1. Tomorrow actor Jared Leto (left) joins us to talk about playing a transsexual woman during the ’80s AIDS crisis in the film Dallas Buyers Club.
Leto, on the gamble of making smaller, independent films: 

Sometimes [little films] don’t work, they don’t come together, and of course they don’t have the support or they don’t find an audience. It’s a beautiful thing to work with people who are willing to risk it all and I felt that way a few times in my career and certainly felt that way on Dallas Buyers Club.
View in High-Res

    Tomorrow actor Jared Leto (left) joins us to talk about playing a transsexual woman during the ’80s AIDS crisis in the film Dallas Buyers Club.

    Leto, on the gamble of making smaller, independent films:

    Sometimes [little films] don’t work, they don’t come together, and of course they don’t have the support or they don’t find an audience. It’s a beautiful thing to work with people who are willing to risk it all and I felt that way a few times in my career and certainly felt that way on Dallas Buyers Club.

  2. fresh air

    interview

    jared leto

    dallas buyerse club

    independent films

    AIDS

  1. Alabama is one of 33 states that mandates HIV education in high schools. Among those states, students receive an average of 2.2 hours of education, and most focus on abstinence. [AIDS in Black America: A Public Health Crisis] View in High-Res

    Alabama is one of 33 states that mandates HIV education in high schools. Among those states, students receive an average of 2.2 hours of education, and most focus on abstinence. [AIDS in Black America: A Public Health Crisis]

  2. hiv

    aids

    education

    public health

  1. When I started doing this work in 1986, roughly 20 percent of all of the people in the United States who were living with AIDS were African-American. The most recent statistics from the Center for Disease Control indicate that 45 percent of all the new cases of HIV infection are amongst African-Americans. … If we continue on the current trend, in the year 2015, especially in the South, it will probably be the case that 5 to 6 percent of all African-American adults who are sexually active will be infected with the virus.

    — Dr. Robert Fullilove, on today’s Fresh Air about AIDS in the African-American community.

  2. aids

    hiv

    robert fullilove

    public health

    race

  1. Of the more than 1 million people in the U.S. infected with HIV, nearly half are black men, women and children — even though blacks make up about 13 percent of the population. AIDS is the primary killer of African-Americans ages 19 to 44, and the mortality rate is 10 times higher for black Americans than for whites.

    — AIDS in Black America: A Public Health Crisis

  2. aids

    public health

    race

  1. AIDS is now the leading cause of death for African-American women between the ages of 25 and 34 and the primary killer for all African Americans in the 19-44 age group.

    — Robert Fullilove, guest on today’s show.

    (Source: mailman.columbia.edu)

  2. robert fullilove

    public health

    aids

    race

    african-american

  1. Every nine and a half minutes, somewhere in America, someone is infected with HIV. Half of them are black.

    — Today: why AIDS/HIV is so much worse in the black community. [Get tested]

  2. aids

    public health

    race

    frontline

  1. Thursday: A discussion about AIDS and the African-American community.
Above: Philly AIDS/HIV cases by zip code (2010) [more on Philadelphia and HIV/AIDS testing]
[Find a testing site near you.]

    Thursday: A discussion about AIDS and the African-American community.

    Above: Philly AIDS/HIV cases by zip code (2010) [more on Philadelphia and HIV/AIDS testing]

    [Find a testing site near you.]

  2. aids

    hiv

    public health

    philadelphia

    race

  1. by looking at the pace with which viruses evolved, you can reverse engineer your way back into a date range. … Research suggests that the key year was around 1908, but the range is a bit wider – 1884 to 1924. Somewhere in there, the first HIV is loose in the world, has come out of the chimp population and is infecting humans.

    — On today’s Fresh Air, the history of the HIV virus.

  2. hiv

    aids

    tinderbox

  1. The ability for a society to grasp the connection between sexual culture and the spread of this epidemic is just essential to reversing it. And it seems like the more the United States or other Western nations get involved, the farther societies get away from that kind of moment of reckoning.

    — On today’s Fresh Air, how international AIDS organizations working in Africa went off in the wrong direction in fighting the spread of HIV across the continent.

  2. hiv

    africa

    aids

    craig timberg

    tinderbox

    public health

  1. The difference between the men who were circumcised and the men who weren’t was 8 to 1 in terms of their infectiousness.

    — 

    Monday: Journalist Craig Timberg says that for years, international AIDS groups overlooked important factors in the spread of the HIV virus, such as the effectiveness of circumcision. Timberg, the former Johannesburg bureau chief for The Washington Post, explores the history of the HIV virus and the efforts to fight the AIDS epidemic in his book Tinderbox: How the West Sparked the AIDS Epidemic and how the World Can Finally Overcome It.

  2. Craig Timberg

    aids

    hiv

    epidemic

    tinderbox

  1. Some Interviews Over The Years From Fresh Air
Remembering AIDS Activist Martin Delaney
Fighting Pediatric AIDS
Radical ‘Wisdom’ for the Global AIDS Epidemic
Championing The Caregiver’s Cause
Remembering AIDS Activist Rodger McFarlane
AIDS in Asia
Elizabeth Taylor’s Legacy: AIDS Activist, Movie Star
The Man Who Tracks Viruses Before They Spread
The Orphan Project: Families and Children in the HIV Epidemic (note: RealPlayer only)
Saving the Heart of the Crescent City

    Some Interviews Over The Years From Fresh Air

  2. world aids day

    aids

    hiv

  1. Seeing so many friends who were truly young and friends of friends — you know, I’m a gay guy, living in New York City during the ’80s and ’90s during the height of the pandemic — it was like living in wartime but a very specific kind of war … it [affected] a very limited sector of the population and there were other people beside you everywhere who were not fighting it, who were not even conscious of it. It was very strange to feel so in the trenches and to be going from hospital to hospital — more than one a day sometimes — to visit people who were dying. It did cross my mind that my fervent will to live — and it is fervent, and it is still in operation, and it is still, in fact, the area of my life of which I’m most optimistic, and I think that people really do tend to be hugely optimistic about their own chances of survival going from day to day — but it did cross my mind and it remains in my mind that all of the people that I know who did die, they didn’t die because they want to live less than I do. They didn’t die because their desire to continue existing was found wanting in ways that my own is somehow better. And that is tremendously instructive to me.

    — David Rakoff in an interview on Fresh Air with Terry Gross, on seeing his young friends die from AIDS in the 1980s.

  2. david rakoff

    aids

    fresh air

    terry gross

    npr