1. Maureen Corrigan on how Sandra Gilbert and Susan Gubar reinterpreted the literary canon when they wrote The Madwoman in the Attic: 


The undercover female tradition that Gilbert and Gubar were talking about was one in which writers as disparate as Austen, Emily Dickinson, the Brontes, Louisa May Alcott, and George Eliot used similar themes and images to dramatize the social limitations they themselves suffered as women. Once you started looking for metaphors of confinement, Gilbert and Gubar demonstrated, you saw that novels like Frankenstein, Northanger Abbey and Middlemarch were jam-packed with images of locked rooms and closets, dungeons and enclosures, as well as overbearing patriarch-jailors.


Image of Sandra Gilbert and Susan Gubar via The Washington Post View in High-Res

    Maureen Corrigan on how Sandra Gilbert and Susan Gubar reinterpreted the literary canon when they wrote The Madwoman in the Attic:

    The undercover female tradition that Gilbert and Gubar were talking about was one in which writers as disparate as Austen, Emily Dickinson, the Brontes, Louisa May Alcott, and George Eliot used similar themes and images to dramatize the social limitations they themselves suffered as women. Once you started looking for metaphors of confinement, Gilbert and Gubar demonstrated, you saw that novels like Frankenstein, Northanger Abbey and Middlemarch were jam-packed with images of locked rooms and closets, dungeons and enclosures, as well as overbearing patriarch-jailors.

    Image of Sandra Gilbert and Susan Gubar via The Washington Post

  2. Fresh Air

    Reviews

    Maureen Corrigan

    The Madwoman in the Attic

    Sandra Gilbert

    Susan Gubar

    The Washington Post

  1. Tomorrow: A look at Newt Gingrich’s career and presidential campaign with Karen Tumulty, the National Political correspondent for The Washington Post who has covered him since the 1980s.  

  2. The Washington Post

    karen tumulty

    newt gingrich

    politics