1. Tomorrow we’re recording with Jenny Slate (right) and director Gillian Robespierre to talk about their new film Obvious Child. The film is about a aspiring stand-up comic Donna (Slate) who, after a drunken one-night-stand, gets pregnant and has an abortion. To read more about the movie, here’s our film critic David Edelstein’s take. 

You might also know Jenny Slate from Parks and Recreation (Mona-Lisa Saperstein, sister of Jean Ralphio), Kroll Show (PubLIZity) or her internet sensation, Marcel the Shell with Shoes On.  View in High-Res

    Tomorrow we’re recording with Jenny Slate (right) and director Gillian Robespierre to talk about their new film Obvious Child. The film is about a aspiring stand-up comic Donna (Slate) who, after a drunken one-night-stand, gets pregnant and has an abortion. To read more about the movie, here’s our film critic David Edelstein’s take

    You might also know Jenny Slate from Parks and Recreation (Mona-Lisa Saperstein, sister of Jean Ralphio), Kroll Show (PubLIZity) or her internet sensation, Marcel the Shell with Shoes On

  2. jenny slate

    obvious child

    gillian robespierre

    abortion

    comedy

    film

    interview

    fresh air

    terry gross

    parks and recreation

  1. Obvious Child centers on Donna Stern, played by Jenny Slate, an aspiring stand-up comic in her late 20s who’s out of her depth in the grown-up world. After getting smashed and having unprotected sex with a guy she barely knows, Donna discovers she’s pregnant and decides to have an abortion. 
Fresh Air film critic David Edelstein reviews: 

Donna feels so real she could be sitting next to you in the theater. Jenny Slate can be seen opposite Nick Kroll in drag on the Kroll Show in a weekly reality-TV send-up called Publizity about two jittery L.A. publicists named Liz. She’s even more famous for blowing her Saturday Night Live debut several years ago by blurting the f-word on live TV. I found that rather endearing and hoped Slate would get her own show. She didn’t—she barely lasted out the year. But what I love about her in Obvious Child is that sense of danger she brings. She’s all frizzy little coils of neurotic energy. Anything could pop out of her mouth.
That fits a character who has no self-control. She’s a big baby, someone who can’t take care of herself, let alone a little baby. Director Gillian Robespierre lets you take Donna as you will. Robespierre has the courage of her ambivalence. The best thing about Obvious Child is that there’s nothing obvious about it.
View in High-Res

    Obvious Child centers on Donna Stern, played by Jenny Slate, an aspiring stand-up comic in her late 20s who’s out of her depth in the grown-up world. After getting smashed and having unprotected sex with a guy she barely knows, Donna discovers she’s pregnant and decides to have an abortion. 

    Fresh Air film critic David Edelstein reviews: 

    Donna feels so real she could be sitting next to you in the theater. Jenny Slate can be seen opposite Nick Kroll in drag on the Kroll Show in a weekly reality-TV send-up called Publizity about two jittery L.A. publicists named Liz. She’s even more famous for blowing her Saturday Night Live debut several years ago by blurting the f-word on live TV. I found that rather endearing and hoped Slate would get her own show. She didn’t—she barely lasted out the year. But what I love about her in Obvious Child is that sense of danger she brings. She’s all frizzy little coils of neurotic energy. Anything could pop out of her mouth.

    That fits a character who has no self-control. She’s a big baby, someone who can’t take care of herself, let alone a little baby. Director Gillian Robespierre lets you take Donna as you will. Robespierre has the courage of her ambivalence. The best thing about Obvious Child is that there’s nothing obvious about it.

  2. obvious child

    abortion

    film

    comedy

    jenny slate

    david edelstein

  1. Yesterday Texas Senator Wendy Davis (D-Fort Worth) filibustered a Republican bill outlawing most abortions in the state long enough to help block the bill. That meant standing for nearly 11 hours. The clock ultimately ran out on the bill, the vote occurring after midnight as is constitutionally mandated in the state.
For some background on the abortion debate in Texas (and nationwide), an interview with Texas Observer writer Carolyn Jones about her own abortion and the state’s controversial sonogram law.
And an interview with Carolyn Cline, executive director and CEO of Involved for Life, and an anti-abortion advocate and proponent of pregnancy centers in Texas.
Image of Texas Sen. Wendy Davis’ pink sneakers as she filibustered the abortion bill yesterday in the Texas State House via The Washington Post View in High-Res

    Yesterday Texas Senator Wendy Davis (D-Fort Worth) filibustered a Republican bill outlawing most abortions in the state long enough to help block the bill. That meant standing for nearly 11 hours. The clock ultimately ran out on the bill, the vote occurring after midnight as is constitutionally mandated in the state.

    For some background on the abortion debate in Texas (and nationwide), an interview with Texas Observer writer Carolyn Jones about her own abortion and the state’s controversial sonogram law.

    And an interview with Carolyn Cline, executive director and CEO of Involved for Life, and an anti-abortion advocate and proponent of pregnancy centers in Texas.

    Image of Texas Sen. Wendy Davis’ pink sneakers as she filibustered the abortion bill yesterday in the Texas State House via The Washington Post

  2. Fresh Air

    Interviews

    Abortion

    carolyn jones

    Texas

    Sen. Wendy Davis

    Roe v. Wade

  1. Journalist Carolyn Jones, who has written about her personal experience with the Texas sonogram law for The Texas Observer, talks with Terry Gross about whether a state-required script detailing the abortion procedure impacted her decision to have an abortion:




It had no impact on my decision to go ahead with the abortion. None, whatsoever. It was a private choice I’d made and I was going to stick with that private choice no matter the people who tried to interfere with me. In terms of my broader frame of mind, it did make me feel very angry — and I still do, I still feel very angry — that someone who had absolutely no say in, you know, my personal decisions could still be there at that moment. The darkest, the darkest day of my life was the day that I found out that information and had to make that decision. That someone could invade upon that — a politician who has absolutely no jurisdiction over my private life, that they could invade upon that and so reduce my dignity — I do feel that that’s an incredible injustice and I still do.”



View in High-Res

    Journalist Carolyn Jones, who has written about her personal experience with the Texas sonogram law for The Texas Observer, talks with Terry Gross about whether a state-required script detailing the abortion procedure impacted her decision to have an abortion:

    It had no impact on my decision to go ahead with the abortion. None, whatsoever. It was a private choice I’d made and I was going to stick with that private choice no matter the people who tried to interfere with me. In terms of my broader frame of mind, it did make me feel very angry — and I still do, I still feel very angry — that someone who had absolutely no say in, you know, my personal decisions could still be there at that moment. The darkest, the darkest day of my life was the day that I found out that information and had to make that decision. That someone could invade upon that — a politician who has absolutely no jurisdiction over my private life, that they could invade upon that and so reduce my dignity — I do feel that that’s an incredible injustice and I still do.”

  2. Fresh Air

    Interviews

    Carolyn Jones

    abortion

    Texas

    Roe v. Wade

  1. “I am so sorry,” the young woman said with compassion, and nudged the tissues closer. Then, after a moment’s pause, she told me reluctantly about the new Texas sonogram law that had just come into effect. I’d already heard about it. The law passed last spring but had been suppressed by legal injunction until two weeks earlier.

    My counselor said that the law required me to have another ultrasound that day, and that I was legally obligated to hear a doctor describe my baby. I’d then have to wait 24 hours before coming back for the procedure. She said that I could either see the sonogram or listen to the baby’s heartbeat, adding weakly that this choice was mine.

    “I don’t want to have to do this at all,” I told her. “I’m doing this to prevent my baby’s suffering. I don’t want another sonogram when I’ve already had two today. I don’t want to hear a description of the life I’m about to end. Please,” I said, “I can’t take any more pain.” I confess that I don’t know why I said that. I knew it was fait accompli. The counselor could no more change the government requirement than I could. Yet here was a superfluous layer of torment piled upon an already horrific day, and I wanted this woman to know it.

    — "We Have No Choice: One Woman’s Ordeal with Texas’ New Sonogram Law" by Carolyn Jones in The Texas Observer. Today marks the 40th anniversary of Roe V. Wade. Jones will be on the show today to talk about her experience and the series of articles she wrote for the Observer about the changing landscape of women’s health and family planning regulation.

  2. Roe v. Wade

    abortion

    Carolyn Jones

    Texas Observer

  1. I feel that so much of the kind of murderous rhetoric of American politics and what we decry as the ‘decline of civility’ or ‘hyperpartisanship’ are really troubling as a citizen to watch. And I do think that even when we’re not talking about abortion, we are talking about abortion.

    — In November, Terry interview The New Yorker's Jill Lepore about the politicization of abortion and birth control, and about the history and future of Planned Parenthood.

  2. abortion

    birth control

  1. People keep writing in to ask for a link to Rick Santorum’s conversation on Fresh Air in 2004 about abortion. Here it is.

  2. rick santorum

    abortion

  1. I really do think that it is the great tragedy of American politics that this issue divides us so profoundly. It’s a very painful issue to talk to just about anybody with, and I think there’s a surprising lack of basic human charity when people talk about this issue, no matter what their position.

    — On today’s Fresh Air, historian Jill Lepore talks about the early history of birth control, and the politics of Planned Parenthood, birth control and abortion.

  2. jill lepore

    abortion

    birth control

    planned parenthood

  1. This conversation came up between Johanna and I. We would often talk at night because that was the only time we had to talk. And she said, ‘Well you can’t ask me that question.’ I said, ‘Why not?’ She said, ‘Well, Walker is Walker. He’s a person. I have a relationship with him. He’s a story. He’s a metaphor. He’s all these different things. Once you have a story, once you have a metaphor, once you have a person, this relationship, you can’t. But when Walker was a fetus, before I knew him, yes, I would have had the abortion.’

    — Ian Brown asked his wife if she would have aborted their son had she known, in advance, what disabilities he would have. This was her response. [full interview with Brown]

  2. ian brown

    walker brown

    the boy in the moon

    abortion

    disability