1. Fresh Air’s Dave Davies spoke to New York Times reporter Nicholas Confessore about how special interest groups are creating single-party states. Here he explains why funneling money into local and state races can be a better investment for donors: 

Look to Washington and you’ll see that there’s not much happening there. It is ceaseless trench warfare where neither party has an advantage and there’s lots of money and lots of special interests trying to dig in.
What’s different at the state level is that cash can go further if you’re a donor or a special interest. You can put some money into the states and see huge return in the partisan tilt of the government and, therefore, in the policies it pursues. So the return on investment is really quite good. There’s more of a chance to have a one-party situation in the state capitols, where both houses — the assembly and the state senate —and the governor’s office are all controlled by the same party. Once you have that, it’s amazing what a Democratic Party or a GOP in a state can accomplish on policy.



image of the Texas state capitol 

    Fresh Air’s Dave Davies spoke to New York Times reporter Nicholas Confessore about how special interest groups are creating single-party states. Here he explains why funneling money into local and state races can be a better investment for donors: 

    Look to Washington and you’ll see that there’s not much happening there. It is ceaseless trench warfare where neither party has an advantage and there’s lots of money and lots of special interests trying to dig in.

    What’s different at the state level is that cash can go further if you’re a donor or a special interest. You can put some money into the states and see huge return in the partisan tilt of the government and, therefore, in the policies it pursues. So the return on investment is really quite good. There’s more of a chance to have a one-party situation in the state capitols, where both houses — the assembly and the state senate —and the governor’s office are all controlled by the same party. Once you have that, it’s amazing what a Democratic Party or a GOP in a state can accomplish on policy.

    image of the Texas state capitol 

  2. fresh air

    nicholas confessore

    new york times

    politics

  1. New York Times political correspondentJonathan Martin joins Fresh Air to talk about the “civil war” going on in the Republican party and how the internet has made politics more uniform across state lines:

You have to point to the power of technology and the rise of the internet. It really has made the world more connected and changed the way politics happen… The states themselves are no longer islands that are driven by their own quirky traditions and their own culture, it’s a much more homogenous political culture, people, especially the political activists who participate in the primaries, they watch the same channels, they read the same publications online, and they’re driven by similar factors if they’re in Concord, New Hampshire or if they’re in Waterloo, Iowa, and I think that to me is the biggest difference. The walls have come down. People now operate much more uniformly across the country in terms of their political actions.


Read more highlights and hear the full interview here View in High-Res

    New York Times political correspondentJonathan Martin joins Fresh Air to talk about the “civil war” going on in the Republican party and how the internet has made politics more uniform across state lines:

    You have to point to the power of technology and the rise of the internet. It really has made the world more connected and changed the way politics happen… The states themselves are no longer islands that are driven by their own quirky traditions and their own culture, it’s a much more homogenous political culture, people, especially the political activists who participate in the primaries, they watch the same channels, they read the same publications online, and they’re driven by similar factors if they’re in Concord, New Hampshire or if they’re in Waterloo, Iowa, and I think that to me is the biggest difference. The walls have come down. People now operate much more uniformly across the country in terms of their political actions.

    Read more highlights and hear the full interview here

  2. fresh air

    interview

    jonathan martin

    new york times

    politics

  1. Tomorrow: News anchor and political commentator Chris Matthews joins us to talk about his book “Tip and the Gipper: When Politics Worked," and to reflect on his own interview style, as well as his Catholic faith. 
When interviewing Matthews likes to, “race them a little, get them working a little faster than they like to think out loud, so they begin to think just on their feet and they have to answer more impulsively, and that way you can get closer to the truth.”

    Tomorrow: News anchor and political commentator Chris Matthews joins us to talk about his book “Tip and the Gipper: When Politics Worked," and to reflect on his own interview style, as well as his Catholic faith.

    When interviewing Matthews likes to, “race them a little, get them working a little faster than they like to think out loud, so they begin to think just on their feet and they have to answer more impulsively, and that way you can get closer to the truth.”

  2. fresh air

    interview

    chris matthews

    tip and the gipper

    tip o'neill

    ronald reagan

    politics

    msnbc

  1. Jonathan Weisman, congressional correspondent for the New York Times talks to us tomorrow about “the underachieving 113th [congress]”:

Terry Gross:  So what did the Congress accomplish so far this session?
Jonathan Weisman:  Almost nothing. This is a remarkable Congress.  The 113th Congress has passed about 13 public laws. By the end of this week maybe there will be a 14th…but right now their rate of passing laws is about half the 112th Congress’s rate, and the 112th racked  up fewer laws than any Congress since World War II, so we are really on pace to have one of the least productive, if not the least productive Congresses in history.”


image via abc news View in High-Res

    Jonathan Weisman, congressional correspondent for the New York Times talks to us tomorrow about “the underachieving 113th [congress]”:

    Terry Gross:  So what did the Congress accomplish so far this session?

    Jonathan Weisman:  Almost nothing. This is a remarkable Congress.  The 113th Congress has passed about 13 public laws. By the end of this week maybe there will be a 14th…but right now their rate of passing laws is about half the 112th Congress’s rate, and the 112th racked  up fewer laws than any Congress since World War II, so we are really on pace to have one of the least productive, if not the least productive Congresses in history.”

    image via abc news

  2. fresh air

    interview

    jonathan weisman

    new york times

    congress

    113th congress

    politics

  1. Chris Hayes tells Terry Gross about how the last decade affected his politics:

My disposition as a human being is kind of a go-along-to-get-along person. I tend to trust authority. I tend to think people in charge broadly know what they’re doing, don’t lie to you, aren’t going start wars for no reason and, you know watching Iraq happen and then watching the financial crisis happen and then Katrina in the middle of that, you know, you turn around and, you think, ‘Wait a second: No one is on top of anything. Who the heck is in charge here? These people who say that they know what they’re doing don’t know what they’re doing. I’m not going to trust them the next time they tell me they know what they’re doing.’ It’s a radically unmooring feeling to recognize that people that you just figured kind of had it under control don’t have it under control and might be totally incompetent or completely corrupt or totally self-dealing.

Image of New Orleans after Hurricane Katrina by greenmanowar

    Chris Hayes tells Terry Gross about how the last decade affected his politics:

    My disposition as a human being is kind of a go-along-to-get-along person. I tend to trust authority. I tend to think people in charge broadly know what they’re doing, don’t lie to you, aren’t going start wars for no reason and, you know watching Iraq happen and then watching the financial crisis happen and then Katrina in the middle of that, you know, you turn around and, you think, ‘Wait a second: No one is on top of anything. Who the heck is in charge here? These people who say that they know what they’re doing don’t know what they’re doing. I’m not going to trust them the next time they tell me they know what they’re doing.’ It’s a radically unmooring feeling to recognize that people that you just figured kind of had it under control don’t have it under control and might be totally incompetent or completely corrupt or totally self-dealing.

    Image of New Orleans after Hurricane Katrina by greenmanowar

  2. chris+hayes

    Interviews

    Fresh Air

    Hurricane Katrina

    New Orleans

    Iraq

    politics

    MSNBC

  1. theatlantic:

    2 Stunning Photos of Senator Daniel Inouye’s Casket Lying in State

    [Image: Joshua Roberts/Reuters]

  2. Daniel Inouye

    The Atlantic

    politics

  1. There is probably no politican of any competence whatsoever who isn’t good at that because that’s in fact what politics is. It’s not about purity. It’s about compromise and strategy and making things actually happen in real time on this earth as opposed to a metaphysical realm.

    — Tony Kushner on Lincoln’s political savvy and what it takes to be a good politician

  2. Tony Kushner

    Fresh Air

    politics

  1. theatlantic:

[Image: National Journal]

In honor of Oktoberfest, find our what your beer says about your politics. View in High-Res

    theatlantic:

    [Image: National Journal]

    In honor of Oktoberfest, find our what your beer says about your politics.

  2. beer

    Oktoberfest

    politics

  1. Everything you need to know about how they see Obama was what happened at where Bryan Fischer works with the American Family Association shortly after the election in 2008. The group, which calls itself a Christian ministry, passed around a picture of Obama’s face, which they had blended with that of Adolf Hitler. And they sort of posted it on the wall and all laughed at it. It showed Obama with a little Hitler moustache and swastikas behind him. They have attacked Obama relentlessly since his election in 2008. They regard him as the avatar of godless socialism.

    — Jane Mayer profiles Christian radio host Bryan Fischer on today’s Fresh Air.

  2. Bryan Fischer

    radio

    american family association

    politics

    religion

  1. He wants to shape the policy of the Republican Party because he hopes to change America. He’s evangelizing to make America more in line with his Biblical views. On his own, he probably defines such far out views that there’s a tendency to dismiss him. But what makes Bryan Fischer worth paying some attention to is that he’s part of a larger group — a bloc of voters, the evangelical white voters — who have become a very well-organized and very significant part of the Republican Party at this point.

    — On today’s Fresh Air, Jane Mayer from The New Yorker details how a Christian radio host from Tupelo, Miss. is pushing far-right and anti-gay policy decisions on the Romney campaign and the Republican Party.

  2. jane mayer

    bryan fischer

    politics

    religion

  1. But as everyone should know by now, liberties begin to erode when you have laws that are too widely drawn. And laws which say that under no circumstances can a court take any account of the Shariah are necessarily discriminatory. They’re necessarily over broad. And they necessarily create communal dissention for no good purpose.

    — Sadakat Kadri on the movement to ban Shariah law in America.

  2. shariah law

    islamic law

    sadakat kadri

    religion

    politics

  1. Throughout the past four years, we keep hearing about the impact of this economy on the middle class, which of course, is important, but it’s having a great impact on these people, too. They can resort to strategies that make them seem unsympathetic. That’s what’s been missing from this debate. This recession aftermath has been so framed in terms of an impact on the middle class that the poor have largely been pushed out of the spotlight … and they’re really in political oblivion right now.

    — On today’s Fresh Air, how the recession has impacted America’s poorest women.

  2. jason deparle

    new york times

    poverty

    welfare reform

    politics

    economy

  1. On Tuesday’s Fresh Air, we talk to journalist Peter Beinart about his book The Crisis of Zionism, which argues that Israel cannot be a true democratic state as long as there are settlements in the West Bank, where Jews are citizens of the Israeli state and Palestinians are not. In his book and in a recent New York Times op-ed, Beinart has proposed a boycott of goods made in the Jewish settlements in the West Bank.
We also talk to journalist Gary Rosenblatt. Rosenblatt, the editor and publish of The Jewish Weekof New York, details the reaction to Beinart’s article and explains why he disagrees with the boycott proposal.

    On Tuesday’s Fresh Air, we talk to journalist Peter Beinart about his book The Crisis of Zionism, which argues that Israel cannot be a true democratic state as long as there are settlements in the West Bank, where Jews are citizens of the Israeli state and Palestinians are not. In his book and in a recent New York Times op-ed, Beinart has proposed a boycott of goods made in the Jewish settlements in the West Bank.

    We also talk to journalist Gary Rosenblatt. Rosenblatt, the editor and publish of The Jewish Weekof New York, details the reaction to Beinart’s article and explains why he disagrees with the boycott proposal.

  2. peter beinart

    gary rosenblatt

    israel

    middle east

    politics

    west bank

    boycott

  1. "In these days of 24/7 media — where even the dinkiest problem can get magnified and go viral — campaigns are obsessed with controlling every single thing, including our perception of the campaign’s workings. Watching The War Room, I kept thinking that the most old-fashioned thing about the Clinton campaign was that it trusted anyone to come inside it with cameras running.” — John Powers, Inside Bill Clinton’s Campaign ‘War Room’ View in High-Res

    "In these days of 24/7 media — where even the dinkiest problem can get magnified and go viral — campaigns are obsessed with controlling every single thing, including our perception of the campaign’s workings. Watching The War Room, I kept thinking that the most old-fashioned thing about the Clinton campaign was that it trusted anyone to come inside it with cameras running.” — John Powers, Inside Bill Clinton’s Campaign ‘War Room’

  2. war room

    1992

    bill clinton

    politics

    john powers

    movie review

  1. We aired two segments on yesterday’s show. Both had to do with SuperPACs.

    Republican and Democratic SuperPACs, empowered by the Supreme Court’s Citizens United decision, can collect unlimited contributions from individuals, corporations and unions. Trevor Potter became a celebrity when he signed on as Stephen Colbert’s lawyer and advised the satirical TV host on how to create his own SuperPAC.

    James Bopp is the lawyer who first represented Citizens United in the case that ended up in the Supreme Court, which ruled that corporations and unions could give money to political committees active in election campaigns. That decision and subsequent lower court decisions have led to SuperPACs, which allow corporations, unions and individuals to make unlimited contributions, pool them together, and use the money for political campaigns.

  2. citizens united

    james bopp

    superpac

    trevor potter

    politics