t get in, water can’t get out.
… [The proposed gates to protect Manhattan] would go across the narrows, the area below the Verrazano Bridge. … The storm comes, warning system warns, and the gates swing closed and Manhattan is protected. … We’re talking Statue of Liberty [height] . … Prices are pretty variant at the moment, but [it’s] in the order of $10 billion.




image via MIT View in High-Res

    Today journalist  McKenzie Funk  tells Fresh Air about the entrepreneurs looking to cash in on climate change. In the interview he talks about the massive gates designed to protect cities in the event of a large storm surge:

    [In the Netherlands] It’s called the Maeslant Storm Surge Barrier (above) and it’s these two Eiffel Tower-sized gates. They swing closed and close the Port of Rotterdam, which is the most important port in all of Europe, it’s where most of the oil and gas come in and it’s where most of everything leaves. They have a huge computer warning system that says, ‘OK, the tides are surging. We need to close the barrier.’ And that actually happened for the second time in history late in 2013, just a few months ago.

    … It basically swings closed from both sides and they meet in the middle, these two massive gates and then this piece comes up from below and it closes off the entire harbor — water can’t get in, water can’t get out.

    … [The proposed gates to protect Manhattan] would go across the narrows, the area below the Verrazano Bridge. … The storm comes, warning system warns, and the gates swing closed and Manhattan is protected. … We’re talking Statue of Liberty [height] . … Prices are pretty variant at the moment, but [it’s] in the order of $10 billion.

    image via MIT

  2. fresh air

    climate change

    storm surge

    mckenzie funk

    holland

    manhattan

    ocean

    architecture