1. Anthropologists have found cave art in Tennessee that dates from 6,000 years ago making it the oldest in the nation. These “ceremonial drawings” are from the Middle Archaic Period which began in 3788 B.C.Speaking of old cave paintings, we talked to Werner Herzog about his documentary Cave of Forgotten Dreams in which he turns his excellent attention and accent to the Chauvet caves in southern France, dating from 32,000 years ago. Imagine Herzog’s voice:

Since early adolescence, I have been fascinated by cave paintings, It actually was my personal intellectual awakening … and shook me to the core — seeing an image of a horse [from the] prehistoric Stone Age. I couldn’t believe itimage via Huffington Post

And for what it’s worth, John Jeremiah Sullivan's 2011 Paris Review piece about Tennessee’s caves is extraordinary. You can read an excerpt over at Slate. View in High-Res

    Anthropologists have found cave art in Tennessee that dates from 6,000 years ago making it the oldest in the nation. These “ceremonial drawings” are from the Middle Archaic Period which began in 3788 B.C.

    Speaking of old cave paintings, we talked to Werner Herzog about his documentary Cave of Forgotten Dreams in which he turns his excellent attention and accent to the Chauvet caves in southern France, dating from 32,000 years ago. Imagine Herzog’s voice:

    Since early adolescence, I have been fascinated by cave paintings, It actually was my personal intellectual awakening … and shook me to the core — seeing an image of a horse [from the] prehistoric Stone Age. I couldn’t believe it

    image via Huffington Post

    And for what it’s worth, John Jeremiah Sullivan's 2011 Paris Review piece about Tennessee’s caves is extraordinary. You can read an excerpt over at Slate.

  2. Fresh Air

    interviews

    werner herzog

    cave art

    the cave of forgotten dreams

  1. In 2007, filmmaker Werner Herzog dedicated his documentary Encounters at the End of the Worldto Roger Ebert. At one point during Herzog’s commentary track, he calls Ebert “a warrior of the cinema.” Ebert responded to the compliment in a letter to Herzog.
My favorite part of Ebert’s letter:

I believe you have never made a film depending on sex, violence or chase scenes…You have avoided this content, I suspect, because it lends itself so seductively to formulas, and you want every film to be absolutely original.
You have also avoided all “obligatory scenes,” including artificial happy endings… And you don’t use musical scores that tell us how to feel about the content. Instead, you prefer free-standing music that evokes a mood: You use classical music, opera, oratorios, requiems, aboriginal music, the sounds of the sea, bird cries, and of course Popol Vuh.
All of these decisions proceed from your belief that the audience must be able to believe what it sees. Not its “truth,” but its actuality, its ecstatic truth.

You can read all of Ebert’s letter to Herzog here.
- Heidi
Still from Encounters at the End of the World
(via cinephilearchive) View in High-Res

    In 2007, filmmaker Werner Herzog dedicated his documentary Encounters at the End of the Worldto Roger Ebert. At one point during Herzog’s commentary track, he calls Ebert “a warrior of the cinema.” Ebert responded to the compliment in a letter to Herzog.

    My favorite part of Ebert’s letter:

    I believe you have never made a film depending on sex, violence or chase scenes…You have avoided this content, I suspect, because it lends itself so seductively to formulas, and you want every film to be absolutely original.

    You have also avoided all “obligatory scenes,” including artificial happy endings… And you don’t use musical scores that tell us how to feel about the content. Instead, you prefer free-standing music that evokes a mood: You use classical music, opera, oratorios, requiems, aboriginal music, the sounds of the sea, bird cries, and of course Popol Vuh.

    All of these decisions proceed from your belief that the audience must be able to believe what it sees. Not its “truth,” but its actuality, its ecstatic truth.

    You can read all of Ebert’s letter to Herzog here.

    - Heidi


    Still from Encounters at the End of the World

    (via cinephilearchive)

  2. Roger Ebert

    Werner Herzog

    Encounters at the End of the World

  1. Posted on 14 September, 2012

    8,611 notes | Permalink

    Reblogged from swinglargo

    The dancing chicken, the final scene from Werner Herzog’s Stroszek (1977)
See you Monday, internet.

    The dancing chicken, the final scene from Werner Herzog’s Stroszek (1977)

    See you Monday, internet.

  2. Stroszek

    Werner Herzog

  1. Fake Werner Herzog reading Curious George. Tomorrow, real Werner Herzog comes on Fresh Air to talk about The Cave of Forgotten Dreams.

    (Source: youtube.com)

  2. werner herzog

  1. There is a plan to re-create the cave outside in some sort of what I called the Disneyland version. Since nobody’s going to be allowed in the cave, they will replicate the entire cave. They’ll replicate the paintings on the walls. And there was even a plan to re-create, in our imagination, the scent inside of the cave. Which means maybe some carrion of rotting cave bears, some fire, some … resins. I’ve found a master perfumer who fantasize[s] wildly about how the odor may have been 32,000 years ago. However, when you are entering there, it is slightly humid. There’s no significant traces of any smell of anything significant in there.

    — Werner Herzog’s plans to recreate the Chauvet Caves in France…outside of the caves.

  2. werner herzog

    the cave of forgotten dreams

    cave paintings

    chauvet cave

  1. Werner Herzog describes seeing 32,000 year old paintings for the first time: "[The first time I saw the drawings], it was just a moment of complete awe. I was not prepared for the fact that the cave was so beautiful. It’s like crystal cathedrals and stalactites and stalagmites and just like a fairy tale universe down there, and I was not prepared. … Facing the paintings, it’s just sheer awe how beautiful and how accomplished they are." View in High-Res

    Werner Herzog describes seeing 32,000 year old paintings for the first time: "[The first time I saw the drawings], it was just a moment of complete awe. I was not prepared for the fact that the cave was so beautiful. It’s like crystal cathedrals and stalactites and stalagmites and just like a fairy tale universe down there, and I was not prepared. … Facing the paintings, it’s just sheer awe how beautiful and how accomplished they are."

  2. the cave of forgotten dreams

    werner herzog

    cave paintings

    france

    chauvet cave

  1. ardentadversary:

    WERNER HERZOG READING MADELINE

    Fake Werner Herzog reads Madeline. Enjoy!

  2. two straight lines

    werner herzog

  1. Horse heads, Chauvet Cave. (Metropolitan Museum of Art)

    Horse heads, Chauvet Cave. (Metropolitan Museum of Art)

  2. werner herzog

    chauvet cave

    art

    cave paintings

    prehistoric

  1. Werner Herzog Reads Where’s Waldo [may not be safe for work…]

  2. hilarity ensues

    where's waldo

    werner herzog

  1. Posted on 19 April, 2011

    90 notes | Permalink

    Reblogged from lorcychief

    lorcychief:

Ah there he is, Werner Herzog in The Simpsons!

Our guest tomorrow, Werner Herzog, Simpsons-ized. View in High-Res

    lorcychief:

    Ah there he is, Werner Herzog in The Simpsons!

    Our guest tomorrow, Werner Herzog, Simpsons-ized.

  2. Werner Herzog

    the cave of forgotten dreams