1. Charlie LeDuff tells Dave Davies about his two rules for journalism:

There’s two rules to this whole game called journalism: Get it right; and don’t be boring. Because if you’re boring, you’re dead. I’ll say it this way: [The] press is written into the Constitution like the judiciary, the executive and the legislative, except they didn’t leave us any money. We have to find our own money to do it. So if people don’t want to purchase your product, you’re dead. So I like Borat; I like Jackass; I like Charles Kuralt; I like Colbert; I like 60 Minutes. I like kitty cats and YouTube. Put them all together, shake it up, and give me something — give me something smart and give me something entertaining. That’s my mantra.
View in High-Res

    Charlie LeDuff tells Dave Davies about his two rules for journalism:

    There’s two rules to this whole game called journalism: Get it right; and don’t be boring. Because if you’re boring, you’re dead. I’ll say it this way: [The] press is written into the Constitution like the judiciary, the executive and the legislative, except they didn’t leave us any money. We have to find our own money to do it. So if people don’t want to purchase your product, you’re dead. So I like Borat; I like Jackass; I like Charles Kuralt; I like Colbert; I like 60 Minutes. I like kitty cats and YouTube. Put them all together, shake it up, and give me something — give me something smart and give me something entertaining. That’s my mantra.

  2. Fresh Air

    Interviews

    Charlie LeDuff

    Detroit: An Autopsy

    journalism

  1. Charlie LeDuff, author of Detroit: An American Autopsy, tells Dave Davies about returning to his hometown of Detroit and finding it a very different city from the one he had left 20 years earlier:

It was empty. It wasn’t scary. It was sort of like, in many respects, living at Chernobyl in some neighborhoods. … I looked and I thought to myself one day, ‘What happened here? What happened?’ And so this is not a book about ruin porn or empty buildings. This book is dedicated to those of us who live here in the industrial Midwest, specifically Detroit and its inner-ring suburbs. We’re still trying to reconstruct the great thing we once had.

Image of Detroit circa 1917, “Looking Up Woodward Avenue” via Shorpy View in High-Res

    Charlie LeDuff, author of Detroit: An American Autopsy, tells Dave Davies about returning to his hometown of Detroit and finding it a very different city from the one he had left 20 years earlier:

    It was empty. It wasn’t scary. It was sort of like, in many respects, living at Chernobyl in some neighborhoods. … I looked and I thought to myself one day, ‘What happened here? What happened?’ And so this is not a book about ruin porn or empty buildings. This book is dedicated to those of us who live here in the industrial Midwest, specifically Detroit and its inner-ring suburbs. We’re still trying to reconstruct the great thing we once had.

    Image of Detroit circa 1917, “Looking Up Woodward Avenue” via Shorpy

  2. Fresh Air

    Interviews

    Charlie LeDuff

    Detroit: An Autopsy

  1. Coming up on Monday, we’ve got Pulitzer-Prize winning reporter Charlie LeDuff, a former New York Times journalist and author of the new book Detroit: An Autopsy. Charlie left the Times about six years ago to move back and report on his hometown of Detroit. These days he’s a television reporter for WJBK-TV in the city. Above, a report he did called “Charlie LeDuff Investigates Poop Contracts” on, well, poop contracts.

  2. Fresh Air

    Charlie LeDuff

    Detroit: An Autopsy

    coming up next week

    poop contracts