1. Author Rawn James tells Terry Gross how African-American soldiers returning from WWI were treated:



They believed that by making the world safe for democracy abroad, that they would prove their mettle at long last and come back and … have democracy here at home. They returned in 1919 to what be came known as the ‘Red Summer.’ There were so many race riots up in the Northern states and the brutal, terrible lynchings that occurred in the South. And the lynchings became endemic, so much so that they began to almost to become a separate judicial system in the Southern states. So what these soldiers returned to really was a situation … even worse than when they had left. Soldiers were lynched and burned while wearing their military uniforms.



Image via the US Army Center for Military History View in High-Res

    Author Rawn James tells Terry Gross how African-American soldiers returning from WWI were treated:

    They believed that by making the world safe for democracy abroad, that they would prove their mettle at long last and come back and … have democracy here at home. They returned in 1919 to what be came known as the ‘Red Summer.’ There were so many race riots up in the Northern states and the brutal, terrible lynchings that occurred in the South. And the lynchings became endemic, so much so that they began to almost to become a separate judicial system in the Southern states. So what these soldiers returned to really was a situation … even worse than when they had left. Soldiers were lynched and burned while wearing their military uniforms.

    Image via the US Army Center for Military History

  2. Fresh Air

    Interviews

    Rawn James

    The Double V

    African-American history

    lynching

    race riots

    WWI

  1. 31 percent of the men who graduated Oxford in 1913 were killed.

    — On today’s Fresh Air, historian Adam Hochschild explains why WWI was different than other major conflicts:It was different because it was the tradition in most of the major countries for upper-class young men to have military careers, and then it became those young captains and lieutenants.”

  2. wwi

    adam hochschild

  1. nprfunfacts:

    The prime minister of England and the German chancellor both lost a son, as well.

    I’m not sure if this should be classified as fun…but it certainly is astounding.

  2. npr

    fresh air

    WWI

    war

    education

    history

    military

    europe

    oxford

    trivia

    facts

  1. There was also a human cost in a larger sense, in that I think the [first world] war remade the world for the worse in every conceivable way: it ignited the Russian revolution, it laid the ground for Nazism and it made World War II almost certain. It’s pretty hard to imagine the Second World War without the First.

    — On today’s Fresh Air Historian Adam Hochschild  traces the patriotic fervor that catapulted Great Britain into war during the summer of 1914 — as well as the small-but-determined British pacifist movement — in his historical narrative To End All Wars: A Story of Loyalty and Rebellion, 1914-1918.

  2. wwi

    adam hochschild

    world war i

    history

    to end all wars

  1. Posted on 10 August, 2011

    259 notes | Permalink

    Reblogged from itsjohnsen

    itsjohnsen:

    ‘In 1915 (photographer) Leon Gimpel befriended a group of children from the Grenata Street neighbourhood in Paris who had established their own “army”. He began to visit them regularly on Sundays, helping them to build their arsenal from whatever was to hand, providing direction in “casting”, and recording with his camera the army’s triumphs over the evil enemy, the Boche.’
    - Australian War Memorial

    Tomorrow: a conversation about WWI with historian and writer Adam Hochschild.

  2. History

    Paris

    WWI

  1. Maureen Corrigan reviews a new historical narrative of WWI, To End All Wars: But, through eye-witness accounts and official correspondence, Hochschild makes a reader feel anew the shock of modern technological warfare. The much less familiar World War I story that Hochschild uncovers is that of the resisters. To his credit, Hochschild renders the pacifists’ tales no less compelling than that of the soldiers in the trenches.  View in High-Res

    Maureen Corrigan reviews a new historical narrative of WWI, To End All Wars: But, through eye-witness accounts and official correspondence, Hochschild makes a reader feel anew the shock of modern technological warfare. The much less familiar World War I story that Hochschild uncovers is that of the resisters. To his credit, Hochschild renders the pacifists’ tales no less compelling than that of the soldiers in the trenches. 

  2. adam hochschild

    to end all wars

    wwi

    maureen corrigan

  1. Posted on 1 March, 2011

    111 notes | Permalink

    Reblogged from lookhigh

    tballardbrown:

An Era Lost 
Frank Woodruff Buckles, the last known surviving American veteran of World War I, has died. He was 110. “Adventure was looking for me,” Buckles told NPR’s Guy Raz in 2008. (Photo: Library of Congress Veterans History Project)
via lookhigh
View in High-Res

    tballardbrown:

    An Era Lost 

    Frank Woodruff Buckles, the last known surviving American veteran of World War I, has died. He was 110. Adventure was looking for me,” Buckles told NPR’s Guy Raz in 2008. (Photo: Library of Congress Veterans History Project)

    via lookhigh

  2. frank buckles

    wwi

    veteran