1. Jack Bishop and Bridget Lancaster of America’s Test Kitchen share with us their recipe for making iced coffee:
Cold-Brew Coffee ConcentrateMakes about 11/2 cups; enough for 3 cups iced coffeeStart today, enjoy tomorrow    9    ounces medium-roast coffee beans, ground coarse (31/2 cups)    31/2    cups filtered water, room temperature        Kosher salt (optional)1. Stir coffee and water together in large (about 2‑quart) glass French press. Allow raft of ground coffee to form, about 10 minutes, then stir again to recombine. Cover with plastic wrap and let sit at room temperature for 24 hours.
2. Line fine-mesh strainer with coffee filter and set over large liquid measuring cup. Place lid on press and slowly and evenly press plunger down on grounds to separate them from coffee concentrate. Pour concentrate into prepared strainer. Line large bowl with triple layer of cheesecloth that overhangs edges. Transfer grounds to cheesecloth. Gather edges of cheesecloth together and twist; then, holding pouch over strainer, firmly squeeze grounds until liquid no longer runs freely from pouch; discard grounds.
3. Using back of ladle or rubber spatula, gently stir concentrate to help filter it through strainer. Concentrate can be refrigerated in jar with tight-fitting lid for up to 3 days.
To Make Iced Coffee: Combine equal parts coffee concentrate and cold water. Add pinch kosher salt, if using, and pour into glass with ice.
More recipes HERE.

    Jack Bishop and Bridget Lancaster of America’s Test Kitchen share with us their recipe for making iced coffee:


    Cold-Brew Coffee Concentrate
    Makes about 11/2 cups; enough for 3 cups iced coffee
    Start today, enjoy tomorrow

        9    ounces medium-roast coffee beans, ground coarse (31/2 cups)
        31/2    cups filtered water, room temperature
            Kosher salt (optional)

    1. Stir coffee and water together in large (about 2‑quart) glass French press. Allow raft of ground coffee to form, about 10 minutes, then stir again to recombine. Cover with plastic wrap and let sit at room temperature for 24 hours.


    2. Line fine-mesh strainer with coffee filter and set over large liquid measuring cup. Place lid on press and slowly and evenly press plunger down on grounds to separate them from coffee concentrate. Pour concentrate into prepared strainer. Line large bowl with triple layer of cheesecloth that overhangs edges. Transfer grounds to cheesecloth. Gather edges of cheesecloth together and twist; then, holding pouch over strainer, firmly squeeze grounds until liquid no longer runs freely from pouch; discard grounds.


    3. Using back of ladle or rubber spatula, gently stir concentrate to help filter it through strainer. Concentrate can be refrigerated in jar with tight-fitting lid for up to 3 days.


    To Make Iced Coffee: Combine equal parts coffee concentrate and cold water. Add pinch kosher salt, if using, and pour into glass with ice.

    More recipes HERE.

  2. coffee

    recipes

    america's test kitchen

    jack bishop

    bridget lancaster

  1. Tomorrow, Jack Bishop and Bridget Lancaster of America’s Test Kitchen talk about recipes from their new book "D.I.Y. Cookbook" and answer questions from the Fresh Air team about summer grilling and other fresh ideas.
Hungry yet?

We will post recipes from their book on tomorrow’s NPR page. 
image via realfoodallergyfree View in High-Res

    Tomorrow, Jack Bishop and Bridget Lancaster of America’s Test Kitchen talk about recipes from their new book "D.I.Y. Cookbook" and answer questions from the Fresh Air team about summer grilling and other fresh ideas.

    Hungry yet?

    We will post recipes from their book on tomorrow’s NPR page. 

    image via realfoodallergyfree

  2. fresh air

    interview

    jack bishop

    bridget lancaster

    america's test kitchen

    grilling

    summer cooking

    peaches

    cookbook

    recipies

  1. Your classic marinade … is to use a bottle of Italian salad dressing. And … the common thinking is that the acid — the vinegar in the salad dressing, or lemon juice, or red wine — is somehow tenderizing the meat. And you will read this in a lot of classic cooking manuals, that an acidic marinade will make meat more tender.

    "It will, in fact, make the outer layer of the meat a bit mushy, but what it’s really doing is pulling moisture out of the meat and making it drier. And there isn’t really a great way to tenderize a cut that’s going to be cooking very quickly for instance on the grill, but you can make it juicier, and juiciness, when it gets to eating the steak, often is equated with tenderness once it’s in our mouth.

    "So we use a salt-based marinade; you can use salt itself, you can use a salty ingredient like soy sauce, and then mix that with the garlic, with all the seasonings you want to use. And what you’re basically doing is, the salt penetrates very quickly into the meat and changes the structure of the muscle proteins, so that when the muscle proteins are cooked, they will hold on to more of their juices."

    - Jack Bishop on the myth of marinades

    Photo credit: Larry Crowe/AP

  2. Marinades

    Jack Bishop

    Cook's Illustrated

    The Science of Good Cooking

    America's Test Kitchen

    Fresh Air