1. The book that the late David Rakoff completed just before he passed away last August, Love, Dishonor, Marry, Die, Cherish, Perish, will be published on July 16. It sounds wonderful.
Ira Glass to The New York Times:

Its dirty little secret is that David was probably a better novelist than he was an essayist. I mean, he was a great essayist, famous and all that, but that came so hard to him, and I think writing this, writing drama, gave him so much more pleasure.

An interview with Rakoff here. And a remembrance here. View in High-Res

    The book that the late David Rakoff completed just before he passed away last August, Love, Dishonor, Marry, Die, Cherish, Perish, will be published on July 16. It sounds wonderful.

    Ira Glass to The New York Times:

    Its dirty little secret is that David was probably a better novelist than he was an essayist. I mean, he was a great essayist, famous and all that, but that came so hard to him, and I think writing this, writing drama, gave him so much more pleasure.

    An interview with Rakoff here. And a remembrance here.

  2. David Rakoff

    Ira Glass

    Fresh Air

    This American Life

    The New York Times

    Love Dishonor Marry Die Cherish Perish

  1. I had a beautiful childhood and a lovely childhood. I just didn’t like being a child. I didn’t like the rank injustice of not being listened to. I didn’t like the lack of autonomy. I didn’t like my chubby little hands that couldn’t manipulate the world of objects in the way that I wanted them to. Being a child, for me, was an exercise in impotent powerlessness. I was never terribly good at that kind of no-holds-barred fun. … I’ve essentially made a career on not being good at no-holds-barred fun.
    But, you know, I [was] just never sort of like, hey, yes, let’s go play. I was always more sort of like, does everybody know where the fire exit is? And let’s make sure there’s enough oxygen in this elevator. … As a grownup it’s much easier to work — to navigate the world with that, because then you can just go home to your own apartment.

    — David Rakoff on his childhood

  2. David Rakoff

  1. Posted on 10 August, 2012

    102 notes | Permalink

    Reblogged from rorevans

    David Rakoff made this duct-tape wallet for a fan. 
rorevans:

Duct-tape wallet made for Alison Maclean, member of the David Rakoff fan club.
View in High-Res

    David Rakoff made this duct-tape wallet for a fan.

    rorevans:

    Duct-tape wallet made for Alison Maclean, member of the David Rakoff fan club.

  2. David Rakoff

    submission

  1. Congrats to David Rakoff who just won this year’s Thurber Prize for American Humor!
Rakoff on Fresh Air and Morning Edition and This American Life. View in High-Res

    Congrats to David Rakoff who just won this year’s Thurber Prize for American Humor!

    Rakoff on Fresh Air and Morning Edition and This American Life.

  2. thurber prize

    humor

    david rakoff

  1. Seeing so many friends who were truly young and friends of friends — you know, I’m a gay guy, living in New York City during the ’80s and ’90s during the height of the pandemic — it was like living in wartime but a very specific kind of war … it [affected] a very limited sector of the population and there were other people beside you everywhere who were not fighting it, who were not even conscious of it. It was very strange to feel so in the trenches and to be going from hospital to hospital — more than one a day sometimes — to visit people who were dying. It did cross my mind that my fervent will to live — and it is fervent, and it is still in operation, and it is still, in fact, the area of my life of which I’m most optimistic, and I think that people really do tend to be hugely optimistic about their own chances of survival going from day to day — but it did cross my mind and it remains in my mind that all of the people that I know who did die, they didn’t die because they want to live less than I do. They didn’t die because their desire to continue existing was found wanting in ways that my own is somehow better. And that is tremendously instructive to me.

    — David Rakoff in an interview on Fresh Air with Terry Gross, on seeing his young friends die from AIDS in the 1980s.

  2. david rakoff

    aids

    fresh air

    terry gross

    npr

  1. David Rakoff on why he doesn’t pray after receiving his cancer diagnosis: “Writer Melissa Bank  said it best: ‘The only proper answer to ‘Why me?’ is ‘Why not you?’ The  universe is anarchic and doesn’t care about us and unfortunately,  there’s no greater rhyme or reason as to why it would be me. And since  there is no answer as to why me, it’s not a question I feel really  entitled to ask. And in so many other ways, I’m so far ahead of the  game. I have access to great medical care. My general baseline health,  aside from the general unpleasantness of the cancer, is great. And it’s  great because I’m privileged to have great health. And I live in a  country where I’m not making sneakers for a living and I don’t live near  a toxic waste dump. You can’t win all the contests and then lose at one  contest and say ‘Why am I not winning this contest as well?’ It’s  random. So truthfully, again, do I wish it weren’t me? Absolutely. I  still can’t make that logistic jump to thinking there’s a reason why it  shouldn’t be me.” View in High-Res

    David Rakoff on why he doesn’t pray after receiving his cancer diagnosis: “Writer Melissa Bank said it best: ‘The only proper answer to ‘Why me?’ is ‘Why not you?’ The universe is anarchic and doesn’t care about us and unfortunately, there’s no greater rhyme or reason as to why it would be me. And since there is no answer as to why me, it’s not a question I feel really entitled to ask. And in so many other ways, I’m so far ahead of the game. I have access to great medical care. My general baseline health, aside from the general unpleasantness of the cancer, is great. And it’s great because I’m privileged to have great health. And I live in a country where I’m not making sneakers for a living and I don’t live near a toxic waste dump. You can’t win all the contests and then lose at one contest and say ‘Why am I not winning this contest as well?’ It’s random. So truthfully, again, do I wish it weren’t me? Absolutely. I still can’t make that logistic jump to thinking there’s a reason why it shouldn’t be me.”

  2. david rakoff

    half empty

    fresh air

    npr

    terry gross

  1. Today’s Guest: David Rakoff

    irismurdoch:

    On today’s Selected Shorts, office politics. David Rakoff reads “Alvin the Typesetter,” by Lydia Davis, and Steven Colbert reads “The Lie,” by T.C. Boyle. 

    A good listen.

  2. david rakoff

    stephen colbert

    wnyc

    selected shorts

  1. Our guest tomorrow, David Rakoff, is a frequent contributor on This American Life. He’ll read from and talk about his new collection of essays, Half Empty. It starts with the power of negative thinking and ends with a recurrence of cancer.

  2. david rakoff

    fresh air

    npr

    terry gross