1. New York Times National Security Correspondent David Sanger sees cyber-espionage as a whole new “field of conflict” on the global stage — and that the U.S. isn’t having an open discussion about it:

"The Obama administration has pressed more leak investigations, conducted more leak investigations, launched formal inquiries, or in some cases, criminal cases, than all previous [administrations] combined. And these investigations all have a chilling effect on later stories that you do even if the later stories are on completely different subjects.
I think there’s a lot more concern inside the U.S. government right now about being found to be talking to reporters, even if you’re talking about something that is unclassified. … It’s understandably difficult to get American officials to talk about their plans for potential cyberattacks of cyberdefenses. I understand that, but it’s also very difficult to get officials to talk about our policy about using these cyberweapons as a tool of American power. And that’s what worries me, because in a healthy democracy, I think the American citizens have to be at least informed of — and maybe participate in the debate about — how we want to use these weapons since we are vulnerable to them ourselves.”
View in High-Res

    New York Times National Security Correspondent David Sanger sees cyber-espionage as a whole new “field of conflict” on the global stage — and that the U.S. isn’t having an open discussion about it:

    "The Obama administration has pressed more leak investigations, conducted more leak investigations, launched formal inquiries, or in some cases, criminal cases, than all previous [administrations] combined. And these investigations all have a chilling effect on later stories that you do even if the later stories are on completely different subjects.

    I think there’s a lot more concern inside the U.S. government right now about being found to be talking to reporters, even if you’re talking about something that is unclassified. … It’s understandably difficult to get American officials to talk about their plans for potential cyberattacks of cyberdefenses. I understand that, but it’s also very difficult to get officials to talk about our policy about using these cyberweapons as a tool of American power. And that’s what worries me, because in a healthy democracy, I think the American citizens have to be at least informed of — and maybe participate in the debate about — how we want to use these weapons since we are vulnerable to them ourselves.”

  2. cyberwar

    cybersecurity

    espionage

    david sanger

    NSA

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    new york times

    interview

    fresh air

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  1. Calgary is a city built on this resource. Calgary is like a classic boom town; all of the skyscrapers in Calgary are named after the energy companies that are extracting the oil from the oil sands, or the banks that are funding them. There are construction cranes all over. And Canada … is defining itself as an energy superpower. I think it surprises a lot of people to hear they have the third-largest oil reserve in the world, behind Venezuela and Saudi Arabia.

    —  Reporter for the New Yorker Ryan Lizza speaks on Fresh Air about the Canadian oil industry and the Keystone Pipeline XL controversy

  2. fresh air

    interview

    ryan lizza

    the new yorker

    keystone pipeline

    obama

    oil

  1. Ryan Lizza joins Fresh Air to talk about Keystone Pipeline XL and how Obama is at a possible turning point for climate change mitigation:

Barack Obama gave a very important speech on his second term climate change priorities and at the very last moment he inserted some language into that speech about how he would settle this issue of the Keystone Pipeline and he said for him, he doesn’t want to see that pipeline approved if it would significantly contribute to an increase in greenhouse gas emissions. So how the State Department settles that question is what everyone has their eye on. 




… I think there’s an important moment here, for Barack Obama if he chooses to take it — even if he thinks that denying the permit to build Keystone won’t have a huge impact on greenhouse gas emissions — he could use it as a symbolic turning point in the kind of energy future he wants America to have. That is, he might say, ‘At some point we have to move away from fossil fuels and I’m using this moment to lead a crusade in America to move away from fossil fuels.’



Hear the full interview, read more interview highlights, or read his article in the New Yorker here.

photo via globalpost View in High-Res

    Ryan Lizza joins Fresh Air to talk about Keystone Pipeline XL and how Obama is at a possible turning point for climate change mitigation:

    Barack Obama gave a very important speech on his second term climate change priorities and at the very last moment he inserted some language into that speech about how he would settle this issue of the Keystone Pipeline and he said for him, he doesn’t want to see that pipeline approved if it would significantly contribute to an increase in greenhouse gas emissions. So how the State Department settles that question is what everyone has their eye on. 

    … I think there’s an important moment here, for Barack Obama if he chooses to take it — even if he thinks that denying the permit to build Keystone won’t have a huge impact on greenhouse gas emissions — he could use it as a symbolic turning point in the kind of energy future he wants America to have. That is, he might say, ‘At some point we have to move away from fossil fuels and I’m using this moment to lead a crusade in America to move away from fossil fuels.’

    Hear the full interview, read more interview highlights, or read his article in the New Yorker here.

    photo via globalpost

  2. fresh air

    interview

    ryan lizza

    keystone pipeline

    climate change

    obama

  1. Mark Mazzetti talks to Terry Gross about President Obama's foreign policy:

It shouldn’t have been a surprise to anyone that [Obama] believed in drone strikes, but what has been surprising, I think, is the extent that these shadow wars really have come to define Obama’s foreign policy. That, you know, he ended the war in Iraq and, after the surge in Afghanistan, he’s now winding down, and it was interesting he said during his second inaugural address, ‘A decade of war is now coming to an end,’ but that’s a decade of the wars that we know about. It’s the decade of the public wars. What are continuing? Are these more secret wars, and there really isn’t any evidence yet of them abating. The drone strikes continue and we’ll see what happens in the second term.


Image from Obama’s January 2013 inaugural festivities via The White House

    Mark Mazzetti talks to Terry Gross about President Obama's foreign policy:

    It shouldn’t have been a surprise to anyone that [Obama] believed in drone strikes, but what has been surprising, I think, is the extent that these shadow wars really have come to define Obama’s foreign policy. That, you know, he ended the war in Iraq and, after the surge in Afghanistan, he’s now winding down, and it was interesting he said during his second inaugural address, ‘A decade of war is now coming to an end,’ but that’s a decade of the wars that we know about. It’s the decade of the public wars. What are continuing? Are these more secret wars, and there really isn’t any evidence yet of them abating. The drone strikes continue and we’ll see what happens in the second term.

    Image from Obama’s January 2013 inaugural festivities via The White House

  2. obama

    Fresh Air

    Interviews

    Mark Mazzetti

    The Way of the Knife

    foreign policy

    drones

  1. If you look at the two largest Super PACs on the Romney side, they have raised $122 million. By July they had, anyway. And in contrast, the two largest supporting Super PACs that are supporting Obama have raised only $30 million by that period, so it’s a very big differential. But it doesn’t begin to explain how much of a gap there is in money. There’s an even bigger gap in other kinds of outside groups that are not Super PACs — there are nonprofits that don’t disclose their donors and there the differential is just overwhelming. Obama is being completely out-raised in these secret donations which are piling in for Romney at this point.

    — The New Yorker’s Jane Mayer on Fresh Air

  2. Super Pac

    Jane Mayer

    New Yorker

    Obama

    Romney

    election

  1. "The Supreme Court is saying that campaign spending is a matter of free speech, but it has set up a situation where the more money you have the more speech you can buy," Axelrod says. "That’s a threatening concept for democracy." He adds, "If your party serves the powerful and well-funded interests, and there’s no limit to what you can spend, you have a permanent, structural advantage. We’re averaging fifty-dollar checks in our campaign, and trying to ward off these seven- or even eight-figure checks on the other side. That disparity is pretty striking, and so are the implications. In many ways, we’re back in the Gilded Age. We have robber barons buying the government."

    -from Jane Mayer’s New Yorker article, Schmooze or Lose

  2. Fresh Air

    Jane Mayer

    Obama

    Super Pac

    The New Yorker

  1. Posted on 11 October, 2011

    20,577 notes | Permalink

    Reblogged from gayfaith

    Barack Obama signs the repeal of Don’t Ask Don’t Tell into law

    Tomorrow: 1st Lt. Josh Seefried and 1st Lt. Karl Johnson on the end of Don’t Ask Don’t Tell. Seefried blogged under the pseudonym JD Smith (for The Daily Beast) and Johnson wrote under the pseudonym Officer X (for Time) before DADT was repealed. Seefried is one of the co creators of OutServe

  2. barack obama

    dadt

    don't ask don't tell

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  1. nprfunfacts:

    The official font of President Obama’s presidential campaign was Gotham.

    Everything written on this blog is sung in Comic Sans.

  2. npr

    trivia

    facts

    obama

    font

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    gotham

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    weekend edition

    money

  1. Saying that the action will strengthen the nation and end a practice  that forced some members of the military to lie about themselves,  President Obama this hour signed legislation that repeals the “don’t  ask, don’t tell” law that bars openly gay men and women from serving in  the U.S. military. View in High-Res

    Saying that the action will strengthen the nation and end a practice that forced some members of the military to lie about themselves, President Obama this hour signed legislation that repeals the “don’t ask, don’t tell” law that bars openly gay men and women from serving in the U.S. military.

  2. dadt

    obama

    military