1. Sammy Cahn had his most successful and enduring partnerships with composers Saul Chaplin, Jule Styne and Jimmy Van Heusen.  Several of his songs were written for Frank Sinatra.  He died in 1993, at the age of 79.  

Terry Gross spoke with Sammy Cahn in 1985 where he sings his songs at the slightest provocation.  And when he was commissioned to write a song for a particular singer, he would insist on performing it for him (or her?) to show what he had in mind.  When it was time to demonstrate a song for a great singer, Cahn never lacked confidence, even if the singer was Frank Sinatra.


image via Oscar Collections View in High-Res

    Sammy Cahn had his most successful and enduring partnerships with composers Saul Chaplin, Jule Styne and Jimmy Van Heusen.  Several of his songs were written for Frank Sinatra.  He died in 1993, at the age of 79. 

    Terry Gross spoke with Sammy Cahn in 1985 where he sings his songs at the slightest provocation.  And when he was commissioned to write a song for a particular singer, he would insist on performing it for him (or her?) to show what he had in mind.  When it was time to demonstrate a song for a great singer, Cahn never lacked confidence, even if the singer was Frank Sinatra.

    image via Oscar Collections

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  1. Jazz guitarist, singer and songwriter, John Pizzarelli, on what it was like to tour with — and open for — Frank Sinatra:



The funny thing was in Atlantic City, after the gigs, and you’d be hanging around the hotel and people thought you really … were hanging out with Frank, so they would come up to you and say, “I’ve got this song about Hoboken. You’ve got to give it to Frank.” And I was like, “You know, you have to understand, I’m lucky if I see Frank Sinatra in the wings before the show.” … I spoke to him once before the show in Berlin. It was a rather funny meeting because Hank Cattaneo, who ran everything, felt it was the right time to go say hello to Frank and when … he was going to introduce me, he got nervous and messed the whole thing up. … [H]e sort of coughed out the words “opening act” to Frank Sinatra and I swung around and shook his hand and said, “It’s nice to meet you.” I was about to walk away and Frank said to me, “Eat something. You look bad,” and that was pretty much all I got out of Frank Sinatra the whole tour.



Image Michael Ochs Archives/Getty Images via NPR View in High-Res

    Jazz guitarist, singer and songwriter, John Pizzarelli, on what it was like to tour with — and open for — Frank Sinatra:

    The funny thing was in Atlantic City, after the gigs, and you’d be hanging around the hotel and people thought you really … were hanging out with Frank, so they would come up to you and say, “I’ve got this song about Hoboken. You’ve got to give it to Frank.” And I was like, “You know, you have to understand, I’m lucky if I see Frank Sinatra in the wings before the show.” … I spoke to him once before the show in Berlin. It was a rather funny meeting because Hank Cattaneo, who ran everything, felt it was the right time to go say hello to Frank and when … he was going to introduce me, he got nervous and messed the whole thing up. … [H]e sort of coughed out the words “opening act” to Frank Sinatra and I swung around and shook his hand and said, “It’s nice to meet you.” I was about to walk away and Frank said to me, “Eat something. You look bad,” and that was pretty much all I got out of Frank Sinatra the whole tour.

    Image Michael Ochs Archives/Getty Images via NPR

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