1. We would like to know the story of how this photograph came to be.
via Errol Morris

    We would like to know the story of how this photograph came to be.

    via Errol Morris

  2. Marilyn Monroe

    Lincoln

    Errol Morris

    Afternoon Photo Break

  1. Geoff Nunberg looks at how the language of the past is used and abused in the pop culture of the present:

Spotting linguistic anachronisms in Julian Fellowes’ Downton Abbey is as easy as shooting grouse in a barrel. “I couldn’t care less,” Lord Grantham says. Thomas complains that “our lot always gets shafted.” Cousin Matthew announces he’s been on a steep learning curve, a phrase that would have been gotten a blank reception even in the Sterling Cooper boardroom.

Disclaimer: the above are not direct Downton Abbey quotes.
Image via Telegrams from Downton View in High-Res

    Geoff Nunberg looks at how the language of the past is used and abused in the pop culture of the present:

    Spotting linguistic anachronisms in Julian Fellowes’ Downton Abbey is as easy as shooting grouse in a barrel. “I couldn’t care less,” Lord Grantham says. Thomas complains that “our lot always gets shafted.” Cousin Matthew announces he’s been on a steep learning curve, a phrase that would have been gotten a blank reception even in the Sterling Cooper boardroom.

    Disclaimer: the above are not direct Downton Abbey quotes.


    Image via Telegrams from Downton

  2. Fresh Air

    Reviews

    Geoff Nunberg

    Anachronisms

    Downton Abbey

    Lincoln

    Mad Men

  1. Tony Kushner talks to Terry Gross about the 16th president and writing the screenplay for Steven Spielberg’s Oscar-nominated film, ‘Lincoln’:

    I think that what Lincoln was doing at the end of war was a very, very smart thing. And it is maybe one of the great tragedies of American history that people didn’t take him literally after he was murdered. The inability to forgive and to reconcile with the South in a really decent and humane way, without any question, was one of the causes of the kind of resentment and perpetuation of alienation and bitterness that led to the quote-unquote ‘noble cause,’ and the rise of the Klan and Southern self-protection societies.

    The abuse of the South after they were defeated was a catastrophe, and helped lead to just unimaginable, untellable human suffering. So had Lincoln not been murdered, and had he really been able to guide Reconstruction, I think there’s a good reason to believe that he would have acted on those principles, because he meant them. We know that he meant them literally, because he told [Ulysses S.] Grant to behave accordingly.

  2. Fresh Air

    Interviews

    Tony Kushner

    Lincoln

    Steven Spielberg

    Civil War

  1. In honor of the approaching Academy Awards and in addition to the Wes Anderson interview, we’ll also be airing the Tony Kushner interview today. He’s up for Lincoln, which is a good excuse to share Lincoln’s calling card. He is ready to “dispense law, make jokes, split rails and perform other matters in a small way.”
laphamsquarterly:


“I have not inquired at what period of time the use of intoxicating liquors commenced, nor is it important to know. It is sufficient that to all of us who now inhabit the world, the practice of drinking them is just as old as the world itself—that is, we have seen the one just as long as we have seen the other.”

Don’t expect Abraham Lincoln to hand you his business card in a tavern.
View in High-Res

    In honor of the approaching Academy Awards and in addition to the Wes Anderson interview, we’ll also be airing the Tony Kushner interview today. He’s up for Lincoln, which is a good excuse to share Lincoln’s calling card. He is ready to “dispense law, make jokes, split rails and perform other matters in a small way.”

    laphamsquarterly:

    I have not inquired at what period of time the use of intoxicating liquors commenced, nor is it important to know. It is sufficient that to all of us who now inhabit the world, the practice of drinking them is just as old as the world itself—that is, we have seen the one just as long as we have seen the other.”

    Don’t expect Abraham Lincoln to hand you his business card in a tavern.

  2. Lapham's Quarterly

    Lincoln

    Tony Kushner

  1. Although there are no interpretations of Lincoln that say that he was a bad person, or a person who at one point loved slavery and changed his mind — [interpretations] that make any sense to me and that I think are in any way credible — there are certainly various versions of Lincoln and aspects of Lincoln. Like for instance his melancholy (which I don’t think he was) that are legitimate readings of him, and everybody has to pick their own. … Many people who knew him, including most of his closest friends, talk about how isolated and lonely and strange he was.

    And I would imagine Shakespeare and Mozart and Albert Einstein were also very strange. I think it must be very hard to have a cognitive process that really only in some ways resembles the cognitive processes of most of your fellow human beings. And the ability to see things that no one else can see, on one level, is a blessing — it’s certainly a blessing for the rest of us when something is made of it — but it also must be a kind of curse, because it seals you up in a world that only you can see.

    I mean, he was famously a joker, and a person who told stories, and a person who laughed and talked about how he had to laugh. He loved Shakespeare, and he loved Robert Burns, who were both writers who combine real heartbreak and tragedy with incredible humor and wit. And Lincoln said, ‘I couldn’t survive what I’m going through if I couldn’t laugh.’

    I don’t think he was a depressed person. I think he was a man with an enormous capacity for grief that didn’t deprive him of the ability to act. And he felt no need to hide the fact that he was grieving — and in fact saw, as the president of the United States, a duty to talk to the country about its grief during a time when we now think as many as 800,000 men in a country of 30 million died in combat in a four-year period.

    — Tony Kushner on the many interpretations of Abraham Lincoln

  2. Tony Kushner

    Lincoln

    Fresh Air

  1. On tap for today: Tony Kushner, who wrote the screenplay for the new Steven Spielberg film, “Lincoln.” Kushner won a Pulitzer in 1993 for his play “Angels in America.” 
We’ll also hear from Doris Kearns Goodwin, whose biography “Team of Rivals” was the basis for the movie.
(Illustration by Ricardo Martinez as seen in The New Yorker)

    On tap for today: Tony Kushner, who wrote the screenplay for the new Steven Spielberg film, “Lincoln.” Kushner won a Pulitzer in 1993 for his play “Angels in America.” 

    We’ll also hear from Doris Kearns Goodwin, whose biography “Team of Rivals” was the basis for the movie.

    (Illustration by Ricardo Martinez as seen in The New Yorker)

  2. Lincoln

    Tony Kushner

    Fresh Air

  1. Two icons, Abraham Lincoln and James Bond, make triumphant appearances this week in movies with more in common than you’d expect. True, Lincoln is a titan of history, liberator of slaves and as such an adversary of Western colonialism, while 007 is an outlandish stereotype embodying white male Western authoritarian power. But the makers of these films do a sterling job of testing their respective subjects in front of our eyes — before pronouncing them fit to carry on in our collective imagination.

    — David Edelstein reviews the films, Lincoln and Skyfall

    Photos courtesy of Francois Duhamel/Sony Pictures and David James/DreamWork

  2. Lincoln

    Skyfall

    David Edelstein

    Fresh Air