1. As a veterinarian who specializes in behavioral medicine, Dr. Vint Virga has treated many household pets in his clinic. But for the past five years he has been working mostly with leopards, wolves, bears, zebras and other animals living in zoos and wildlife parks. He deals with such issues as appetites, anxiety and obsessive behavior.
In the interview he discusses how zoos have changed to improve the animals’ well being:

"I think the most important things that zoos have done in the past 10, 20 years, is that they [have] focused primarily on the animal’s well-being. And, depending on their feedback and responses, looked at their behavior, looked at their overall happiness and contentment and used that as the gauge for what to do for the animal.
They’ve also applied as much [as] science knows about the animals in nature. What that looks like is providing them with a space that’s a lot more rich and full than just a place that is an exhibit. So it’s really shifting from not a cage, because most zoos don’t even have those anymore, but from an exhibit to a habitat. The environment is much richer and more complex rather than flat and uniform, so that we can see them.
[Zoos are] providing [animals with] opportunities to escape from view of the public — and that can be difficult for a zoo. … Visitors complain to the zoo if they can’t see the leopard, the bear or the lion. But on the other hand, if the lion doesn’t have any choice of getting away from the public at times, particularly if there [are] crowds or noisy visitors, then we’re taking away their sense of control over their environment.”
View in High-Res

    As a veterinarian who specializes in behavioral medicine, Dr. Vint Virga has treated many household pets in his clinic. But for the past five years he has been working mostly with leopards, wolves, bears, zebras and other animals living in zoos and wildlife parks. He deals with such issues as appetites, anxiety and obsessive behavior.

    In the interview he discusses how zoos have changed to improve the animals’ well being:

    "I think the most important things that zoos have done in the past 10, 20 years, is that they [have] focused primarily on the animal’s well-being. And, depending on their feedback and responses, looked at their behavior, looked at their overall happiness and contentment and used that as the gauge for what to do for the animal.

    They’ve also applied as much [as] science knows about the animals in nature. What that looks like is providing them with a space that’s a lot more rich and full than just a place that is an exhibit. So it’s really shifting from not a cage, because most zoos don’t even have those anymore, but from an exhibit to a habitat. The environment is much richer and more complex rather than flat and uniform, so that we can see them.

    [Zoos are] providing [animals with] opportunities to escape from view of the public — and that can be difficult for a zoo. … Visitors complain to the zoo if they can’t see the leopard, the bear or the lion. But on the other hand, if the lion doesn’t have any choice of getting away from the public at times, particularly if there [are] crowds or noisy visitors, then we’re taking away their sense of control over their environment.”

  2. animals

    zoo

    polar bear

    vint virga

    fresh air

    interview

  1. Photographers Clarisse Rebotier and Thomas Subtil imagine an even wilder Paris Metro, roaming with animals from the savanna.
via Atlantic Cities View in High-Res

    Photographers Clarisse Rebotier and Thomas Subtil imagine an even wilder Paris Metro, roaming with animals from the savanna.

    via Atlantic Cities

  2. giraffe

    animals

    metro

    photography

  1. Posted on 17 March, 2014

    1,927 notes | Permalink

    Reblogged from luzfosca

    luzfosca:

Dr. Otto Bettmann
3rd Street, Manhattan, NYC, 1968.

    luzfosca:

    Dr. Otto Bettmann

    3rd Street, Manhattan, NYC, 1968.

  2. otto bettmann

    manhattan

    animals

    photography

  1. Posted on 15 November, 2012

    1,874 notes | Permalink

    Reblogged from archiemcphee

    wired:

    archiemcphee:

    It’s time for another visit to the Department of Awesome Natural Wonders. These pretty amphibians with perfectly transparent underbellies are called Glass frogs. They live in the cloud forests of South america, are one of the relatively small number of species where the fathers exclusively care for the young, and scientists are still trying to figure out why they evolved to have transparent tummies.

    Complete transparency has evolved multiple independent times. This suggests that a translucent underbelly provides some evolutionary advantage. Juan Manuel Guayasamin, an evolutionary biologist who studies glassfrogs extensively as a researcher at Universidad Tecnológica Indoamérica’s Center for Research on Biodiversity and Climate Change, explains:

    “Most frogs are not transparent because this would expose organs to the deleterious effects of sunlight and heat.” But in transparent glassfrogs, key organs like the liver and digestive tract are covered by a thin layer of light-reflecting organelles called iridiphores. These iridescent cellular subunits may provide a layer of protection from heat and sunlight, a feature that Guayasamin says could give glassfrogs the ability to optimize their internal homeostasis by simply moving about, “covering each organ at a time, as opposed to the entire body cavity.” 

    Guayasamin says another hypothesis holds that transparency evolved to help glassfrogs avoid predators (an ability commonly referred to as “crypsis”). ”Most glassfrogs are green and reflect light almost as a leaf. For predators (and amphibiologists), it is quite difficult to find a glassfrog if it is not, for example, calling.”

    You can even see their hearts beating inside their bodies. That’s pretty awesome.

    Top photo by Heidi & Hans-Jurgen Koch, via National Geographic, bottom photo by Martín Bustamante.

    [via Neatorama and io9]

    We see right through you, little glass frogs.

  2. animals

    nature

  1. Posted on 15 November, 2012

    1,225 notes | Permalink

    Reblogged from explore-blog

    explore-blog:

Animal Cheat Sheet – a visual guide to spotting the differences between frequently confused animal species. From the genius who brought us this illustrated guide to animals with misleading names.
(↬ It’s Okay To Be Smart)

Print this out. Keep it in your wallet. Be prepared to tell the difference between a dolphin and porpoise. View in High-Res

    explore-blog:

    Animal Cheat Sheet – a visual guide to spotting the differences between frequently confused animal species. From the genius who brought us this illustrated guide to animals with misleading names.

    ( It’s Okay To Be Smart)

    Print this out. Keep it in your wallet. Be prepared to tell the difference between a dolphin and porpoise.

  2. animals

    cheatsheets

  1. npr:

    thefluffingtonpost:

    Meet Trotter, the Most Fashionable Pup on Instagram

    Treat yourself! — tanya  b.

    Your Wednesday pick-me-up, for a more efficient, productive afternoon and of course, more Halloween costume ideas.

  2. Halloween

    animals

  1. Posted on 22 June, 2012

    943 notes | Permalink

    Reblogged from notesondesign

    heidisaman:

It’s Friday.  You made it! Let’s celebrate.

Every Animal Story on Fresh Air from 2009-2012

    heidisaman:

    It’s Friday.  You made it! Let’s celebrate.

    Every Animal Story on Fresh Air from 2009-2012

    (Source: notesondesign)

  2. friday happiness photo

    dogs

    animals

  1. bathtubginrummy:

    When Scientists Get Accidentally Artsy

    Smithsonian museum specialist Sandra Raredon has been making radiographs, or X-ray images, for some 25 years. And although she doesn’t necessarily consider herself an artist, per se, she’s not surprised to see her work on display in that context. “I wanted people to see that they’re not only scientific, but they’re beautiful as well,” she says on the phone.

  2. x-ray

    art

    animals

  1. nprradiopictures:

    (Joel Sartore/National Geographic)

    For Joel Sartore, it’s a race against the clock to photograph as many animals as he can — before it’s too late. Check out more of his photos and listen to the story at The Picture Show.

    -Emily

  2. photography

    animals

    endangered animals

    joel sartore

    national geographic

  1. Posted on 8 November, 2011

    298 notes | Permalink

    Reblogged from mysticbird

    How Dogs Evolved Into Our Best Friends: “There’s  something about them that makes us friends with them. There are people  who dislike dogs for sure. But dogs also have an uncanny ability … to  walk in a room and pick out the one or two who seem to dislike dogs the  most and make friends with them. It’s happened to me with some of my  dogs on numerous occasions. I think there’s a deep — some people call it  love, I call it a ‘deep empathy’ between these two species — that  resonates with each other in a way that makes them comprehensible to  each other even though they don’t speak the same language.” View in High-Res

    How Dogs Evolved Into Our Best Friends: “There’s something about them that makes us friends with them. There are people who dislike dogs for sure. But dogs also have an uncanny ability … to walk in a room and pick out the one or two who seem to dislike dogs the most and make friends with them. It’s happened to me with some of my dogs on numerous occasions. I think there’s a deep — some people call it love, I call it a ‘deep empathy’ between these two species — that resonates with each other in a way that makes them comprehensible to each other even though they don’t speak the same language.”

  2. dog

    dogs

    dogs!

    animals

    mark derr

  1. Tomorrow: the history of dogs in the Americas.


fun girl (by saikiishiki)

    Tomorrow: the history of dogs in the Americas.

    fun girl (by saikiishiki)

  2. dog

    animals

  1. Happy Weekend! See you Monday!

Yawning koala bear (by National Media Museum)

    Happy Weekend! See you Monday!

    Yawning koala bear (by National Media Museum)

  2. koala bear

    yawning

    animals

    tgif

  1. Gives one reason to paws. (Happy weekend!)

  2. npr

    trivia

    facts

    animals

    dogs

    theft

    news

    weekend edition

  1. Dogs On Fresh Air:

    The New Science of Understanding Dog Behavior

    Helping Your Dog Navigate Aging

    Triumph, The Insult Comic Dog

    America Is Going To The Dogs

    The Road To Recovery For Michael Vick’s Dogs

    Putting Puppies Behind Bars (For A Good Cause)

    Temple Grandin On ‘The Best Life For Animals’

    Making Stars Out Of Pound Pups

  2. dog

    animals

  1. Posted on 1 September, 2011

    1,648 notes | Permalink

    Reblogged from atomos

    tballardbrown:

101 ways to use a cat: Bookmark (by roxeteer)

Purrfect.

    tballardbrown:

    101 ways to use a cat: Bookmark (by roxeteer)

    Purrfect.

  2. animals

    books

    lit

    cats