1. Fresh Air and the Golden Globe Nominees

    The Golden Globe nominations are out. Here is a list of nominees in key categories. Interviews and reviews are linked accordingly.

    MOVIES

    Best Picture, Drama:
    “12 Years a Slave”
    “Captain Phillips”
    “Gravity”
    “Philomena”
    “Rush”

    Best Picture, Musical or Comedy:
    “American Hustle”
    “Her”
    “Inside Llewyn Davis”
    “Nebraska”
    “The Wolf of Wall Street”

    Best Director:
    Alfonso Cuarón, “Gravity”
    Paul Greengrass, “Captain Phillips”
    Steve McQueen, “12 Years a Slave”
    Alexander Payne, “Nebraska”
    David O. Russell, “American Hustle”

    Best Actress, Drama:
    Cate Blanchett, “Blue Jasmine”
    Sandra Bullock, “Gravity”
    Judi Dench, “Philomena”
    Emma Thompson, “Saving Mr. Banks”
    Kate Winslet, “Labor Day”

    Best Actor, Drama:
    Chiwetel Ejiofor, “12 Years a Slave”
    Idris Elba, “Mandela: Long Walk to Freedom”
    Tom Hanks, “Captain Phillips”
    Matthew McConaughey, “Dallas Buyers Club”
    Robert Redford, “All Is Lost”

    Best Actor, Musical or Comedy:
    Christian Bale, “American Hustle”
    Bruce Dern, “Nebraska”
    Leonardo DiCaprio, “The Wolf of Wall Street”
    Oscar Isaac, “Inside Llewyn Davis”
    Joaquin Phoenix, “Her”

    Best Actress, Musical or Comedy:
    Amy Adams, “American Hustle”
    Julie Delpy, “Before Midnight”
    Greta Gerwig, “Frances Ha”
    Julia Louis-Dreyfus, “Enough Said”
    Meryl Streep, “August: Osage County”

    Best Supporting Actor
    Barkhad Abdi, “Captain Phillips”
    Daniel Brühl, “Rush”
    Bradley Cooper, “American Hustle”
    Michael Fassbender, “12 Years a Slave”
    Jared Leto, “Dallas Buyers Club”

    Best Supporting Actress
    Sally Hawkins, “Blue Jasmine”
    Jennifer Lawrence, “American Hustle”
    Lupita Nyong’o, “12 Years a Slave”
    Julia Roberts, “August: Osage County”
    June Squibb, “Nebraska”

    Best Foreign Language Film
    “Blue Is the Warmest Color”
    “The Great Beauty”
    “The Hunt”
    “The Past”
    “The Wind Rises”

    TELEVISION

    Best Drama
    “Breaking Bad” (AMC)
    “Downton Abbey” (PBS)
    “The Good Wife” (CBS)
    “House of Cards” (Netflix)
    “Masters of Sex” (Showtime)

    Best Comedy
    “The Big Bang Theory”
    “Brooklyn Nine-Nine”
    “Girls”
    “Modern Family”
    “Parks and Recreation”

    Best Television Movie or Mini-series
    “American Horror Story: Coven” (FX)
    “Behind the Candelabra” (HBO)
    “Dancing on the Edge” (Starz)
    “Top of the Lake” (Sundance)
    “White Queen” (Starz)

    Best Actor, Drama
    Bryan Cranston, “Breaking Bad”
    Liev Schreiber, “Ray Donovan”
    Michael Sheen, “Masters of Sex”
    Kevin Spacey, “House of Cards”
    James Spader, “The Blacklist”

    Best Actress, Drama
    Julianna Margulies, “The Good Wife”
    Tatiana Maslany “Orphan Black”
    Taylor Schilling, “Orange Is the New Black”
    Kerry Washington, “Scandal”
    Robin Wright, “House of Cards”

    Best Actor, Comedy
    Jason Bateman, “Arrested Development”
    Don Cheadle, “House of Lies”
    Michael J. Fox, “The Michael J. Fox Show”
    Jim Parsons, “The Big Bang Theory”
    Andy Samberg, “Brooklyn Nine-Nine”

    Best Actress, Comedy
    Zooey Deschanel, “New Girl”
    Lena Dunham, “Girls”
    Edie Falco, “Nurse Jackie”
    Julia Louis-Dreyfus, “Veep”
    Amy Poehler, “Parks and Recreation”

    Best Actor, Television Movie or Mini-series
    Matt Damon, “Behind the Candelabra”
    Michael Douglas, “Behind the Candelabra”
    Chiwetel Ejiofor, “Dancing on the Edge”
    Idris Elba, “Luther”
    Al Pacino, “Phil Spector”

    Best Actress, Television Movie or Mini-series
    Helen Bonham-Carter, “Burton and Taylor”
    Rebecca Ferguson, “White Queen”
    Jessica Lange, “American Horror Story: Coven”
    Helen Mirren, “Phil Spector”
    Elisabeth Moss, “Top of the Lake”

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  1. Posted on 4 December, 2013

    1,266 notes | Permalink

    Reblogged from nprbooks

    nprbooks:

YOU GUYS!! It’s ALIVE! The NPR Book Concierge is at your service — see what we’ve been working on the past few months, and more importantly, see our favorite books of 2013 in a fantastic new clickable searchable playable-with format. 
Want book club ideas that are also love stories? Funny cookbooks? Kids’ books for geeks? And of course, our own staff picks. Check it out!
(If you really, REALLY miss our lists, here’s why we decided to do something a little different this year)


Several of NPR’s best books of 2013 were featured as interviews or reviews (By Maureen Corrigan) on Fresh Air. To name a few:
Scott Anderson, the author of Lawrence In Arabia 
Jesmyn Ward, the author of Men We Reaped
Review of The Book of Ages 
Chimamanda Adichie, the author of Americanah
John Bradshaw, the author of Cat Sense
A. Scott Berg, the author of Wilson 
Allie Brosh, the author/artist of Hyperbole and a Half
Review of Someone 
Review of The Goldfinch 
Review of Miss Anne in Harlem
Review of The Love Affairs of Nathaniel P
Review of The Infatuations
Review of The Lowland 
View in High-Res

    nprbooks:

    YOU GUYS!! It’s ALIVE! The NPR Book Concierge is at your service — see what we’ve been working on the past few months, and more importantly, see our favorite books of 2013 in a fantastic new clickable searchable playable-with format

    Want book club ideas that are also love stories? Funny cookbooks? Kids’ books for geeks? And of course, our own staff picks. Check it out!

    (If you really, REALLY miss our lists, here’s why we decided to do something a little different this year)

    Several of NPR’s best books of 2013 were featured as interviews or reviews (By Maureen Corrigan) on Fresh Air. To name a few:

  2. fresh air

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  1. We have been receiving WONDERFUL responses to our earlier post:  Where were you when you heard _______ ‘s Fresh Air interview? (and on Facebook here. Scroll down a bit to see the post.)

    Several of our producers were reading your responses and Ann Marie Baldonado, one of our producers, told us a story that we just had to post: 

    "I remember listening to one particular episode of Fresh Air when I was in graduate school.  I was driving in my car, going to a bookstore to try and find a book I needed for a research paper.  I was not a very happy graduate student.  I remember hearing Terry interview radio producer David Isay, and two teenagers he worked with on a radio series about life in inner city Chicago.  Then Ken Tucker reviewed a new album by Sleater-Kinney.  My thought was, "Why the heck am I in grad school?  I should be working for a show like that!  A year later, I got my first job working for Fresh Air.  That was 16 years ago."

    — Ann Marie Baldonado

    Talk about a full circle moment.

  2. ann marie baldonado

    Fresh Air

    Interviews

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  1. Where were you when you heard _______ ‘s Fresh Air interview?

    Hey everyone,

    It’s time for a Fresh Air mixer!  This is Heidi, associate producer here at Fresh Air. In addition to producing public radio, I listen to it as well and so much of what makes an audio piece memorable to me is where I was when I heard it.  

    So, I thought we could get a mixer going by saying where you were or what you were doing when you heard ____’s Fresh Air interview.

    I’ll start: I was stuck in LA traffic (thankfully) when I heard Terry’s interview with Johnny Cash.

    Your turn.

  2. fresh air mixer

    fresh air

    interviews

  1. Gurus can’t be seen to fail by their followers. When that happens, that’s when the followers start to drift away. And some of Manson’s followers were leaving him, some of his long-term people that he counted on and depended on. So he needs to do something spectacular.

    — Author Jeff Guinn on why Charles Manson’s musical failure pushed him to find fame through murder

  2. Charles Manson

    Jeff Guinn

    Helter Skelter

    Fresh Air

    Interviews

  1. Author Jeff Guinn tells Terry Gross why location influenced Charles Manson’s success in recruiting followers —- 
Charles Manson is paroled from prison in California. Now, if he’s in Nebraska, let’s say, and he gets out of prison and goes to live in Omaha; if he tried to pull this shtick with the daughters of the farmers of Nebraska, they would’ve stuck him on a pitchfork and left him out in the field as a scarecrow.
But [San Francisco’s] Haight-Ashbury is the place where as many as 300 teenage waifs a day are drifting in. And Haight-Ashbury is overflowing with children who don’t know where they’re going, what they’re going to do … but they’ve come in search of some guru to be able to tell them what to do and make their lives better. And that’s who Manson preys on. Any other time, any other place, it could not have worked. But unfortunately for the world he was in the perfect spot to exploit his very terrible gifts.
Photo of Haight and Ashbury,San Francisco, 1969 via Ralph Ackerman View in High-Res

    Author Jeff Guinn tells Terry Gross why location influenced Charles Manson’s success in recruiting followers —- 

    Charles Manson is paroled from prison in California. Now, if he’s in Nebraska, let’s say, and he gets out of prison and goes to live in Omaha; if he tried to pull this shtick with the daughters of the farmers of Nebraska, they would’ve stuck him on a pitchfork and left him out in the field as a scarecrow.

    But [San Francisco’s] Haight-Ashbury is the place where as many as 300 teenage waifs a day are drifting in. And Haight-Ashbury is overflowing with children who don’t know where they’re going, what they’re going to do … but they’ve come in search of some guru to be able to tell them what to do and make their lives better. And that’s who Manson preys on. Any other time, any other place, it could not have worked. But unfortunately for the world he was in the perfect spot to exploit his very terrible gifts.

    Photo of Haight and Ashbury,San Francisco, 1969 via Ralph Ackerman

  2. Charles Manson

    haight ashbury

    san francisco

    Jeff Guinn

    Fresh Air

    Interviews

  1. I always thought competition was for horse races and it never belonged in art. I never felt that competitive with other girl singers, really. I admired them; if I really admired them, I would try to find a way, if it was appropriate, to figure out a way to sing with them. I liked Maria Muldaur when I first started out…Mainly, when I ran into Emmylou Harris, that was it, you know? We could finish each other’s sentences musically, and personally, too. We have a very shared, similar sensibility. And that was a friendship that really opened up a tremendous number of musical doors for me.

    — Linda Ronstadt talking with Terry Gross about competing against other female singers

  2. Linda Ronstadt

    fresh air

    emmylou harris

    maria muldaur

    interviews

  1. New York Times Congressional correspondent Jonathan Weisman addresses the clashes in Congress in the aftermath of Hurricane Sandy:

Jonathan Weisman: [Congress] almost couldn’t pass a hurricane relief bill. I don’t know if you remember, but Republican members of Congress for the northeast went on television and went to the House floor to denounce their fellow Republicans who they couldn’t believe were holding up a Disaster Relief Bill after a disaster of such magnitude. The Republican majority never really recovered from the showdown over [Hurricane] Sandy. Because at that point, that Sandy Relief Bill passed with a majority of Democrats voting for it and a minority or Republicans voting for it, and at that point conservatives in the House said, “No more, you are not going to let that happen, Mr. Boehner. Mr. Boehner you will only put bills on the floor that have the support of a majority of Republicans.” And once they made that demand he has not wavered from it.


image via The Heritage Network View in High-Res

    New York Times Congressional correspondent Jonathan Weisman addresses the clashes in Congress in the aftermath of Hurricane Sandy:

    Jonathan Weisman: [Congress] almost couldn’t pass a hurricane relief bill. I don’t know if you remember, but Republican members of Congress for the northeast went on television and went to the House floor to denounce their fellow Republicans who they couldn’t believe were holding up a Disaster Relief Bill after a disaster of such magnitude. The Republican majority never really recovered from the showdown over [Hurricane] Sandy. Because at that point, that Sandy Relief Bill passed with a majority of Democrats voting for it and a minority or Republicans voting for it, and at that point conservatives in the House said, “No more, you are not going to let that happen, Mr. Boehner. Mr. Boehner you will only put bills on the floor that have the support of a majority of Republicans.” And once they made that demand he has not wavered from it.

    image via The Heritage Network

  2. fresh air

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    jonathan weisman

    new york times

    hurricane sandy

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    John Boehner

  1. John Gallagher Jr. of HBO’s The Newsroom spoke to us about memorizing the fast-paced, verbose lines:

[M]ost of the rehearsal happens when I’m alone at home in my apartment. I’ll work on the scenes; I’ll walk around; I’ll try to say them out loud. Sometimes I’ll record myself saying all of the lines, even the characters that aren’t mine, and I’ll listen to that while I’m doing dishes or cooking dinner, doing something else just so that I’m trying to get it in my head in a way that doesn’t feel like work. I’ve always been able to listen to a song … once or twice and know all of the lyrics, and so I find sometimes getting audible cues in my head will help me learn it in a way that, I’ll go to rehearse it again and all of the sudden it will be in there. It will start being a little more effortless.
View in High-Res

    John Gallagher Jr. of HBO’s The Newsroom spoke to us about memorizing the fast-paced, verbose lines:

    [M]ost of the rehearsal happens when I’m alone at home in my apartment. I’ll work on the scenes; I’ll walk around; I’ll try to say them out loud. Sometimes I’ll record myself saying all of the lines, even the characters that aren’t mine, and I’ll listen to that while I’m doing dishes or cooking dinner, doing something else just so that I’m trying to get it in my head in a way that doesn’t feel like work. I’ve always been able to listen to a song … once or twice and know all of the lyrics, and so I find sometimes getting audible cues in my head will help me learn it in a way that, I’ll go to rehearse it again and all of the sudden it will be in there. It will start being a little more effortless.

  2. fresh air

    interviews

    john gallagher jr

    the newsroom

    hbo

    aaron sorkin

  1. Earlier this week, the nominees for this year’s Man Booker Prize were announced. Regarded as Britain’s most prestigious literary award, it’s given to an author in the former British Commonwealth, Ireland or Zimbabwe for what the judges consider the finest novel of the year.
 
On the list of 13 novels is Colm Toibin's The Testament of Mary.In the novel, Toibin imagines Mary’s life 20 years after the crucifixion of Jesus. She struggles to understand why some people believe Jesus is the son of God, and is weighed down by the guilt she feels about what she might have done differently to alter — or ease — her son’s fate.
 
Toibin grew up Catholic and, for a time, considered joining the priesthood. This changed upon his arrival at university, however, when exposure to new people and ideas soon led him to lose his faith. “I suppose I had been moving toward it without knowing,” Toibin tells Fresh Air's Terry Gross, “but, yeah, it went very quickly.”
The winner of the Man Booker Prize will be announced October 15th and for your ears, the Fresh Air interview with Colm Toibin.
 - Heidi
Image via Derek Spier/New York Times

    Earlier this week, the nominees for this year’s Man Booker Prize were announced. Regarded as Britain’s most prestigious literary award, it’s given to an author in the former British Commonwealth, Ireland or Zimbabwe for what the judges consider the finest novel of the year.

     

    On the list of 13 novels is Colm Toibin's The Testament of Mary.In the novel, Toibin imagines Mary’s life 20 years after the crucifixion of Jesus. She struggles to understand why some people believe Jesus is the son of God, and is weighed down by the guilt she feels about what she might have done differently to alter — or ease — her son’s fate.

     

    Toibin grew up Catholic and, for a time, considered joining the priesthood. This changed upon his arrival at university, however, when exposure to new people and ideas soon led him to lose his faith. “I suppose I had been moving toward it without knowing,” Toibin tells Fresh Air's Terry Gross, “but, yeah, it went very quickly.”

    The winner of the Man Booker Prize will be announced October 15th and for your ears, the Fresh Air interview with Colm Toibin.

     - Heidi

    Image via Derek Spier/New York Times

  2. colm toibin

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    the testament of mary.

  1. Bioethicist Peggy Battin is an advocate for the right-to-die. Her husband had a tragic accident that left him quadriplegic and reliant on breathing and feeding tubes. She discusses the complexity of wishing for life or death in the wake of a traumatic incident:

[Y]our sense of whether you want to continue or not … your circumstances are so altered, and altered by this phenomenon that doesn’t occur for most people in their ordinary lives; you don’t have all of your entire family and your entire range of friends all showering you with love all at once. That’s quite heady in a way. It’s quite wonderful. … You might even say it’s sublime and it’s extraordinary. That made a huge amount of difference at the beginning.

image via The Takeaway View in High-Res

    Bioethicist Peggy Battin is an advocate for the right-to-die. Her husband had a tragic accident that left him quadriplegic and reliant on breathing and feeding tubes. She discusses the complexity of wishing for life or death in the wake of a traumatic incident:

    [Y]our sense of whether you want to continue or not … your circumstances are so altered, and altered by this phenomenon that doesn’t occur for most people in their ordinary lives; you don’t have all of your entire family and your entire range of friends all showering you with love all at once. That’s quite heady in a way. It’s quite wonderful. … You might even say it’s sublime and it’s extraordinary. That made a huge amount of difference at the beginning.

    image via The Takeaway

  2. Fresh Air

    Interviews

    peggy battin

    right-to-die

    bioethics

    the takeaway

  1. Savage Continent author Keith Lowe tells Terry Gross about why there are so many movies and books about WWII in England

Well, it’s all about mythmaking, isn’t it? I mean every nationality after the war used the war to make myths about themselves. So for the British, for example, this is considered to be … ‘our finest hour.’ In the words of [Winston] Churchill, ‘This was our finest hour.’ We still believe this now. We think that this was when [the] British really showed what they were made of, they stood up against the might of Germany. They stood alone for it, which is kind of funny when you think of all of the empire resources we had, which were also backing us up: the Australians, the Canadians, the Indians.



And [in] America too, this was seen as … the good war. It was unambiguously a good war; you were fighting against this horrible, evil regime. Things seemed nice and clear-cut then. Now all of this is, of course, a big myth. Things weren’t clear-cut. They weren’t clear-cut for the British. They weren’t clear-cut for Americans either. There were all kinds of complications involved. But it’s nice for us; it’s cozy for us to remember it this way, because it makes us feel good about who we are and who we’ve become.
View in High-Res

    Savage Continent author Keith Lowe tells Terry Gross about why there are so many movies and books about WWII in England

    Well, it’s all about mythmaking, isn’t it? I mean every nationality after the war used the war to make myths about themselves. So for the British, for example, this is considered to be … ‘our finest hour.’ In the words of [Winston] Churchill, ‘This was our finest hour.’ We still believe this now. We think that this was when [the] British really showed what they were made of, they stood up against the might of Germany. They stood alone for it, which is kind of funny when you think of all of the empire resources we had, which were also backing us up: the Australians, the Canadians, the Indians.

    And [in] America too, this was seen as … the good war. It was unambiguously a good war; you were fighting against this horrible, evil regime. Things seemed nice and clear-cut then. Now all of this is, of course, a big myth. Things weren’t clear-cut. They weren’t clear-cut for the British. They weren’t clear-cut for Americans either. There were all kinds of complications involved. But it’s nice for us; it’s cozy for us to remember it this way, because it makes us feel good about who we are and who we’ve become.

  2. Fresh Air

    Interviews

    Keith Lowe

    Savage Continent

  1. Keith Lowe, author of Savage Continent, tells Terry Gross about what it was like in Europe after the end of World War II:

It’s difficult for us to quite realize how bad the destruction was. When officials went across Europe from London, they expected to find cities in states similar to that of London and Manchester, which had been bombed during the German Blitz. … Of course, when they arrived in places like Germany or Poland they saw that the damage was exponentially worse. So Warsaw, for example, was 90 percent destroyed, and this was just one city out of hundreds, all across Europe which had been almost … wiped off the face of the map.

Image of Warsaw, 1947 View in High-Res

    Keith Lowe, author of Savage Continent, tells Terry Gross about what it was like in Europe after the end of World War II:

    It’s difficult for us to quite realize how bad the destruction was. When officials went across Europe from London, they expected to find cities in states similar to that of London and Manchester, which had been bombed during the German Blitz. … Of course, when they arrived in places like Germany or Poland they saw that the damage was exponentially worse. So Warsaw, for example, was 90 percent destroyed, and this was just one city out of hundreds, all across Europe which had been almost … wiped off the face of the map.

    Image of Warsaw, 1947

  2. Fresh Air

    Interviews

    Keith Lowe

    Savage Continent

    World War II

    Warsaw

  1. Author David Gilbert on initially being drawn to stories about down-and-out characters:

The short stories I wrote in college and the early ones in my M.F.A. program were all about … people who were more on the fringe and kind of living desperate lives. [I] was also a big Raymond Carver fan. Denis Johnson was a huge influence on all of us in M.F.A. programs everywhere in the early ’90s. So we’re all trying to … ape that world, and that seemed so much more legitimate than my upbringing. So it took me a while to see that their story is everywhere, no matter … where you were raised, that we’re all basically living … the same tale, and I just took fathers and sons as that tale.
View in High-Res

    Author David Gilbert on initially being drawn to stories about down-and-out characters:

    The short stories I wrote in college and the early ones in my M.F.A. program were all about … people who were more on the fringe and kind of living desperate lives. [I] was also a big Raymond Carver fan. Denis Johnson was a huge influence on all of us in M.F.A. programs everywhere in the early ’90s. So we’re all trying to … ape that world, and that seemed so much more legitimate than my upbringing. So it took me a while to see that their story is everywhere, no matter … where you were raised, that we’re all basically living … the same tale, and I just took fathers and sons as that tale.

  2. Fresh Air

    Interviews

    David Gilbert

    And Sons

  1. David Gilbert, author of & Sons, tells Terry Gross about growing up privileged in New York City
"I was always trying to hide it. … Back then it was privilege with a much smaller ‘P.’ It wasn’t what it is today, there was no status involved with it, people weren’t … status-hunting. [Investment banking] was more like the everyday kind of job. But I always was a little bit — or very — insecure about it. I remember saying, ‘I live on the Upper East Side,’ and someone would say, ‘Oh, where do you live?’ and I’d be like, ‘75th Street.’ ‘Well, where?’ ‘75th and Park.’ You’d have to drag it out of me. I felt like, ‘75th and Park Avenue, ugh, I don’t want to be that guy.’ So I always had a pretty difficult relationship with it. Yet also, it was incredibly fortunate as well." View in High-Res

    David Gilbert, author of & Sons, tells Terry Gross about growing up privileged in New York City

    "I was always trying to hide it. … Back then it was privilege with a much smaller ‘P.’ It wasn’t what it is today, there was no status involved with it, people weren’t … status-hunting. [Investment banking] was more like the everyday kind of job. But I always was a little bit — or very — insecure about it. I remember saying, ‘I live on the Upper East Side,’ and someone would say, ‘Oh, where do you live?’ and I’d be like, ‘75th Street.’ ‘Well, where?’ ‘75th and Park.’ You’d have to drag it out of me. I felt like, ‘75th and Park Avenue, ugh, I don’t want to be that guy.’ So I always had a pretty difficult relationship with it. Yet also, it was incredibly fortunate as well."

  2. Fresh Air

    Interviews

    David Gilbert

    And Sons