1. theparisreview:

Gay Talese’s outline for “Frank Sinatra Has a Cold,” 1966, written on a shirt board.


Listen to Talese read from the classic profile of Sinatra here.Read the piece in its entirety over at Esquire here.

View in High-Res

    theparisreview:

    Gay Talese’s outline for “Frank Sinatra Has a Cold,” 1966, written on a shirt board.

    Listen to Talese read from the classic profile of Sinatra here.
    Read the piece in its entirety over at Esquire here.

  2. Gay Talese

    Frank Sinatra Has A Cold

    And Always Will

    Paris Review

    Esquire

  1. Over at the Paris Review Online, one of my favorite writers — John Jeremiah Sullivan — has a short essay about the tension between religious belief and religious music. It is also an essay about a new collection of old country music —Work Hard, Play Hard, Pray Hard — collected by Kentuckian Don Wahle, who kept the records in boxes until the day he died. Says Sullivan about the track “Beyond the Starry Plane”:






From the abyss of the static come “dear Mother” and “no matter what I do” and “we shall meet again” and “Jesus is my God.” I listen to this song and imagine Don Wahle listening to it, leaning forward to hear it better. An infinitesimal point of communion, a shared pause before the obliteration.






Sullivan also wrote the liner notes for the collection, which Milo Miles reviewed for Fresh Air a few weeks back.
-Nell
Image by Tennessee Home and Farm via Flickr Commons View in High-Res

    Over at the Paris Review Online, one of my favorite writers — John Jeremiah Sullivan — has a short essay about the tension between religious belief and religious music. It is also an essay about a new collection of old country music —Work Hard, Play Hard, Pray Hard — collected by Kentuckian Don Wahle, who kept the records in boxes until the day he died. Says Sullivan about the track “Beyond the Starry Plane”:

    From the abyss of the static come “dear Mother” and “no matter what I do” and “we shall meet again” and “Jesus is my God.” I listen to this song and imagine Don Wahle listening to it, leaning forward to hear it better. An infinitesimal point of communion, a shared pause before the obliteration.

    Sullivan also wrote the liner notes for the collection, which Milo Miles reviewed for Fresh Air a few weeks back.

    -Nell

    Image by Tennessee Home and Farm via Flickr Commons

  2. Fresh Air

    Reviews

    Milo Miles

    Don Wahle

    Work Hard Play Hard Pray Hard

    John Jeremiah Sullivan

    Paris Review