1. Arrested Development creator Mitch Hurwitz is on the show today and let’s be honest: We’re excited!

    Arrested Development creator Mitch Hurwitz is on the show today and let’s be honest: We’re excited!

  2. Lucille Bluth

    Arrested Development

    Fresh Air

    Interviews

    Mitch Hurwitz

    Coming up

  1. Q: I wouldn’t want to be friends with Nora, would you? Her outlook is almost unbearably grim.

    A: For heaven’s sake, what kind of question is that? Would you want to be friends with Humbert Humbert? Would you want to be friends with Mickey Sabbath? Saleem Sinai? Hamlet? Krapp? Oedipus? Oscar Wao? Antigone? Raskolnikov? Any of the characters in The Corrections? Any of the characters in Infinite Jest? Any of the characters in anything Pynchon has ever written? Or Martin Amis? Or Orhan Pamuk? Or Alice Munro, for that matter? If you’re reading to find friends, you’re in deep trouble. We read to find life, in all its possibilities. The relevant question isn’t “is this a potential friend for me?” but “is this character alive?”

     

    (Claire Messud gave Publishers Weekly the answer it deserved last week. She’s on the show tomorrow. Tune in to see what answers she gives Terry!)

  2. Fresh Air

    Interview

    Claire Messud

    The Woman Upstairs

    Publishers Weekly

    Coming Up

    Sass

  1. That sense of victory barely lasted the morning. The same financial behemoths that had fought so ferociously to block Dodd-Frank were not going to let the mere fact of the bill’s passage ruin their plans. “Halftime,” shrugged Scott Talbott, chief lobbyist for the Financial Services Roundtable, a lobbying group representing 100 of the country’s largest financial institutions.

    — Gary Rivlin, "How Wall Street Defanged Dodd-Frank", in the May 20, 2013 issue of The Nation. Rivlin will be on the show tomorrow talking about the article.

  2. Fresh Air

    Gary Rivlin

    The Nation

    Coming Up

    Wall Street

    Dodd-Frank

  1. Tomorrow on the show, Terry is talking to journalist C.J. Chivers about reporting he has been doing on Syria for The New York Times. Chivers is also the author of The Gun, that traces how the AK-47 spread around the world. Terry spoke with Chivers in 2010, when that book came out:

On why child soldiers favor AK-47s:
"It’s out there. And the weapon that’s out there is the weapon that tends to get used. But the other reason is the design. It’s very, very simple. It’s almost intuitive. You can take it apart very quickly and put it back together just as quickly. It’s simple to clean. It’s simple to maintain. Most of the Kalashnikovs out there are very well made for the actual conditions of war. It has an excellent protective finish. It’s chromed on the inside of its barrel and its chamber. All of these things mean that if you’re not particularly attentive in caring for it, it’s still going to last and it’s still going to work."
View in High-Res

    Tomorrow on the show, Terry is talking to journalist C.J. Chivers about reporting he has been doing on Syria for The New York Times. Chivers is also the author of The Gunthat traces how the AK-47 spread around the world. Terry spoke with Chivers in 2010, when that book came out:

    On why child soldiers favor AK-47s:

    "It’s out there. And the weapon that’s out there is the weapon that tends to get used. But the other reason is the design. It’s very, very simple. It’s almost intuitive. You can take it apart very quickly and put it back together just as quickly. It’s simple to clean. It’s simple to maintain. Most of the Kalashnikovs out there are very well made for the actual conditions of war. It has an excellent protective finish. It’s chromed on the inside of its barrel and its chamber. All of these things mean that if you’re not particularly attentive in caring for it, it’s still going to last and it’s still going to work."

  2. ak+47

    Fresh Air

    Interviews

    C.J. Chivers

    New York Times

    Syria

    The Gun

    AK-47

    Coming Up

  1. Matthew McConaughey is on the show tomorrow. As The Atlantic pointed out last summer, with Bernie, Magic Mike and Killer Joe on his 2012 resume, the actor had a pretty good run there and in roles that flew in the face of the rom-com stuff he’s become most associated with in the past decade:

Since breaking through in 1993’s Dazed and Confused as hang-about high-school graduate David Wooderson, McConaughey has largely plied his easy charm in rom-coms of no particular distinction. But the new film, directed by William Friedkin from Tracy Letts’s adaptation of his own play (the two previously worked together on 2006’s Bug), caps a banner year for the actor, now indulging in a little character-actor free jazz at 42. He’s reviving comparisons to the late, great Paul Newman—not many of those have come his way since his big-screen breakout nearly two decades ago.

That run of good roles continues with his latest in Jeff Nichols’s Mud. In fact, this role might cement his new real-life role as Matthew McConaughey: Serious Actor with Serious Cred. View in High-Res

    Matthew McConaughey is on the show tomorrow. As The Atlantic pointed out last summer, with Bernie, Magic Mike and Killer Joe on his 2012 resume, the actor had a pretty good run there and in roles that flew in the face of the rom-com stuff he’s become most associated with in the past decade:

    Since breaking through in 1993’s Dazed and Confused as hang-about high-school graduate David Wooderson, McConaughey has largely plied his easy charm in rom-coms of no particular distinction. But the new film, directed by William Friedkin from Tracy Letts’s adaptation of his own play (the two previously worked together on 2006’s Bug), caps a banner year for the actor, now indulging in a little character-actor free jazz at 42. He’s reviving comparisons to the late, great Paul Newman—not many of those have come his way since his big-screen breakout nearly two decades ago.

    That run of good roles continues with his latest in Jeff Nichols’s Mud. In fact, this role might cement his new real-life role as Matthew McConaughey: Serious Actor with Serious Cred.

  2. matthew+mcconaughey

    Fresh Air

    Coming Up

    The Atlantic

    Mud

  1. But I do love this city. I love its atrocious accent, its inferiority complex in terms of New York, its nut-job drivers, the insane logic of its street system. I get a perverse pleasure every time I take the T in the winter and the air-conditioning is on in the subway car, or when I take it in the summer and the heat is blasting. Bostonians don’t love easy things, they love hard things — blizzards, the bleachers in Fenway Park, a good brawl over a contested parking space. Two different friends texted me the identical message yesterday: They messed with the wrong city.

    — "Messing with the Wrong City" by Dennis Lehane in The New York Times. We will be talking with Lehane, among others about the events unfolding in Boston on the show today.

  2. Fresh Air

    Interviews

    Coming Up

    Dennis Lehane

    Boston

    The New York Times

    Messing with the Wrong City

  1. [T]he Southern Baptist Convention, America’s largest Christian denomination save the Catholic Church, passed a resolution calling on its 16 million members to get involved, whether that meant taking in children themselves, donating to adoptive families, or supporting the hundreds of adoption ministries that were springing up around the country to raise money and spread the word. Neo-Pentecostal leader Lou Engle also called for mega-churches to take on the cause, which would give them “moral authority in this nation.”


    The movement spawned numerous conferences and books built around the idea that adopting a needy child is a form of missionary work. “The ultimate purpose of human adoption by Christians,” author Dan Cruver wrote in his 2011 book, Reclaiming Adoption, “is not to give orphans parents, as important as that is. It is to place them in a Christian home that they might be positioned to receive the gospel.” At an adoption summit hosted by the Christian Alliance for Orphans at Southern California’s Saddleback Church, pastor Rick Warren told followers, “What God does to us spiritually, he expects us to do to orphans physically: be born again and adopted.”

    — from "Orphan Fever" by Kathryn Joyce in the May/June 2013 issue of Mother Jones. Joyce will be on the show today talking about the outsized role of evangelical Christians on the adoption industry. Her new book is The Child Catchers: Rescue, Trafficking and the New Gospel of Adoption.

  2. Kathryn Joyce

    adoption

    Mother Jones

    Fresh Air

    Coming Up

    Orphan Fever

  1. More than two years later, the Raymond Davis episode has been largely forgotten in the United States. It was immediately overshadowed by the dramatic raid months later that killed Osama bin Laden — consigned to a footnote in the doleful narrative of America’s relationship with Pakistan. But dozens of interviews conducted over several months, with government officials and intelligence officers in Pakistan and in the United States, tell a different story: that the real unraveling of the relationship was set off by the flurry of bullets Davis unleashed on the afternoon of Jan. 27, 2011, and exacerbated by a series of misguided decisions in the days and weeks that followed. In Pakistan, it is the Davis affair, more than the Bin Laden raid, that is still discussed in the country’s crowded bazaars and corridors of power.

    — "How A Single Spy Helped Turn Pakistan Against the United States." Today’s guest Mark Mazzetti writing in The New York Times Magazine.

  2. Fresh Air

    Interviews

    Coming up

    Mark Mazzetti

    New York Times

  1. Singer, composer, musician Jherek Bischoff is on the show tomorrow. Watch him bring it with the ukelele in the video from KEXP above. It’s pretty awesome stuff.

  2. Fresh Air

    Interviews

    Coming Up

    Jherek Bischoff

    KEXP

  1. So Philip Roth (the man, the legend, the controversial character) turns 80 tomorrow. What are your thoughts on his stature in contemporary American letters, eh?
Critic John Powers will wish Mr. Roth a very happy birthday on the show tomorrow by reviewing the upcoming PBS American Masters, Philip Roth Unmasked. In the meantime…

"Philip Roth On Writing, Aging And ‘Nemesis’ 
Philip Roth Discusses ‘Everyman’
(via Literary Caucus: Salman Rushdie, James Franco, and 28 More Notables Assess Philip Roth’s Career) View in High-Res

    So Philip Roth (the man, the legend, the controversial character) turns 80 tomorrow. What are your thoughts on his stature in contemporary American letters, eh?

    Critic John Powers will wish Mr. Roth a very happy birthday on the show tomorrow by reviewing the upcoming PBS American Masters, Philip Roth Unmasked. In the meantime…

    (via Literary Caucus: Salman Rushdie, James Franco, and 28 More Notables Assess Philip Roth’s Career)

  2. Fresh Air

    Reviews

    Interviews

    Philip Roth

    Vulture

    John Powers

    Coming Up

    Books

    Notable Birthdays

  1. On Monday’s show, Terry is talking with Emily Rapp about Rapp’s new memoir, The Still Point of the Turning World, about Rapp’s son Ronan, who was diagnosed with the degenerative and always-fatal Tay-Sachs disease when he was nine months old. I listened to the interview this morning and it’s wonderful. I am also a fan of Rapp’s writing and so, for your weekend reading, here’s one of my favorite pieces by her — an essay called "Transformation and Transcendence: The Power of Female Friendship" (published on The Rumpus in January 2012). She writes about three older women she met while working overseas in her early twenties, what they taught her about friendship, and how she understood that kind of love with a renewed appreciation in the wake of Ronan’s diagnosis. I just reread the essay for the umpteenth time and can feel the spots on my cheek where the tears have dried again:

I drank with them, silently, as the rain pounded the darkened windows. What I realized, sitting there, was that these women had been in these kinds of emotionally challenging situations for over 20 years. Together. They understood, together, as friends, and apart, as individuals in the world, the urgency of compassion, and that it often goes unnoticed but that this doesn’t make it any less important or vital or difficult to sustain and cultivate. And they also understood that you could try as hard as you possibly could, and disaster could still strike – mercilessly. Without warning, without fairness, and with fatal consequences.

Image by Thomas/Flickr

    On Monday’s show, Terry is talking with Emily Rapp about Rapp’s new memoir, The Still Point of the Turning World, about Rapp’s son Ronan, who was diagnosed with the degenerative and always-fatal Tay-Sachs disease when he was nine months old. I listened to the interview this morning and it’s wonderful. I am also a fan of Rapp’s writing and so, for your weekend reading, here’s one of my favorite pieces by her — an essay called "Transformation and Transcendence: The Power of Female Friendship" (published on The Rumpus in January 2012). She writes about three older women she met while working overseas in her early twenties, what they taught her about friendship, and how she understood that kind of love with a renewed appreciation in the wake of Ronan’s diagnosis. I just reread the essay for the umpteenth time and can feel the spots on my cheek where the tears have dried again:

    I drank with them, silently, as the rain pounded the darkened windows. What I realized, sitting there, was that these women had been in these kinds of emotionally challenging situations for over 20 years. Together. They understood, together, as friends, and apart, as individuals in the world, the urgency of compassion, and that it often goes unnoticed but that this doesn’t make it any less important or vital or difficult to sustain and cultivate. And they also understood that you could try as hard as you possibly could, and disaster could still strike – mercilessly. Without warning, without fairness, and with fatal consequences.

    Image by Thomas/Flickr

  2. Emily Rapp

    The Rumpus

    Transformation and Transcendence: The Power of Femal Friendship

    Fresh Air

    Coming Up

    Tay-Sachs Disease

    Weekend Reading

  1. I left most of the debris in the desert, save for the medications, pictures and letters from M. I also took the plastic grocery bags, which I untangled from the bushes and recycled on my way through Reno. It didn’t feel right to just leave them out there.

    — From "The Last Thing We Need" by Claire Vaye Watkins in Granta. The story is included in Watkins’s collection Battleborn, which won The Story Prize last night. Because of this news (congrats to Watkins!), there’s been a slight change of plan. Instead of our interview with environmental reporter Justin Gillis as we said yesterday, we’ll talk today with Watkins about growing up in the Nevada desert, her father’s history as part of the Manson Family, and her attachment to the American West.

  2. Claire Vaye Watkins

    Battleborn

    Granta

    Fresh Air

    Coming Up

    The Last Thing We Need

  1. In February, we aired an interview with Jake Tapper about his new book, The Outpost: An Untold Story of American Valor. When Terry spoke with him, so much good stuff came of it that we decided to make it into two interviews. We’re airing the second part today on the show. It will focus on his switch from ABC News to hosting his own show on CNN, and he’ll talk in part about asking Obama a tough question about the President’s record on gun legislation in the wake of Newtown and the White House’s response.

    coeurdesfeuilles:

    Jake Tapper, ABC News’ senior White House correspondent, tweeted out the names and ages of those who were killed at the elementary school in Newtown, Conn.

  2. Fresh Air

    Interviews

    Jake Tapper

    Coming Up

    Guns

    Newtown

  1. At the heart of Pakistan’s troubles is the celebration of the militant. Whether fighting in Afghanistan, or Kashmir, or at home, this deadly figure has been elevated to heroic status: willing to make the ultimate sacrifice, able to win the ultimate victory, selfless, noble. Yet as tens of thousands of Pakistanis die at the hands of such heroes, as tens of millions of Pakistanis go about their lives in daily fear of them, a recalibration is being demanded. The need of the hour, of the year, of the generation, is peace.

    — From a February 21 op-ed in The New York Times, "To Fight India, We Fought Ourselves" by today’s guest Mohsin Hamid. Hamid’s new book is called How To Get Filthy Rich In Rising Asia.

  2. Mohsin Hamid

    How To Get Filthy Rich In Rising Asia

    Pakistan

    Fresh Air

    Interviews

    Coming Up

    The New York Times

  1. Record collecting advice from hiphop producer/composer Adrian Younge courtesy of Crate Diggers:

    If you see an organ on an album and the guy’s not old, buy the album.

    Remember that.

    Younge is on the show tomorrow talking about his project with William Hart, “Adrian Younge Presents the Delfonics”, and his collaboration with Ghostface Killah that comes out in April.

  2. Adrian Younge

    Fresh Air

    Coming Up

    Crate Diggers

    Organ-related wisdom