1. TUESDAY - How American politics went tabloid.   The new book All The Truth Is Out, is about how the Gary Hart sex scandal in 1987, ended his presidential candidacy, and was a turning point in how the media cover politics, emphasizing quote character issues, over political experience.  We’ll hear form the book’s author, Matt Bai, former chief political correspondent for the New York Times Magazine. View in High-Res

    TUESDAY - How American politics went tabloid.   The new book All The Truth Is Out, is about how the Gary Hart sex scandal in 1987, ended his presidential candidacy, and was a turning point in how the media cover politics, emphasizing quote character issues, over political experience.  We’ll hear form the book’s author, Matt Bai, former chief political correspondent for the New York Times Magazine.

  2. fresh air

    interview

    tabloid

    politics

    news

  1. The five men charged for the brutal beating and rape of a Central Park jogger in 1989 have been exonerated and will settle suit for $40 million.

Soon after they confessed in 1989, the boys recanted their statements saying the police pressured them to say they had committed the crime. All were convicted and served prison terms of up to 13 years. In 2002 a jailed serial rapist and murderer confessed to carrying out the crime, and his DNA matched the records. The “Central Park 5” brought a civil rights suit against the city of New York and are now settling for $40 million. 

If you want to learn more about the psychology of false confessions listen to our interview with Doug Starr. Starr went undercover and was trained in two different kinds of interrogation techniques. He explains why so many people confess to crimes they didn’t commit. 




Photo by James Estrin (Lawyers, in foreground, and the five defendants in the Central Park rape case of a female jogger waiting for the ruling in February 1990 in State Supreme Court in Manhattan.) View in High-Res

    The five men charged for the brutal beating and rape of a Central Park jogger in 1989 have been exonerated and will settle suit for $40 million.

    Soon after they confessed in 1989, the boys recanted their statements saying the police pressured them to say they had committed the crime. All were convicted and served prison terms of up to 13 years. In 2002 a jailed serial rapist and murderer confessed to carrying out the crime, and his DNA matched the records. The “Central Park 5” brought a civil rights suit against the city of New York and are now settling for $40 million. 

    If you want to learn more about the psychology of false confessions listen to our interview with Doug Starr. Starr went undercover and was trained in two different kinds of interrogation techniques. He explains why so many people confess to crimes they didn’t commit. 

    Photo by James Estrin (Lawyers, in foreground, and the five defendants in the Central Park rape case of a female jogger waiting for the ruling in February 1990 in State Supreme Court in Manhattan.)

  2. central park five

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  1. Posted on 27 March, 2013

    996 notes | Permalink

    Reblogged from onthemenjay

    Chris Hayes tells Terry Gross about having people pay attention to his appearance once he started appearing on television:

You start noticing that people are noticing how you look and it is a profoundly alienating experience when it first happens, where you go on TV and you say something about some topic of the day and on the Internet people are like, ‘What was up with that shirt?’ ‘What was up with your hair?’ and you think, ‘Oh, that’s kind of a bummer.’ I think, actually, as a man it was a really useful, tiny sliver — a tiny, empathetic window — into what navigating the world as a woman often is, in which looks are so fore-grounded and so scrutinized and so discussed.


View in High-Res

    Chris Hayes tells Terry Gross about having people pay attention to his appearance once he started appearing on television:

    You start noticing that people are noticing how you look and it is a profoundly alienating experience when it first happens, where you go on TV and you say something about some topic of the day and on the Internet people are like, ‘What was up with that shirt?’ ‘What was up with your hair?’ and you think, ‘Oh, that’s kind of a bummer.’ I think, actually, as a man it was a really useful, tiny sliver — a tiny, empathetic window — into what navigating the world as a woman often is, in which looks are so fore-grounded and so scrutinized and so discussed.

  2. Fresh Air

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  1. Tomorrow: Historian Andrew Preston on how religious rhetoric has shaped U.S. foreign policy since the days of George Washington.



United States License Plate Map (by designturnpike)

    Tomorrow: Historian Andrew Preston on how religious rhetoric has shaped U.S. foreign policy since the days of George Washington.

    United States License Plate Map (by designturnpike)

  2. religion

    foreign policy

    us

    news

    history

    andrew preston

  1. Any attack on Iran would probably have the effect of unifying a very divided country. It would bring up a nationalistic surge. It could force opposition politicians to side with the Mullahs. It could make a battle with Israel or the United States an issue in the streets of Tehran rather than seeing those protestors out, as they were in 2009, protesting against their own government.

    — New York Times correspondent David Sanger, on what could happen if Israel or the U.S. attacked facilities in Iran.

  2. iran

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  1. The Obama administration has taken the position that if regime change is really Israel’s goal in Iran, then the bombing of the [nuclear] facilities would probably be the single most counterproductive step that they could take.

    — On today’s Fresh Air, David Sanger, the chief Washington correspondent for The New York Times, talks about the ongoing nuclear standoff and details what could potentially happen if Israel decided to mount a military strike against uranium enrichment sites in Iran.

  2. iran

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  1. One of the things that we as a country are learning is that people who are wounded in war are wounded forever.

    — On Thursday’s Fresh Air, veteran combat reporter David Wood talks about some of the challenges that severely wounded soldiers face when they return home from Afghanistan and Iraq.

  2. david wood

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  1. You can look at it as American taxpayer money is ultimately going into the pockets of the Haqqani Network.

    — 

    The Haqqani Network operates in eastern Afghanistan, where it carries out bombings and kidnappings. They were also blamed for the recent bombing at the U.S. Embassy in Kabul. New York Times reporter Mark Mazzetti says the network finances its activities partially through extortion money it receives from U.S.-funded contractors in Afghanistan.

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  1. Gives one reason to paws. (Happy weekend!)

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  1. ageofperil:

    We built a database of suspicious activity reports obtained through open-government laws in Minnesota. Check it out. The database accompanies a package of stories we released today at the Center for Investigative Reporting about the post-9/11 phenomenon of suspicious activity. You can read the stories online now or listen to National Public Radio’s All Things Considered this afternoon. Another version will air tonight on PBS NewsHour, and one more story will be available tomorrow on NPR’s Morning Edition.

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  1. newsmediatumblrs:

A directory of news organizations on Tumblr.
Excuse if incomplete — drop a link or tell me what’s what.
Update: Some new info right here. And please follow the blog to get corrections and additions! I’m not planning on building any notifications into that table.

Philly represent! View in High-Res

    newsmediatumblrs:

    A directory of news organizations on Tumblr.

    Excuse if incomplete — drop a link or tell me what’s what.

    Update: Some new info right here. And please follow the blog to get corrections and additions! I’m not planning on building any notifications into that table.

    Philly represent!

  2. news

  1. Posted on 23 August, 2011

    101 notes | Permalink

    Reblogged from sonicbloom11

    sonicbloom11:

via USGS

We just ran out of our studio. The station was shaking! View in High-Res

    sonicbloom11:

    via USGS

    We just ran out of our studio. The station was shaking!

  2. dc

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    philly

  1.  
From NPR
At A Glance: What’s Happening In Libya

Mustafa Abdel Jalil, chairman of the National Transitional Council, declared “the era of Gadhafi is over” at a Monday news conference in Benghazi.
Crowds in the capital, Tripoli, the rebel stronghold of Benghazi and elsewhere have poured into the streets to celebrate.
Fighting continues in pockets of the capital, including around Gadhafi’s compound at Bab al-Aziziya. The rebel leadership tells NPR it could still be a week before Tripoli is secured.
Moammar Gadhafi’s whereabouts are unknown, but rebels quickly captured one of his sons, Seif al-Islam. Another son, Mohammed, is apparently under house arrest.
President Obama has promised U.S. cooperation with the rebels, and British Prime Minister David Cameron says frozen Libyan assets will be released soon.

For the latest developments, check The Two-Way news blog and follow NPR’s Andy Carvin, who is rounding up reports from Libyans and others on Twitter (@acarvin).

     

    From NPR

    At A Glance: What’s Happening In Libya

    • Mustafa Abdel Jalil, chairman of the National Transitional Council, declared “the era of Gadhafi is over” at a Monday news conference in Benghazi.
    • Crowds in the capital, Tripoli, the rebel stronghold of Benghazi and elsewhere have poured into the streets to celebrate.
    • Fighting continues in pockets of the capital, including around Gadhafi’s compound at Bab al-Aziziya. The rebel leadership tells NPR it could still be a week before Tripoli is secured.
    • Moammar Gadhafi’s whereabouts are unknown, but rebels quickly captured one of his sons, Seif al-Islam. Another son, Mohammed, is apparently under house arrest.
    • President Obama has promised U.S. cooperation with the rebels, and British Prime Minister David Cameron says frozen Libyan assets will be released soon.

    For the latest developments, check The Two-Way news blog and follow NPR’s Andy Carvin, who is rounding up reports from Libyans and others on Twitter (@acarvin).

  2. libya

    news

  1. For someone whose ideology is really defined by a strong dislike for government, if you look at the way she’s supported herself over the years, it’s mostly through the government. After law school, she works at the IRS, she’s there for four years, then in 1992 she starts taking in foster children and does that from 1992-1998 and is paid by the state to do that. She then works briefly for a local charter school and then she starts running for office and becomes first an employee of the state of Minnesota and then a congresswoman, an employee of the federal government. … Her husband is a psychologist [who] has two counseling clinics that like any other medical professional [clinic] takes lots of money from Medicare and Medicaid — and then on top of that, has received generous farm subsidies for a farm he owns in Wisconsin.

    — On today’s Fresh Air, New Yorker writer Ryan Lizza on Michele Bachmann.

  2. ryan lizza

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  1. For a number of years, Michele Bachmann’s personal website had a list of books she recommended people read. … I was looking over the list and noticed this biography of [Robert E.] Lee by [Steven] Wilkins. [I had] never heard of Wilkins and started looking at who he was. And frankly couldn’t believe that she was recommending this book. … It is an objectively pro-slavery book and one of the most startling things I learned about her in this piece.

    — On today’s Fresh Air, New Yorker writer Ryan Lizza talks about the books, writers and beliefs that have shaped Michele Bachmann.

  2. ryan lizza

    the new yorker

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