1. New York Times Congressional correspondent Jonathan Weisman addresses the clashes in Congress in the aftermath of Hurricane Sandy:

Jonathan Weisman: [Congress] almost couldn’t pass a hurricane relief bill. I don’t know if you remember, but Republican members of Congress for the northeast went on television and went to the House floor to denounce their fellow Republicans who they couldn’t believe were holding up a Disaster Relief Bill after a disaster of such magnitude. The Republican majority never really recovered from the showdown over [Hurricane] Sandy. Because at that point, that Sandy Relief Bill passed with a majority of Democrats voting for it and a minority or Republicans voting for it, and at that point conservatives in the House said, “No more, you are not going to let that happen, Mr. Boehner. Mr. Boehner you will only put bills on the floor that have the support of a majority of Republicans.” And once they made that demand he has not wavered from it.


image via The Heritage Network View in High-Res

    New York Times Congressional correspondent Jonathan Weisman addresses the clashes in Congress in the aftermath of Hurricane Sandy:

    Jonathan Weisman: [Congress] almost couldn’t pass a hurricane relief bill. I don’t know if you remember, but Republican members of Congress for the northeast went on television and went to the House floor to denounce their fellow Republicans who they couldn’t believe were holding up a Disaster Relief Bill after a disaster of such magnitude. The Republican majority never really recovered from the showdown over [Hurricane] Sandy. Because at that point, that Sandy Relief Bill passed with a majority of Democrats voting for it and a minority or Republicans voting for it, and at that point conservatives in the House said, “No more, you are not going to let that happen, Mr. Boehner. Mr. Boehner you will only put bills on the floor that have the support of a majority of Republicans.” And once they made that demand he has not wavered from it.

    image via The Heritage Network

  2. fresh air

    interviews

    jonathan weisman

    new york times

    hurricane sandy

    congress

    John Boehner

  1. We’ve got approximately half as much sea ice in the Arctic in the fall now as we did say, 30 years or so ago — there’s been this dramatic decrease. There is emerging research — my colleagues and I published a paper last February on this — suggesting that as that sea ice melts it’s changing the jet stream, a current that steers weather in the mid-latitudes, places like New York. As sea ice melts, our research suggests that the jet stream is going to tend to get weaker. As the jet stream gets weaker, it’s easier for storms to stagnate or in some cases, maybe even move to the west, which is what this storm did.

    Most hurricanes, as they get as far north as a place like New York, especially late in the season — September, October — [the] standard pattern is for that strong jet stream to push those storms to the east. What we saw with this storm was that it moved to the west. It’s a very unusual track and I would say it’s a big research question whether we might see in general more stormy weather and storms taking a track like that as sea ice melts.

    — Dr. Radley Horton on melting sea ice and how it can steer hurricanes like Sandy in unusual directions

  2. Hurricane Sandy

    Fresh Air

    climate change

  1. Climate scientist Dr. Radley Horton on storms in the future:

Given the higher sea levels in the future, even if storms remain exactly the same, we’re going to get more frequent flooding events, maybe three times as many coastal flood events by the end of the century, just by virtue of having average sea levels be higher.

(Image: Reuters) View in High-Res

    Climate scientist Dr. Radley Horton on storms in the future:

    Given the higher sea levels in the future, even if storms remain exactly the same, we’re going to get more frequent flooding events, maybe three times as many coastal flood events by the end of the century, just by virtue of having average sea levels be higher.

    (Image: Reuters)

  2. climate change

    Hurricane Sandy

    Dr. Radley Horton

  1. Posted on 31 October, 2012

    3,424 notes | Permalink

    Reblogged from buzzfeedandrew

    Also up for today: we talk about Hurricane Sandy with Dr. Radley Horton, the climate science lead for the science policy team of the NYC Panel on Climate Change.
buzzfeedandrew:

A parking lot full of yellow cabs is flooded as a result of Hurricane Sandy in Hoboken. (AP)
View in High-Res

    Also up for today: we talk about Hurricane Sandy with Dr. Radley Horton, the climate science lead for the science policy team of the NYC Panel on Climate Change.

    buzzfeedandrew:

    A parking lot full of yellow cabs is flooded as a result of Hurricane Sandy in Hoboken. (AP)

  2. Hurricane Sandy

    Fresh Air

    climate change

  1. Posted on 30 October, 2012

    585 notes | Permalink

    Reblogged from npr

    npr:

InstaSnopes: Sorting the Real Sandy Photos From the Fakes - Alexis C. Madrigal - The Atlantic

Fact-check your Sandy photo stream. Try not to get too disappointed. View in High-Res

    npr:

    InstaSnopes: Sorting the Real Sandy Photos From the Fakes - Alexis C. Madrigal - The Atlantic

    Fact-check your Sandy photo stream. Try not to get too disappointed.

  2. Hurricane Sandy

    photography

  1. Weather the rest of Sandy (or at least, Sandy-related photos and coverage), with this interview on climate weirdness with science journalist Michael Lemonick and these other stories from NPR Books.
(Photo credit: Michael Lemonick)

    Weather the rest of Sandy (or at least, Sandy-related photos and coverage), with this interview on climate weirdness with science journalist Michael Lemonick and these other stories from NPR Books.

    (Photo credit: Michael Lemonick)

  2. Michael Lemonick

    Hurricane Sandy

  1. Posted on 30 October, 2012

    26,850 notes | Permalink

    Reblogged from noahkalina

    laughingsquid:
The Day After Yesterday
We’re back on the Tumblr/Twitter grid today. Hope everyone is safe out there! View in High-Res

    laughingsquid:

    The Day After Yesterday

    We’re back on the Tumblr/Twitter grid today. Hope everyone is safe out there!

  2. Hurricane Sandy