1. Arthur Allen's book, The Fantastic Laboratory of Dr. Weigl, tells the story of two scientists—one Christian and one Jewish—who battled typhus and sabotaged the Nazis during WWII. 
Transmitted by body lice, typhus killed untold numbers of soldiers and civilians during the war. Today’s interview explores the labor-intensive process of making the vaccine and the way the lab sabotaged the Nazis by weakening their vaccines and sneaking doses into Jewish ghettos. 
Allen explains how the Nazis used lice imagery after they invaded Poland: 

"The Nazis … always described the Jews as "vermin" and sometimes used the word "lice." …And this was an ideology that was belittling and obviously also associating Jews with sort of filth and contamination, parasitism — all of these things that you metaphorically can link lice to.
[The Nazis] made it very concrete after they took over the first Polish cities, that there were signs that went up all over Warsaw, for example … that would have a picture of a bearded Jew with a louse that said, “Lice, Jews, typhus,” to make that association in the minds [of] Poles — the idea of keeping them from protecting Jews, [of] seeing Jews as part of this invasive, parasitic, dangerous force that they had to avoid and exterminate.”


German anti-Jewish propaganda: “Jews, lice, typhus.” Poster printed in Warsaw in 1941 and distributed throughout the GG. Courtesy of ŻIH. View in High-Res

    Arthur Allen's book, The Fantastic Laboratory of Dr. Weigl, tells the story of two scientists—one Christian and one Jewish—who battled typhus and sabotaged the Nazis during WWII. 

    Transmitted by body lice, typhus killed untold numbers of soldiers and civilians during the war. Today’s interview explores the labor-intensive process of making the vaccine and the way the lab sabotaged the Nazis by weakening their vaccines and sneaking doses into Jewish ghettos. 

    Allen explains how the Nazis used lice imagery after they invaded Poland: 

    "The Nazis … always described the Jews as "vermin" and sometimes used the word "lice." …And this was an ideology that was belittling and obviously also associating Jews with sort of filth and contamination, parasitism — all of these things that you metaphorically can link lice to.

    [The Nazis] made it very concrete after they took over the first Polish cities, that there were signs that went up all over Warsaw, for example … that would have a picture of a bearded Jew with a louse that said, “Lice, Jews, typhus,” to make that association in the minds [of] Poles — the idea of keeping them from protecting Jews, [of] seeing Jews as part of this invasive, parasitic, dangerous force that they had to avoid and exterminate.”

    German anti-Jewish propaganda: “Jews, lice, typhus.” Poster printed in Warsaw in 1941 and distributed throughout the GG. Courtesy of ŻIH.

  2. typhus

    jewish history

    WWII

    science

    history

    holocaust

    aruthur allen

    fresh air

    terry gross

  1. The Haunting Beauty of World War II Bomb Craters by Henning Rogge via City Lab

"Little evidence exists of the violence that created such landscapes. Rogge’s photographs of these places point to this disconnect—the way violent histories can later appear as placid sites of remembrance. In their pairing of current serenity with past rupture, he asks the viewer to consider the healing effect of time: If this scarred landscape has recovered from the war’s violence, can a country, or a person, heal in the same way?”
View in High-Res

    The Haunting Beauty of World War II Bomb Craters by Henning Rogge via City Lab

    "Little evidence exists of the violence that created such landscapes. Rogge’s photographs of these places point to this disconnect—the way violent histories can later appear as placid sites of remembrance. In their pairing of current serenity with past rupture, he asks the viewer to consider the healing effect of time: If this scarred landscape has recovered from the war’s violence, can a country, or a person, heal in the same way?”

  2. WWII

    bomb

    photography

    forest

    city lab

    henning rogge

  1. What happened to works of art under the Nazis is still very much in the news. One piece of that history is the official Nazi response to Modern Art. They called it degenerate, and put on a number of exhibits to demonstrate how terrible it was. A show at New York’s Neue Galerie  is the first major American exhibit since 1991 to deal with this subject. And Fresh Air’s classical music critic Lloyd Schwartz was there to see it:


One of the most unsettling rooms in an important art exhibit at New York’s Neue Galerie is a room in which numerous empty frames are hanging, with guesses about which paintings might have been in them. The paintings themselves were all lost or destroyed by the Nazis. This is part of a show called “Degenerate Art: The Attack on Modern Art in Nazi Germany, 1937.” Encouraged by Hitler, most Nazis (Goebbels was the rare exception) considered everything but the most hide-bound, traditionally realistic paintings and sculptures to be “degenerate,” a threat to the Aryan ideals of German culture. To bring this home, there was a series of “exhibitions of shame,” designed to teach the German public to despise Modernist art. This culminated in a major show in Munich in 1937, which later toured Germany and Austria. The public crowded to see it. That same summer in Munich, a counter exhibit, called “The Great German Art Exhibition,” including at least one work owned by Hitler, showed what the Nazis thought art should be. The Neue Galerie includes some 80 works from both of these landmark shows. 


Read the full review here. 
Image courtesy of the Neue Galerie  View in High-Res

    What happened to works of art under the Nazis is still very much in the news. One piece of that history is the official Nazi response to Modern Art. They called it degenerate, and put on a number of exhibits to demonstrate how terrible it was. A show at New York’s Neue Galerie  is the first major American exhibit since 1991 to deal with this subject. And Fresh Air’s classical music critic Lloyd Schwartz was there to see it:

    One of the most unsettling rooms in an important art exhibit at New York’s Neue Galerie is a room in which numerous empty frames are hanging, with guesses about which paintings might have been in them. The paintings themselves were all lost or destroyed by the Nazis. This is part of a show called “Degenerate Art: The Attack on Modern Art in Nazi Germany, 1937.” Encouraged by Hitler, most Nazis (Goebbels was the rare exception) considered everything but the most hide-bound, traditionally realistic paintings and sculptures to be “degenerate,” a threat to the Aryan ideals of German culture. To bring this home, there was a series of “exhibitions of shame,” designed to teach the German public to despise Modernist art. This culminated in a major show in Munich in 1937, which later toured Germany and Austria. The public crowded to see it. That same summer in Munich, a counter exhibit, called “The Great German Art Exhibition,” including at least one work owned by Hitler, showed what the Nazis thought art should be. The Neue Galerie includes some 80 works from both of these landmark shows.

    Read the full review here. 

    Image courtesy of the Neue Galerie 

  2. neue galerie

    nazis

    germany

    WWII

    art

    art history

    lloyd schwartz

  1. Charles Glass, author of The Deserters, talks to Dave Davies about how poor leadership contributing to desertion in WWII:

Some units had much higher rates [of desertion] than others. The 36thin the battles in France had the highest rate of any division in the American army. It can’t be accidental that there were junior officers … who were not interested in their men, and not talking to their men, and not looking after their men. [Private] Steve Weiss felt like his captain always led from behind, was never at the front lines, you could never find him, they couldn’t confide in him, they couldn’t ask him for anything, and they felt like they got a raw deal from him.

Image of Waldenburg, Germany, 1945 via Military History View in High-Res

    Charles Glass, author of The Deserters, talks to Dave Davies about how poor leadership contributing to desertion in WWII:

    Some units had much higher rates [of desertion] than others. The 36thin the battles in France had the highest rate of any division in the American army. It can’t be accidental that there were junior officers … who were not interested in their men, and not talking to their men, and not looking after their men. [Private] Steve Weiss felt like his captain always led from behind, was never at the front lines, you could never find him, they couldn’t confide in him, they couldn’t ask him for anything, and they felt like they got a raw deal from him.

    Image of Waldenburg, Germany, 1945 via Military History

  2. wwii

    Fresh Air

    Interviews

    Charles Glass

    The Deserters

  1. Posted on 23 October, 2012

    3,084 notes | Permalink

    Reblogged from theatlantic

    theatlantic:

    Scenes from World War II Photoshopped Onto Today’s Streets

    “It is a bit like painting with history,” Jo Hedwig Teeuwisse says of her project “Ghosts of History.”

    She got the idea a few years ago when she found some old negatives at a flea market in Amsterdam, where she lives. “I was very curious about these mysterious photos and wanted to find out who took them and where. So I started to walk around Amsterdam and made photos in the same spot where the old photos were made and combined them on the computer.”

    See more. [Images: Jo Hedwig Teeuwisse, Unknown, Tom Timmermans]

    In the countdown to Halloween, here’s another spooky installment.

  2. photography

    Halloween

    ghosts

    WWII

  1. It’s a GI’s word most often used for officers, and in particular, officers who are full of themselves. The first military leader to have been called with the A-word — both by his men and his superiors by the way — is George Patton, and that makes perfect sense, particularly if you read the unexpurgated Patton, not the Patton of the movie. … It’s a word that looks up. And the A-word always does. It’s a critique from below, from ground level, of somebody who’s gotten above himself.

    — Geoff Nunberg on the origins of the A-word among griping WWII officers

  2. The A-Word

    Ascent of the A-Word

    Geoffrey Nunberg

    WWII

    Fresh Air

  1. World War two was fought on its soil. There was the blockade. Every single person was touched by the war in some way. Everybody had a lot of people in their family that fought that died. It’s very different having war on your soil rather than sending troops to some remote place where the people don’t really feel it. There are people walking around with an arm missing a leg missing. It was just real visible wounds and stories of survival, stories of heroism, stories of destruction – that all the kids grew up with it all the time.

    — Regina Spektor, On Growing Up in Russia, Feeling Like WWII Just Happened

  2. Regina Spektor

    Russia

    Fresh Air

    WWII