1. 
"Shirley Temple, who charmed the nation as a child movie star in the 1930s and went on to become one of the nation’s diplomats in posts that included ambassador to Czechoslovakia during the Cold War, has died.
She was 85.”

Read the full story here
image via pinterest

    "Shirley Temple, who charmed the nation as a child movie star in the 1930s and went on to become one of the nation’s diplomats in posts that included ambassador to Czechoslovakia during the Cold War, has died.

    She was 85.”

    Read the full story here

    image via pinterest

  2. shirley temple

    1930s

    obituary

    npr

  1. Our Rock Historian Ed Ward shared with us that “Cowboy Jack” Clement, musician and record producer, passed away last week at the age of 82. He was known for arranging the mariachi horns in Johnny Cash's #1 hit “Ring of Fire" among dozens of other hits.
You can read an obituary in the Tennessean here.

image via Tennessean gallery  View in High-Res

    Our Rock Historian Ed Ward shared with us that “Cowboy Jack” Clement, musician and record producer, passed away last week at the age of 82. He was known for arranging the mariachi horns in Johnny Cash's #1 hit “Ring of Fire" among dozens of other hits.

    You can read an obituary in the Tennessean here.

    image via Tennessean gallery 

  2. obituary

    cowboy jack clement

    Johnny Cash

    ring of fire

  1. Fresh Air remembers Tuvian throat singer Kongar-ol Ondar, who passed away July 25th. He was 51. 
Mr. Ondar was a superstar in Tuva. He’s often known for his prominent role in the 1999 documentary “Genghis Blues" about throat singing. He collaborated with Frank Zappa, Willie Nelson, Bela Fleck, among many others.
photo via last.fm

    Fresh Air remembers Tuvian throat singer Kongar-ol Ondar, who passed away July 25th. He was 51.

    Mr. Ondar was a superstar in Tuva. He’s often known for his prominent role in the 1999 documentary “Genghis Blues" about throat singing. He collaborated with Frank Zappa, Willie Nelson, Bela Fleck, among many others.


    photo via last.fm

  2. fresh air

    interview

    kongar-ol ondar

    tuvian throat singer

    obituary

  1. Ravi Shankar has died. The great sitar player and composer brought eastern music west. Here he is in 1967 on the Dick Cavett show. At the beginning of the clip you’ll see George Harrison, who studied for a time with Shankar.

  2. Ravi Shankar

    Obituary

  1. Essentially poetry, if it is poetry, does not lend itself to simple readings, to oversimplifications — though people may try to read it that way. It seems to me that the essential nature of a poem is that there is ambivalence and ambiguity quivering underneath.

    — Adrienne Rich: The 1989 Fresh Air interview

  2. adrienne rich

    poetry

    obituary

    feminism

  1. Remembering Peter Bergman, one of the founding members of the four-man surrealist comedy troupe The Firesign Theatre.

  2. peter bergman

    firesign theatre

    obituary

  1. Just one more thing…Audio for Terry’s 1995 conversation with Peter Falk is now up. Enjoy!

  2. peter falk

    obituary

    columbo

  1. Posted on 27 June, 2011

    72 notes | Permalink

    Reblogged from rebbylau

    rebbylau:

So I just finished playing this my family seriously has the weirdest board game collection ever… Also R.I.P. Peter falk

Just One More Thing About Peter Falk, TV’s Columbo: The Fresh Air Interview and Remembrance 
View in High-Res

    rebbylau:

    So I just finished playing this my family seriously has the weirdest board game collection ever… Also R.I.P. Peter falk

    Just One More Thing About Peter Falk, TV’s Columbo: The Fresh Air Interview and Remembrance

  2. columbo

    peter falk

    obituary

  1. Posted on 14 April, 2011

    27 notes | Permalink

    Reblogged from badlands

    badlands:

Sidney Lumet on the set of Dog Day Afternoon (1975)
It would be negligent to finish up this series of posts without acknowledging the director’s death this past weekend. 
(The photo is from a New York interview with Lumet from 2007, which, awkwardly, begins with the quote: “It’s strange, because I’m not dead yet.”)

Tomorrow: ATTICA ATTICA ATTICA. We will remember director Sidney Lumet with excerpts from a 1988 interview.  View in High-Res

    badlands:

    Sidney Lumet on the set of Dog Day Afternoon (1975)

    It would be negligent to finish up this series of posts without acknowledging the director’s death this past weekend.

    (The photo is from a New York interview with Lumet from 2007, which, awkwardly, begins with the quote: “It’s strange, because I’m not dead yet.”)

    Tomorrow: ATTICA ATTICA ATTICA. We will remember director Sidney Lumet with excerpts from a 1988 interview. 

  2. sidney lumet

    fresh air

    obituary

    film

  1. washingtonpoststyle:

Harry Wesley Coover, the inventor of super glue, is dead.
Obit here. Photo by David Grace (AP/The Kingsport Times-News)

He stuck around for 94 years.  View in High-Res

    washingtonpoststyle:

    Harry Wesley Coover, the inventor of super glue, is dead.

    Obit here. Photo by David Grace (AP/The Kingsport Times-News)

    He stuck around for 94 years. 

  2. super glue

    obituary

  1. Remembering playwright Lanford Wilson, who won a Pulitzer Prize for his 1980 play, “Talley’s Folly.” He also co-founded the New York Circle Repertory Company.

  2. lanford wilson

    obituary

    talley's folly

  1. Fresh Air remembers dialect coach Sam Chwat, who helped celebrities like Julia Roberts and Robert DeNiro lose and gain accents for film roles, including DeNiro’s1991 film Cape Fear: "We worked very hard and long on that one, and [De Niro] did beautifully. What you’re hearing [in Cape Fear] is mostly vowels that are changed. For example, instead of family, you’re hearing a more nasal sound in the ‘a.’ Instead of the vowel ‘i,’ which never exists in any part of the South, you have [the sound] ‘ah.’” These are some of the changes that we went through, word for word, in the script and all through the shooting.” View in High-Res

    Fresh Air remembers dialect coach Sam Chwat, who helped celebrities like Julia Roberts and Robert DeNiro lose and gain accents for film roles, including DeNiro’s1991 film Cape Fear: "We worked very hard and long on that one, and [De Niro] did beautifully. What you’re hearing [in Cape Fear] is mostly vowels that are changed. For example, instead of family, you’re hearing a more nasal sound in the ‘a.’ Instead of the vowel ‘i,’ which never exists in any part of the South, you have [the sound] ‘ah.’” These are some of the changes that we went through, word for word, in the script and all through the shooting.”

  2. obituary

    robert deniro

    sam chwat

    julia roberts

    speech therapy

    dialect coach

  1. Jazz Pianist George Shearing, on writing the standard “Lullaby of Birdland” — “I wrote it in 10 minutes — I always say 10 minutes and 35 years in the  business — over a steak in my dining room when I lived in New   Jersey.   I went back to that same butcher a thousand times trying to get that  same steak again.” Excerpts from a 1986 interview with Shearing, who died yesterday at the age of 91. View in High-Res

    Jazz Pianist George Shearing, on writing the standard “Lullaby of Birdland” — “I wrote it in 10 minutes — I always say 10 minutes and 35 years in the business — over a steak in my dining room when I lived in New Jersey. I went back to that same butcher a thousand times trying to get that same steak again.” Excerpts from a 1986 interview with Shearing, who died yesterday at the age of 91.

  2. george shearing

    lullaby of birdland

    obituary

    jazz

    piano

  1. John Barry, on composing the music for Goldfinger's theme song: "Originally, it just started off with a  chorus, ‘De dum.’  And there was no ‘By ya ya ya ya.’  That wasn’t there  then.  And we had a break, they went up for their 10-minute tea break,  and in the tea break I just found it.  What we were playing, it was  empty, so I sat down at the piano and I came up with ‘Da ya na na da.’   And did it on wah-wah trumpets." View in High-Res

    John Barry, on composing the music for Goldfinger's theme song: "Originally, it just started off with a chorus, ‘De dum.’ And there was no ‘By ya ya ya ya.’ That wasn’t there then. And we had a break, they went up for their 10-minute tea break, and in the tea break I just found it. What we were playing, it was empty, so I sat down at the piano and I came up with ‘Da ya na na da.’ And did it on wah-wah trumpets."

  2. john barry

    james bond

    goldfinger

    obituary

  1. Friday: We remember composer John Barry with highlights from a 1999 interview. Barry composed the music for eleven Bond songs, as well as the the theme songs for “Thunderball” and “Goldfinger.” View in High-Res

    Friday: We remember composer John Barry with highlights from a 1999 interview. Barry composed the music for eleven Bond songs, as well as the the theme songs for “Thunderball” and “Goldfinger.”

  2. John Barry

    james bond

    thunderball

    obituary