1. Charles Glass, author of The Deserters, talks to Dave Davies about how poor leadership contributing to desertion in WWII:

Some units had much higher rates [of desertion] than others. The 36thin the battles in France had the highest rate of any division in the American army. It can’t be accidental that there were junior officers … who were not interested in their men, and not talking to their men, and not looking after their men. [Private] Steve Weiss felt like his captain always led from behind, was never at the front lines, you could never find him, they couldn’t confide in him, they couldn’t ask him for anything, and they felt like they got a raw deal from him.

Image of Waldenburg, Germany, 1945 via Military History View in High-Res

    Charles Glass, author of The Deserters, talks to Dave Davies about how poor leadership contributing to desertion in WWII:

    Some units had much higher rates [of desertion] than others. The 36thin the battles in France had the highest rate of any division in the American army. It can’t be accidental that there were junior officers … who were not interested in their men, and not talking to their men, and not looking after their men. [Private] Steve Weiss felt like his captain always led from behind, was never at the front lines, you could never find him, they couldn’t confide in him, they couldn’t ask him for anything, and they felt like they got a raw deal from him.

    Image of Waldenburg, Germany, 1945 via Military History

  2. wwii

    Fresh Air

    Interviews

    Charles Glass

    The Deserters

  1. Posted on 23 October, 2012

    3,087 notes | Permalink

    Reblogged from theatlantic

    theatlantic:

    Scenes from World War II Photoshopped Onto Today’s Streets

    “It is a bit like painting with history,” Jo Hedwig Teeuwisse says of her project “Ghosts of History.”

    She got the idea a few years ago when she found some old negatives at a flea market in Amsterdam, where she lives. “I was very curious about these mysterious photos and wanted to find out who took them and where. So I started to walk around Amsterdam and made photos in the same spot where the old photos were made and combined them on the computer.”

    See more. [Images: Jo Hedwig Teeuwisse, Unknown, Tom Timmermans]

    In the countdown to Halloween, here’s another spooky installment.

  2. photography

    Halloween

    ghosts

    WWII

  1. It’s a GI’s word most often used for officers, and in particular, officers who are full of themselves. The first military leader to have been called with the A-word — both by his men and his superiors by the way — is George Patton, and that makes perfect sense, particularly if you read the unexpurgated Patton, not the Patton of the movie. … It’s a word that looks up. And the A-word always does. It’s a critique from below, from ground level, of somebody who’s gotten above himself.

    — Geoff Nunberg on the origins of the A-word among griping WWII officers

  2. The A-Word

    Ascent of the A-Word

    Geoffrey Nunberg

    WWII

    Fresh Air

  1. World War two was fought on its soil. There was the blockade. Every single person was touched by the war in some way. Everybody had a lot of people in their family that fought that died. It’s very different having war on your soil rather than sending troops to some remote place where the people don’t really feel it. There are people walking around with an arm missing a leg missing. It was just real visible wounds and stories of survival, stories of heroism, stories of destruction – that all the kids grew up with it all the time.

    — Regina Spektor, On Growing Up in Russia, Feeling Like WWII Just Happened

  2. Regina Spektor

    Russia

    Fresh Air

    WWII