1. Fresh Air producer Ann Marie Baldonado checks in from the TriBeCa Film Festival: 

     


    Last night was a “Wait.  Who wrote this movie again?” evening at the TriBeCa film festival, with some well known names writing outside the genres for which they are known.

    Every Secret Thing is directed by Amy Berg, the Oscar nominated documentary film director (West of Memphis) who makes her fictional feature film debut here. More surprising though is the film’s writer— Nicole Holofcener, director of Please Give, Friends with Money,  and last year’s excellent movie Enough Said.  There aren’t struggles about privileged New Yorkers, rich Los Angelenos, or romantic love after divorce in this one.  Every Little Thing follows the story of two teenage girls who are convicted of kidnapping and murdering a baby when they were children themselves.  Now out of prison, they are again under suspicion when another girl goes missing in their town.  The film has a great cast, including Diane Lane, Elle Fanning, Elisabeth Banks, and relative new comer Danielle Macdonald.



    Also premiering last night was In Your Eyes, a small supernatural-y romantic film written by big name Joss Whedon (Buffy the Vampire Slayer, The Avengers.  It stars the lovely Zoe Kazan and Michael Stahl-David as two lost people living across the country from each other who have an unexplained, psychic and psychological connection that disrupts their very different lives.  Whedon didn’t direct this one, but it was put out by the small production company he started with his wife; it’s the same company that produced last year’s Joss directed Much Ado About Nothing, which starred almost everyone who has been in his other TV shows and movies. Okay, not really.  

    Whedon wasn’t physically present at last night’s premiere and Q & A, but they did play a video he recorded, in which he announced that the film that just premiered, In Your Eyes, was now available via VOD at inyoureyes.com.  5 bucks gets you a 72 hour rental.  It will be interesting to see how this unconventional way of distributing a small independent film will pan out. 

     

    (Stills from Every Secret Thing and In Your Eyes, via TriBeCa)

  2. TriBeCa film festival

    every secret thing

    in your eyes

    joss whedon

    film

    fresh air

  1. fresh air

  1. One of Amy Schumer’s comedy routines begins with the declaration, “I’m a little sluttier than the average bear. I really am.”
Degrees of sluttiness may be hard to define, but Schumer does talk frankly about many subjects — including sex — that can be uncomfortable for people, both in her stand-up act and on her Comedy Central series, Inside Amy Schumer, now in its second season. 
When Amy spoke with Terry Gross last year, she revealed why she’s so at ease talking about sex:  

"I have a joke where I say, ‘Oh, I’m going to bring [my mom] to a soccer game because I want to show her what boundaries look like.’ I just grew up in a house where things weren’t that taboo to talk about. And my mom, when she was teaching us to say our different body parts, taught me how to say ‘vagina’ the same that she taught me how to say ‘ear.’I think she wanted us to be able to tell her if we were ever molested without being embarrassed — and so there wasn’t this sense of shame. And I was running around naked to an age that probably wasn’t appropriate and just never was made to feel embarrassed or shamed because of my body or think anything was wrong with me, probably to a fault." 
View in High-Res

    One of Amy Schumers comedy routines begins with the declaration, “I’m a little sluttier than the average bear. I really am.”

    Degrees of sluttiness may be hard to define, but Schumer does talk frankly about many subjects — including sex — that can be uncomfortable for people, both in her stand-up act and on her Comedy Central series, Inside Amy Schumer, now in its second season. 

    When Amy spoke with Terry Gross last year, she revealed why she’s so at ease talking about sex:  

    "I have a joke where I say, ‘Oh, I’m going to bring [my mom] to a soccer game because I want to show her what boundaries look like.’ I just grew up in a house where things weren’t that taboo to talk about. And my mom, when she was teaching us to say our different body parts, taught me how to say ‘vagina’ the same that she taught me how to say ‘ear.’I think she wanted us to be able to tell her if we were ever molested without being embarrassed — and so there wasn’t this sense of shame. And I was running around naked to an age that probably wasn’t appropriate and just never was made to feel embarrassed or shamed because of my body or think anything was wrong with me, probably to a fault." 

  2. amy schumer

    inside amy schumer

    comedy central

    fresh air

    interview

  1. image

    Our producer Ann Marie Baldonado is attending the TriBeCa Film Festival this weekend to watch some movies and scout some future guests.  She says, “I seem to be  picking my first films based on my love of many current sitcoms.  Last night i saw the new film About Alex which starts Max Greenfield (Schmidt from The New Girl, among other things) Aubrey Plaza (Parks and Rec) and Jason Ritter.  This current day, Big Chill-ish film about a group of college friends who get back together when one friend is in trouble, was written and directed by Jesse Zwick, (writer on Parenthood and son of Edward Zwick).  Up later today, Alex of Venice, the directorial debut by Chris Messina (The Mindy Project, The Newsroom).

     I guess I am also just picking films with “Alex” in the title.”

  2. TriBeCa film festival

    fresh air

  1. Posted on 17 April, 2014

    394 notes | Permalink

    Reblogged from spacecadet

    Writer/director Mike Judge spoke to Fresh Air’s Dave Davies about his new HBO series Silicon Valley and his 1999 cult classic, Office Space. In the interview he tells us about where the boss character’s tagline of “… yeah,” came from: 

It wasn’t [based on] any specific person. It kind of came a few different ways. I worked at Whataburger which is a Texas-New Mexico chain, a burger place, and I worked at Jack-in-the-Box, this is when I was young. … The worst thing ever at both of those jobs is to change the fryers and the way that someone will say, “Yeah, um, Mike, why don’t you go ahead and change the fryers?” To say “go ahead” it’s like you were just chomping at the bit to go do it and I’m just gonna go cut you loose and go ahead — now it’s so common place. …
I think in the ’50s a boss would say “Hey Milton, move your desk. Thanks.” I don’t know if it’s the baby boom generation where everyone has to be cool, in the ’70s and ’80s it turned into, “Yeah … if I could get you just go ahead and move your desk,” And it’s this kind of “I’m casual, I’m cool. I’m not your ’50s boss.”
I would just prefer someone coming up and telling you what to do. I would respect that more. … Even over the years just noticing the “yeah” that means “no.” Like if you say, “Can I have Friday off?”
"Hmm … Yeah …"

    Writer/director Mike Judge spoke to Fresh Air’s Dave Davies about his new HBO series Silicon Valley and his 1999 cult classic, Office Space. In the interview he tells us about where the boss character’s tagline of “… yeah,” came from: 

    It wasn’t [based on] any specific person. It kind of came a few different ways. I worked at Whataburger which is a Texas-New Mexico chain, a burger place, and I worked at Jack-in-the-Box, this is when I was young. … The worst thing ever at both of those jobs is to change the fryers and the way that someone will say, “Yeah, um, Mike, why don’t you go ahead and change the fryers?” To say “go ahead” it’s like you were just chomping at the bit to go do it and I’m just gonna go cut you loose and go ahead — now it’s so common place. …

    I think in the ’50s a boss would say “Hey Milton, move your desk. Thanks.” I don’t know if it’s the baby boom generation where everyone has to be cool, in the ’70s and ’80s it turned into, “Yeah … if I could get you just go ahead and move your desk,” And it’s this kind of “I’m casual, I’m cool. I’m not your ’50s boss.”

    I would just prefer someone coming up and telling you what to do. I would respect that more. … Even over the years just noticing the “yeah” that means “no.” Like if you say, “Can I have Friday off?”

    "Hmm … Yeah …"

  2. mike judge

    silicon valley

    office space

    interview

    fresh air

  1. The Both is the name for the duo formed by the veteran singer-songwriters Aimee Mann and Ted Leo. The Both is also the name of their debut album. The two began performing together in 2012, when Ted Leo was Mann’s opening act. Mann began joining Leo onstage during his set. They liked the sound their voices made together, and started collaborating. Fresh Air rock critic Ken Tucker has a review of The Both:




As separate acts, Ted Leo is generally considered a punk-influenced indie musician for the work he’s done with his band the Pharmacists, and Aimee Mann as a sensitive singer-songwriter ever since she left the pop star life with the group ‘Til Tuesday in the 1980s. But of course both of these musicians are more than their genre categories. What their work as The Both suggests is that together they’ve found common ground in confidently precise, propulsive melodies and lyrics that twist with oblique cleverness.

“Milwaukee” is one of the first songs Mann and Leo collaborated on in gradually hatching this plan to perform and record together as The Both. They bring out the best in each other musically: Leo gives Mann zip and vigor; she gives him poetry and hard-headedness. Sometimes one of them takes the lead vocal, at other times they trade off lines and harmonize throughout. 

In interviews, Aimee Mann has said working with Ted Leo has made her feel as though she’s in a rock band for the first time, which must make her old bandmates in ‘Til Tuesday feel a tad dismayed. But if anything, The Both includes some of the most Aimee Mannish of Aimee Mann songs, the way her best singing captures an urgent longing and pessimism that is redeemed by a prickly self-awareness.

The Both works so well as an album because its songs cohere as the documentation of the ways a new creative partnership revitalizes the familiar habits, tics, tricks, and talents of the collaborators. It sets their individual talents in a new context that compels the listener to form a new appreciation for these musicians. They may begin the album singing about a gamble that didn’t pay off, but their own musical collusion really has. 

 

Photo cred Christian Lantry/Super Ego Records View in High-Res

    The Both is the name for the duo formed by the veteran singer-songwriters Aimee Mann and Ted Leo. The Both is also the name of their debut album. The two began performing together in 2012, when Ted Leo was Mann’s opening act. Mann began joining Leo onstage during his set. They liked the sound their voices made together, and started collaborating. Fresh Air rock critic Ken Tucker has a review of The Both:

    As separate acts, Ted Leo is generally considered a punk-influenced indie musician for the work he’s done with his band the Pharmacists, and Aimee Mann as a sensitive singer-songwriter ever since she left the pop star life with the group ‘Til Tuesday in the 1980s. But of course both of these musicians are more than their genre categories. What their work as The Both suggests is that together they’ve found common ground in confidently precise, propulsive melodies and lyrics that twist with oblique cleverness.

    Milwaukee” is one of the first songs Mann and Leo collaborated on in gradually hatching this plan to perform and record together as The Both. They bring out the best in each other musically: Leo gives Mann zip and vigor; she gives him poetry and hard-headedness. Sometimes one of them takes the lead vocal, at other times they trade off lines and harmonize throughout. 

    In interviews, Aimee Mann has said working with Ted Leo has made her feel as though she’s in a rock band for the first time, which must make her old bandmates in ‘Til Tuesday feel a tad dismayed. But if anything, The Both includes some of the most Aimee Mannish of Aimee Mann songs, the way her best singing captures an urgent longing and pessimism that is redeemed by a prickly self-awareness.

    The Both works so well as an album because its songs cohere as the documentation of the ways a new creative partnership revitalizes the familiar habits, tics, tricks, and talents of the collaborators. It sets their individual talents in a new context that compels the listener to form a new appreciation for these musicians. They may begin the album singing about a gamble that didn’t pay off, but their own musical collusion really has.

     

    Photo cred Christian Lantry/Super Ego Records

  2. the both

    aimee mann

    ted leo

    review

    fresh air

    ken tucker

  1. Ryan Gosling directed his first film, Lost River. It was just announced that it will be premiering at the Cannes Film Festival next month.  
(Hear Fresh Air’s interview with Gosling, while you’re at it)

    Ryan Gosling directed his first film, Lost River. It was just announced that it will be premiering at the Cannes Film Festival next month.  

    (Hear Fresh Air’s interview with Gosling, while you’re at it)

  2. ryan gosling

    cannes film festival

    fresh air

    interview

    film

  1. Dr. Martin Blaser is an expert on the human microbiome, which is the collection of bacteria, viruses, fungi and other microbes that live in and on the body. In fact, about 70 to 90 percent of all the cells in the human body aren’t human at all — they’re micro-organisms. 
Blaser is the author of Missing Microbes, and speculates that overuse of antibiotics causes food allergies, asthma, and intestinal disorders.
If antibiotics are wiping out these micro-organisms, then probiotics are putting some of them back in. 
Here’s what Dr. Blaser says about the use of probiotics: 

"There are many different probiotics. If you go to the grocery store, the health food store, the drugstore, there are shelves and shelves full of probiotics [with] different names, different compositions. I think I can say three things: The first is that they’re almost completely unregulated; second is that they seem to be generally safe; and third is that they’re mostly untested about the important reasons that people even want to take probiotics because they don’t feel well or they have particular symptoms …
Right now, it’s the Wild West. I’m actually a big believer in probiotics; I think that’s going to be part of the future of medicine, that we’re going to understand the science of the microbiome well enough so that we can look at a sample from a child and say this child is lacking such-and-such an organism and now we’re going to take it off the shelf and we’re going to give it back to that child … Just as today the kids are lining up for the vaccines, in the future, maybe the kids are going to be drinking certain organisms so that we can replace the ones that they’ve lost.”
View in High-Res

    Dr. Martin Blaser is an expert on the human microbiome, which is the collection of bacteria, viruses, fungi and other microbes that live in and on the body. In fact, about 70 to 90 percent of all the cells in the human body aren’t human at all — they’re micro-organisms. 

    Blaser is the author of Missing Microbes, and speculates that overuse of antibiotics causes food allergies, asthma, and intestinal disorders.

    If antibiotics are wiping out these micro-organisms, then probiotics are putting some of them back in. 

    Here’s what Dr. Blaser says about the use of probiotics: 

    "There are many different probiotics. If you go to the grocery store, the health food store, the drugstore, there are shelves and shelves full of probiotics [with] different names, different compositions. I think I can say three things: The first is that they’re almost completely unregulated; second is that they seem to be generally safe; and third is that they’re mostly untested about the important reasons that people even want to take probiotics because they don’t feel well or they have particular symptoms …

    Right now, it’s the Wild West. I’m actually a big believer in probiotics; I think that’s going to be part of the future of medicine, that we’re going to understand the science of the microbiome well enough so that we can look at a sample from a child and say this child is lacking such-and-such an organism and now we’re going to take it off the shelf and we’re going to give it back to that child … Just as today the kids are lining up for the vaccines, in the future, maybe the kids are going to be drinking certain organisms so that we can replace the ones that they’ve lost.”

  2. medicine

    science

    research

    probiotics

    microbiome

    dr. martin blaser

    microbes

    allergies

    interview

    fresh air

  1. Posted on 11 April, 2014

    452 notes | Permalink

    Reblogged from notesondesign

    We’re outta here.  
Have a great weekend,
Fresh Air

    We’re outta here.  

    Have a great weekend,

    Fresh Air

  2. Weekend

    let's go somewhere

    fresh air

    friday

  1. By now you’ve probably heard the song “Let It Go" from Frozen more than a few times—and you’ve probably gotten it stuck in your head, too. That’s the work of songwriters Kristen Anderson-Lopez and Robert Lopez, the Oscar-winning couple behind the Disney mega-hit.  Robert also co-wrote the satirical musicals The Book of Mormon and Avenue Q.  In the interview, Kristen tells Fresh Air why she set out to write a different kind of princess story: 

    Kristen Anderson-Lopez: If you have the deluxe CD you will see my very strong, strike-across-the-bow at all princess myth things in the form of a song called “We Know Better,” which was a song that was cut, but it basically was these two princesses bonding over all of the things that the world expects and thinks of them. [The world thinks] that they’re perfect and sweet and sugar and spice and all things nice and it was the two of them misbehaving and being fully well-rounded children with all the good and bad and imagination and mischief that I really feel that it’s important for our girls to be allowed to be.

    It got cut, but you can tell the whole movie is full of this point of view as much as Jennifer Lee and I could put in it, because we’re both Park Slope moms, we both went through the 90s, we took the women’s studies courses, and I knew I wouldn’t be able to push my kids on the swing at the playground if I had written a movie where the girl wore the puffy dress and was saved not by anything active she did but by being beautiful enough to be kissed by a prince.

    Photo (Carolyn Cole / Los Angeles Times) and Disney

  2. frozen

    disney

    interview

    fresh air

    kristen anderson-lopez

    robert lopez

    feminism

  1. Big news: CBS just announced Stephen Colbert will replace David Letterman on The Late Show next year. Thoughts?

    You can hear the 2012 Fresh Air interview here

  2. stephen colbert

    the late show

    the colbert report

    fresh air

    interview

    terry gross

  1. Idina Menzel performs Let It Go from Frozen with Jimmy Fallon and The Roots.

    Thursday 4/10: We speak to songwriters Robert Lopez and Kristen Anderson Lopez who wrote the music for the Disney movie Frozen (including Let It Go).  Robert Lopez also co-created the musicals The Book of Mormon and Avenue Q.  

  2. frozen

    disney

    book of mormon

    avenue q

    let it go

    musical

    interview

    fresh air

  1. Edie Falco, star of the Showtime series Nurse Jackie, joins Fresh Air to discuss life in scrubs, addiction, and the years she spent as Carmela Soprano on The Sopranos. Like her character Jackie, Falco herself struggles with addiction. Terry asked if that’s what made her interested in the role: 

"I have to say, I never really know what makes me want to do a role. It’s some sort of wordless place, you know? I imagine that everything I’ve ever been through is contributing on some level to the decisions I make, but I’m not privy to them. …
The addiction piece, I have to say, is a huge part of my life. Not just my own, but that of many people I love. The helplessness around that, and learning to deal with that, and all the various 12-step programs I’ve been a part of over the years, and how much they’ve helped me, and how hard it is to love somebody who is going through that, and remain distant enough to not let it crush you each time. All that stuff is of tremendous interest to me. That keeps me very deeply involved in Jackie’s journey.”

    Edie Falco, star of the Showtime series Nurse Jackie, joins Fresh Air to discuss life in scrubs, addiction, and the years she spent as Carmela Soprano on The Sopranos. Like her character Jackie, Falco herself struggles with addiction. Terry asked if that’s what made her interested in the role: 

    "I have to say, I never really know what makes me want to do a role. It’s some sort of wordless place, you know? I imagine that everything I’ve ever been through is contributing on some level to the decisions I make, but I’m not privy to them. …

    The addiction piece, I have to say, is a huge part of my life. Not just my own, but that of many people I love. The helplessness around that, and learning to deal with that, and all the various 12-step programs I’ve been a part of over the years, and how much they’ve helped me, and how hard it is to love somebody who is going through that, and remain distant enough to not let it crush you each time. All that stuff is of tremendous interest to me. That keeps me very deeply involved in Jackie’s journey.”

  2. nurse jackie

    addiction

    sobriety

    edie falco

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  1. Tomorrow: Edie Falco joins us for the first time since The Sopranos to talk about her show Nurse Jackie, parenting, and addiction.  View in High-Res

    Tomorrow: Edie Falco joins us for the first time since The Sopranos to talk about her show Nurse Jackie, parenting, and addiction. 

  2. edie falco

    nurse jackie

    nursing

    addiction

    fresh air

    interview

    the sopranos

  1. In light of yesterday’s announcement that David Letterman will be retiring, we thought we’d share this great tribute by Tina Fey, at the Kennedy Center Honors in 2012.

    And don’t forget this memorable tribute by Jimmy Kimmel from that same night.

    (Kimmel actually talks about that tribute in his Fresh Air interview)

    Also, Terry spoke to David Letterman in 1981 back when Fresh Air was a local show and Letterman was just getting started:

    "If you do one show a year or one show every three months or one show every four months, you have an awful lot of time to realize what a failure you’ve been.  But we do kind of a baseball season: We do a show one night and we hope it’s wonderful, and if not that, we hope it’s good and we hope it isn’t bad. But even if it’s a great show or even if it’s not such a good show, we do another show the next night and we have no time, except in self analysis, to decide why it wasn’t good or even why it was very good."

  2. david letterman

    tina fey

    jimmy kimmel

    comedy

    late night

    fresh air

    interview