1. Over at The Rumpus is an interesting conversation — "Fresh Air Fail" — between writer Martha Bayne and her friend and fellow writer Zoe Zolbrob. Bayne wrote an essay last August about finding herself unexpectedly pregnant and later miscarrying. We booked her for an interview. The interview didn’t go well and never ran. She reflects in this conversation on the experience of talking to Terry and she is wonderfully insightful about it.

Zoe Zolbrod: But perhaps your question about whether you did yourself a disservice has more to do with you personally, as you continue to work through the effects of that watershed couple months. It’s interesting that after the awkward interview with Terry Gross, when you felt like, to some extent, your privacy was being invaded, your question is whether you should have held less back originally. I would think your experience might have led you to wonder why you had put so much out there in the first place—although in all our conversations, I’ve never heard you second-guess your decision to publish the essay. So when you ask if you were doing yourself a disservice in not going deeper into your own psychology or into the full complexity of the situation, are you really asking more generally about personal writing in general? What would have a satisfying conversation with Terry Gross looked like to you—what would it have covered?
Martha Bayne: Well, one key thing that I forgot is that to a large degree, these interviews function as a stand-in for the story itself. So you’re being asked to re-tell the story you already told on paper, for those who don’t know it, rather than have a conversation that builds on the existing information. I remember subconsciously chafing against this at the time, thinking, Why is she asking me these dumb questions? But I blame myself completely for that part.

We sympathize.
You can read the essay that prompted it all — "Knocked Over: On Biology, Magical Thinking and Choice" here.

    Over at The Rumpus is an interesting conversation — "Fresh Air Fail" — between writer Martha Bayne and her friend and fellow writer Zoe Zolbrob. Bayne wrote an essay last August about finding herself unexpectedly pregnant and later miscarrying. We booked her for an interview. The interview didn’t go well and never ran. She reflects in this conversation on the experience of talking to Terry and she is wonderfully insightful about it.

    Zoe Zolbrod: But perhaps your question about whether you did yourself a disservice has more to do with you personally, as you continue to work through the effects of that watershed couple months. It’s interesting that after the awkward interview with Terry Gross, when you felt like, to some extent, your privacy was being invaded, your question is whether you should have held less back originally. I would think your experience might have led you to wonder why you had put so much out there in the first place—although in all our conversations, I’ve never heard you second-guess your decision to publish the essay. So when you ask if you were doing yourself a disservice in not going deeper into your own psychology or into the full complexity of the situation, are you really asking more generally about personal writing in general? What would have a satisfying conversation with Terry Gross looked like to you—what would it have covered?

    Martha Bayne: Well, one key thing that I forgot is that to a large degree, these interviews function as a stand-in for the story itself. So you’re being asked to re-tell the story you already told on paper, for those who don’t know it, rather than have a conversation that builds on the existing information. I remember subconsciously chafing against this at the time, thinking, Why is she asking me these dumb questions? But I blame myself completely for that part.

    We sympathize.

    You can read the essay that prompted it all — "Knocked Over: On Biology, Magical Thinking and Choice" here.

  2. fail

    Martha Bayne

    Zoe Zolbrod

    The Rumpus

    Fresh Air

    Knocked Over: On Biology

    Magical Thinking And Choice

    Fresh Air Fail

  1. On Monday’s show, Terry is talking with Emily Rapp about Rapp’s new memoir, The Still Point of the Turning World, about Rapp’s son Ronan, who was diagnosed with the degenerative and always-fatal Tay-Sachs disease when he was nine months old. I listened to the interview this morning and it’s wonderful. I am also a fan of Rapp’s writing and so, for your weekend reading, here’s one of my favorite pieces by her — an essay called "Transformation and Transcendence: The Power of Female Friendship" (published on The Rumpus in January 2012). She writes about three older women she met while working overseas in her early twenties, what they taught her about friendship, and how she understood that kind of love with a renewed appreciation in the wake of Ronan’s diagnosis. I just reread the essay for the umpteenth time and can feel the spots on my cheek where the tears have dried again:

I drank with them, silently, as the rain pounded the darkened windows. What I realized, sitting there, was that these women had been in these kinds of emotionally challenging situations for over 20 years. Together. They understood, together, as friends, and apart, as individuals in the world, the urgency of compassion, and that it often goes unnoticed but that this doesn’t make it any less important or vital or difficult to sustain and cultivate. And they also understood that you could try as hard as you possibly could, and disaster could still strike – mercilessly. Without warning, without fairness, and with fatal consequences.

Image by Thomas/Flickr

    On Monday’s show, Terry is talking with Emily Rapp about Rapp’s new memoir, The Still Point of the Turning World, about Rapp’s son Ronan, who was diagnosed with the degenerative and always-fatal Tay-Sachs disease when he was nine months old. I listened to the interview this morning and it’s wonderful. I am also a fan of Rapp’s writing and so, for your weekend reading, here’s one of my favorite pieces by her — an essay called "Transformation and Transcendence: The Power of Female Friendship" (published on The Rumpus in January 2012). She writes about three older women she met while working overseas in her early twenties, what they taught her about friendship, and how she understood that kind of love with a renewed appreciation in the wake of Ronan’s diagnosis. I just reread the essay for the umpteenth time and can feel the spots on my cheek where the tears have dried again:

    I drank with them, silently, as the rain pounded the darkened windows. What I realized, sitting there, was that these women had been in these kinds of emotionally challenging situations for over 20 years. Together. They understood, together, as friends, and apart, as individuals in the world, the urgency of compassion, and that it often goes unnoticed but that this doesn’t make it any less important or vital or difficult to sustain and cultivate. And they also understood that you could try as hard as you possibly could, and disaster could still strike – mercilessly. Without warning, without fairness, and with fatal consequences.

    Image by Thomas/Flickr

  2. Emily Rapp

    The Rumpus

    Transformation and Transcendence: The Power of Femal Friendship

    Fresh Air

    Coming Up

    Tay-Sachs Disease

    Weekend Reading

  1. Posted on 18 January, 2013

    167 notes | Permalink

    Reblogged from nprmusic

    Nick Cave. New album. Yes, please.

    nprmusic:

    Nick Cave & the Bad Seeds “Jubilee Street,” from Push the Sky Away out Feb. 19.

  2. Nick Cave

    NPR Music

    The Rumpus