1. Posted on 17 December, 2013

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    Reblogged from movieshift

    wnyc:

Is black-and-white back? 
This year has seen so many black-and-white films, it’s like the old technique has become a new trend. “The reality of making a black-and-white film,” says Greta Gerwig, the star and co-writer of Frances Ha, “is that someone might buy it to distribute it after it was made, but no one would go tell you to make a black-and-white movie with their money.”
Studio 360 explores the resurgence with the filmmakers of Frances Ha, Much Ado About Nothing, and Nebraska:



In the Fresh Air interview with Noah Baumbach (the director of Frances Ha) he talked about his choice to film in black and white:


Shooting [in black and white] in New York helped me … see the city with new eyes, I think. Also there was something about black and white that makes the movie almost immediately nostalgic.
"It’s a very contemporary story, and Frances is such a contemporary character. … [Y]ou never know [when you reach] that moment when [something is] over, and I think that black and white in some ways sort of underscores that. It adds this sort of sense of past to something that’s happening very much in the present."

    wnyc:

    Is black-and-white back?

    This year has seen so many black-and-white films, it’s like the old technique has become a new trend. “The reality of making a black-and-white film,” says Greta Gerwig, the star and co-writer of Frances Ha, “is that someone might buy it to distribute it after it was made, but no one would go tell you to make a black-and-white movie with their money.”

    Studio 360 explores the resurgence with the filmmakers of Frances Ha, Much Ado About Nothing, and Nebraska:

    In the Fresh Air interview with Noah Baumbach (the director of Frances Ha) he talked about his choice to film in black and white:

    Shooting [in black and white] in New York helped me … see the city with new eyes, I think. Also there was something about black and white that makes the movie almost immediately nostalgic.

    "It’s a very contemporary story, and Frances is such a contemporary character. … [Y]ou never know [when you reach] that moment when [something is] over, and I think that black and white in some ways sort of underscores that. It adds this sort of sense of past to something that’s happening very much in the present."

    (Source: movieshift)

  2. frances ha

    nebraska

    noah baumbach

    greta gerwig

    black and white

  1. Actor Greta Gerwig talks to Terry Gross about on weight and her character, Florence, in the Noah Baumbach film Greenberg:

Right before my senior year I lost an incredible amount of weight due to chain smoking and really poor personal behavior and I felt so wonderful and I wished it didn’t feel as wonderful as it does and it felt liberating and I felt great about myself and people asked me, ‘Did you get a haircut?’ and I was like, ‘No, I lost 25 pounds, you idiot.’ … I think it also gave me the confidence to kind of go make these movies and do all this stuff because I was high on some kind of thinness. And then when I read the part of Florence I almost felt ashamed because I felt like had been trying to run away from being that person because I thought that that’s what I had to do to make movies and then when I read that part I gained 15, 17, 20 pounds for the part because I knew that was right and I’ve never really lost it. I’ve just kind of stayed that weight. But I think it was like when I read the script I understood it and I also felt like, ‘Oh, you didn’t have to try to be another person to make art or to be an actress. You can be this person and someone will want to tell that story.’”
View in High-Res

    Actor Greta Gerwig talks to Terry Gross about on weight and her character, Florence, in the Noah Baumbach film Greenberg:

    Right before my senior year I lost an incredible amount of weight due to chain smoking and really poor personal behavior and I felt so wonderful and I wished it didn’t feel as wonderful as it does and it felt liberating and I felt great about myself and people asked me, ‘Did you get a haircut?’ and I was like, ‘No, I lost 25 pounds, you idiot.’ … I think it also gave me the confidence to kind of go make these movies and do all this stuff because I was high on some kind of thinness. And then when I read the part of Florence I almost felt ashamed because I felt like had been trying to run away from being that person because I thought that that’s what I had to do to make movies and then when I read that part I gained 15, 17, 20 pounds for the part because I knew that was right and I’ve never really lost it. I’ve just kind of stayed that weight. But I think it was like when I read the script I understood it and I also felt like, ‘Oh, you didn’t have to try to be another person to make art or to be an actress. You can be this person and someone will want to tell that story.’”

  2. Fresh Air

    Interviews

    Greta Gerwig

    Greenberg

    Noah Baumbach

    Frances Ha

  1. Greta Gerwig talks to Terry Gross about working with one of her idols — Woody Allen — on his film To Rome with Love: 

Whenever you work with someone who you idolize, you realize … he’s just a person trying to make a movie as best he knows how and that doesn’t look so different from other people trying to do the same thing. And he’s wildly smart and brilliant and funny, but it’s moviemaking and there’s something kind of democratic about how difficult it is because everybody — whether you’re Woody Allen or Noah or P.T. Anderson — it’s hard. Making movies is a hard thing and it’s slow. So you can glorify the product, but the process is difficult no matter who you are.”

Image of Gerwig and Allen at the premiere for To Rome with Love via The Hollywood Reporter View in High-Res

    Greta Gerwig talks to Terry Gross about working with one of her idols — Woody Allen — on his film To Rome with Love:

    Whenever you work with someone who you idolize, you realize … he’s just a person trying to make a movie as best he knows how and that doesn’t look so different from other people trying to do the same thing. And he’s wildly smart and brilliant and funny, but it’s moviemaking and there’s something kind of democratic about how difficult it is because everybody — whether you’re Woody Allen or Noah or P.T. Anderson — it’s hard. Making movies is a hard thing and it’s slow. So you can glorify the product, but the process is difficult no matter who you are.”

    Image of Gerwig and Allen at the premiere for To Rome with Love via The Hollywood Reporter

  2. Fresh Air

    Interviews

    Greta Gerwig

    Noah Baumbach

    Woody Allen

    Frances Ha

    To Rome with Love

  1. Director Noah Baumbach tells Terry Gross why he decided to shoot Frances Ha in black in white:

I wanted to shoot in New York again and I didn’t really articulate a reason beyond that except that shooting that way in New York helped me … see the city with new eyes, I think. Also there was something about black and white that makes the movie almost immediately nostalgic. It’s a very contemporary story and Frances is such a contemporary character. … [Y]ou never know that moment when [something is] over and I think that black and white in some ways sort of underscores that. It adds this sort of sense of past to something that’s happening very much in the present.”

Image of Greta Gerwig (right) as Frances and Mickey Sumner as Sophie in Frances Ha View in High-Res

    Director Noah Baumbach tells Terry Gross why he decided to shoot Frances Ha in black in white:

    I wanted to shoot in New York again and I didn’t really articulate a reason beyond that except that shooting that way in New York helped me … see the city with new eyes, I think. Also there was something about black and white that makes the movie almost immediately nostalgic. It’s a very contemporary story and Frances is such a contemporary character. … [Y]ou never know that moment when [something is] over and I think that black and white in some ways sort of underscores that. It adds this sort of sense of past to something that’s happening very much in the present.”

    Image of Greta Gerwig (right) as Frances and Mickey Sumner as Sophie in Frances Ha

  2. Fresh Air

    Interviews

    Noah Baumbach

    Greta Gerwig

    Frances Ha

  1. Take 20 (3:02 p.m.): I’m making a meal out of drying my hands with the paper towel. I am drying them too vigorously, enjoying having a prop far too much. It has become a crutch.

    — 

    Greta Gerwig on "One Scene, 42 Takes and 2 Hours In A Bathroom Stall" in which she dissects the takes it took to get the right take in the movie Frances Ha that she co-wrote with director Noah Baumbach. Her thoughts on the other 42 takes are an interesting peek inside movie-making.

    Gerwig and Baumbach are on the show today talking about the movie, that period in one’s twenties where growing pains are still palpable and Woody Allen.

  2. Fresh Air

    Interviews

    New York Times

    Greta Gerwig

    Noah Baumbach

    Frances Ha