1. Judith Shulevitz on how she reconciles her faith in science with her religious faith:



What we’re discovering is that we’re enormously malleable. We’re really responsive to our environment in a physical sense, but also in a psychological sense, in the sense that stress is one of the really big forces in epigenetic changes. So the malleability of the human body seems to me an argument for creating a better community, a better society, and that’s what I love about religion: is that it’s a place where you can turn for ideas about the good society. I recognize — as many people go around arguing — that religion can be used as a force for bad — but it can also be used as a source of ideas that drive us to the greater good. So I turn to science to tell us how to live and I turn to religion to tell us how to live and I follow neither of them slavishly.




Image by Electric Arc via Flickr Commons

    Judith Shulevitz on how she reconciles her faith in science with her religious faith:

    What we’re discovering is that we’re enormously malleable. We’re really responsive to our environment in a physical sense, but also in a psychological sense, in the sense that stress is one of the really big forces in epigenetic changes. So the malleability of the human body seems to me an argument for creating a better community, a better society, and that’s what I love about religion: is that it’s a place where you can turn for ideas about the good society. I recognize — as many people go around arguing — that religion can be used as a force for bad — but it can also be used as a source of ideas that drive us to the greater good. So I turn to science to tell us how to live and I turn to religion to tell us how to live and I follow neither of them slavishly.

    Image by Electric Arc via Flickr Commons

  2. Judith Shulevitz

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  1. Judith Shulevitz talks to Terry Gross about the dilemma she faced as a woman who wanted to become both a respected journalist and a mother:





There’s kind of either-or here. There’s an either you become a respected journalist by working your head off, or you go and start a family, and what I’m saying is we have to start thinking about combining those two, because I found myself in a situation where I worried that my advanced maternal age was endangering my children and even threatening my chances of having any, which is what drove me to the fertility doctor. … If [having children younger] had been something other people were doing, I might have started to think about it and if it had been something that my bosses would have thought was fine, then I might have started to think about it. I mean my bosses — who are part of the same system — would have looked askance. They would have said, ‘Well, she’s not serious.’






Image by beckslrdt via Flickr

    Judith Shulevitz talks to Terry Gross about the dilemma she faced as a woman who wanted to become both a respected journalist and a mother:

    There’s kind of either-or here. There’s an either you become a respected journalist by working your head off, or you go and start a family, and what I’m saying is we have to start thinking about combining those two, because I found myself in a situation where I worried that my advanced maternal age was endangering my children and even threatening my chances of having any, which is what drove me to the fertility doctor. … If [having children younger] had been something other people were doing, I might have started to think about it and if it had been something that my bosses would have thought was fine, then I might have started to think about it. I mean my bosses — who are part of the same system — would have looked askance. They would have said, ‘Well, she’s not serious.’

    Image by beckslrdt via Flickr

  2. Fresh Air

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    The New Republic

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