1. Historian Bruce Levine explores the destruction of the old South and the reunified country that emerged from the Civil War in his new book, The Fall of the House of Dixie. He says one result of the Emancipation Proclamation was a flood of black men from the South into the Union Army:

"By the end of the Civil War, nearly 200,000 black men had served in either the Union army or the Union navy, and that alone was an enormous military assistance to the Union at a time when volunteering had fallen drastically and when there was a great deal of hostility to the draft. So these 200,000 men significantly contributed to giving the Union army the volume, the bulk, the size that they needed to cope with their Confederate opponents, and that gave the union the power, ultimately, to overwhelm the opposition."

photo via slideshare View in High-Res

    Historian Bruce Levine explores the destruction of the old South and the reunified country that emerged from the Civil War in his new book, The Fall of the House of Dixie. He says one result of the Emancipation Proclamation was a flood of black men from the South into the Union Army:

    "By the end of the Civil War, nearly 200,000 black men had served in either the Union army or the Union navy, and that alone was an enormous military assistance to the Union at a time when volunteering had fallen drastically and when there was a great deal of hostility to the draft. So these 200,000 men significantly contributed to giving the Union army the volume, the bulk, the size that they needed to cope with their Confederate opponents, and that gave the union the power, ultimately, to overwhelm the opposition."

    photo via slideshare

  2. civil war

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  1. Today is the 150th anniversary of the beginning of Battle of Gettysburg, the turning point of the Civil War and one of the bloodiest fights ever fought on American soil.
To mark the occasion, an interview with Civil War historians Drew Gilpin Faust and Adam Goodheart.
Image of the Gettysburg Cyclorama via The Washington Post

    Today is the 150th anniversary of the beginning of Battle of Gettysburg, the turning point of the Civil War and one of the bloodiest fights ever fought on American soil.

    To mark the occasion, an interview with Civil War historians Drew Gilpin Faust and Adam Goodheart.

    Image of the Gettysburg Cyclorama via The Washington Post

  2. Fresh Air

    Interviews

    Drew Gilpink Faust

    Gettysburg

    Adam Goodheart

    Civil War

    Cyclorama

  1. When you go back and you look at the actual documents, many people have said since then that it was about states’ rights, but really the only significant state right that people were arguing about in 1860 was the right to own what was known as slave property — property and slaves unimpeded — and to be able to travel with that property anywhere that you wanted to. So it’s clear that this was really about slavery in almost every significant way, but we’ve sort of pushed that to the side because of course we want to believe that our country is a country that’s always stood for freedom. And … certainly it’s difficult for some Southern Americans to accept that their ancestors fought a war on behalf of slavery. And I think that Northerners really, for the cause of national reconciliation, decided to push that aside — decided to accept Southerners’ denials or demurrals.

    — Adam Goodheart on why people still argue over the cause of the Civil War. The war began 152 years ago today, on April 12, 1861.

  2. Fresh Air

    Interviews

    Adam Goodheart

    Civil War

    Anniversaries

  1. Tony Kushner talks to Terry Gross about the 16th president and writing the screenplay for Steven Spielberg’s Oscar-nominated film, ‘Lincoln’:

    I think that what Lincoln was doing at the end of war was a very, very smart thing. And it is maybe one of the great tragedies of American history that people didn’t take him literally after he was murdered. The inability to forgive and to reconcile with the South in a really decent and humane way, without any question, was one of the causes of the kind of resentment and perpetuation of alienation and bitterness that led to the quote-unquote ‘noble cause,’ and the rise of the Klan and Southern self-protection societies.

    The abuse of the South after they were defeated was a catastrophe, and helped lead to just unimaginable, untellable human suffering. So had Lincoln not been murdered, and had he really been able to guide Reconstruction, I think there’s a good reason to believe that he would have acted on those principles, because he meant them. We know that he meant them literally, because he told [Ulysses S.] Grant to behave accordingly.

  2. Fresh Air

    Interviews

    Tony Kushner

    Lincoln

    Steven Spielberg

    Civil War

  1. Since we’re talking about the Civil War on the show today, I thought I’d take the opportunity to point you in the direction of one of my favorite short essays in recent memory. A few years back, Ta-Nehisi Coates of The Atlantic took a trip to Virginia with his family to visit Civil War battlefields. His blog posts about that trip are remarkable. Especially the final one. It grabs you from the first sentence: “By Saturday, Virginia was overwhelming.” A Virginian myself, I find myself rereading the piece with some regularity, and I’m always amazed at the emotional immediacy and resonance Coates brings to his writing about the Civil War.:











I love the lore of the Wilderness. Early in the fight the Union had pushed the Confederates all the way back to Lee’s headquarters. Lee stood up, about to lead the counter-charge himself, until a division of Texans held him down, “Go back General Lee!” they yelled. I think that is so beautiful, the complete disregard for logic, and personal safety. Still I see it through a cracked glass. It’s like reading a lush love story about a man and a woman, who do not like you.











Read all his Virginia posts here and here and here and here.
Above is a photograph from one of my favorite photographers (and fellow Virginian) Sally Mann. In 2004, as part of her "What Remains" project, Mann took photographs of the battlefield of "Antietam". 23,000 men were dead, wounded or missing at the end of the day on September 17, 1861 near Sharpsburg, Maryland, making it the single bloodiest day in American history. Mann’s photographs are haunting and evocative of that horror. To heighten the connection between past and present, Mann printed the photographs using the 19th-century methods used by Civil War photographer Mathew Brady, among others.
- Nell View in High-Res

    Since we’re talking about the Civil War on the show today, I thought I’d take the opportunity to point you in the direction of one of my favorite short essays in recent memory. A few years back, Ta-Nehisi Coates of The Atlantic took a trip to Virginia with his family to visit Civil War battlefields. His blog posts about that trip are remarkable. Especially the final one. It grabs you from the first sentence: “By Saturday, Virginia was overwhelming.” A Virginian myself, I find myself rereading the piece with some regularity, and I’m always amazed at the emotional immediacy and resonance Coates brings to his writing about the Civil War.:

    I love the lore of the Wilderness. Early in the fight the Union had pushed the Confederates all the way back to Lee’s headquarters. Lee stood up, about to lead the counter-charge himself, until a division of Texans held him down, “Go back General Lee!” they yelled. I think that is so beautiful, the complete disregard for logic, and personal safety. Still I see it through a cracked glass. It’s like reading a lush love story about a man and a woman, who do not like you.

    Read all his Virginia posts here and here and here and here.

    Above is a photograph from one of my favorite photographers (and fellow Virginian) Sally Mann. In 2004, as part of her "What Remains" project, Mann took photographs of the battlefield of "Antietam". 23,000 men were dead, wounded or missing at the end of the day on September 17, 1861 near Sharpsburg, Maryland, making it the single bloodiest day in American history. Mann’s photographs are haunting and evocative of that horror. To heighten the connection between past and present, Mann printed the photographs using the 19th-century methods used by Civil War photographer Mathew Brady, among others.

    - Nell

  2. Civil War

    Sally Mann

    Antietam

    Ta-Nehisi Coates

  1. Our interview today is with historian Bruce Levine about his book, The Fall of the House of Dixie, so to keep with the Civil War theme we’ve got going, here’s a cool photo of a reenactor visiting the Atlanta Cyclorama by Jon-Phillip Sheridan, View in High-Res

    Our interview today is with historian Bruce Levine about his book, The Fall of the House of Dixie, so to keep with the Civil War theme we’ve got going, here’s a cool photo of a reenactor visiting the Atlanta Cyclorama by Jon-Phillip Sheridan,

  2. Bruce Levine

    Civil War

    Fresh Air

    Interviews

    Jon-Phillip Sheridan

    photography

  1. General George McClellan really does see himself as the indispensable man. His resentments of Lincoln are phenomenal.  He refers to him as ‘the original gorilla,’ ‘a well-meaning baboon,’ a traitor or the tool of traitors.


    — Richard Slotkin on General George 
    McClellan and what he thought of his commander-in-chief, President Abraham Lincoln

  2. Richard Slotkin

    Civil War

  1. "In 1913, there was an anniversary celebration at Gettysburg — the anniversary of the 1863 battle — and they brought these Northern and Southern veterans together, and the Confederate and Union vets embraced one another. There are some wonderful photographs, and they’re holding Union flags and Confederate flags, and Woodrow Wilson went and gave a speech, saying that the ‘old quarrel has been forgotten.’ Well, it’s very symbolically significant that excluded from that reunion were the black veterans. They were not even invited to participate. That part of the Civil War history was, for a long time in this country, simply pushed aside and erased almost completely.” — Adam Goodheart View in High-Res

    "In 1913, there was an anniversary celebration at Gettysburg — the anniversary of the 1863 battle — and they brought these Northern and Southern veterans together, and the Confederate and Union vets embraced one another. There are some wonderful photographs, and they’re holding Union flags and Confederate flags, and Woodrow Wilson went and gave a speech, saying that the ‘old quarrel has been forgotten.’ Well, it’s very symbolically significant that excluded from that reunion were the black veterans. They were not even invited to participate. That part of the Civil War history was, for a long time in this country, simply pushed aside and erased almost completely.” — Adam Goodheart

  2. 1861

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  1. todaysdocument:

On February 16, 1862, Union forces under general Ulysses S. Grant Captured Fort Donelson in Tennessee.  It was one of the first major Union victories of the Civil War and earned Grant the nickname “Unconditional Surrender” Grant.

Sketch [map] of Fort Donelson and Out Works… by Lt. W. L. B. Jenney, V. Engrs., [and] Lt. W. Kossack…, 02/28/1862


Tomorrow: historian Adam Goodheart talks about his social history of the Civil War, 1861. View in High-Res

    todaysdocument:

    On February 16, 1862, Union forces under general Ulysses S. Grant Captured Fort Donelson in Tennessee.  It was one of the first major Union victories of the Civil War and earned Grant the nickname “Unconditional Surrender” Grant.

    Sketch [map] of Fort Donelson and Out Works… by Lt. W. L. B. Jenney, V. Engrs., [and] Lt. W. Kossack…, 02/28/1862

    Tomorrow: historian Adam Goodheart talks about his social history of the Civil War, 1861.

  2. Adam Goodheart

    1861

    civil war

  1. Posted on 12 April, 2011

    104 notes | Permalink

    Reblogged from usagov

    usagov:


Commercial lithographer Henry S. Graham printed this choropleth map showing the distribution of the slave population in September 1861. The map shows in graphic terms the density of the slave population in the Southern states, based on figures from the 1860 census. Although the development of this map was a collaborative government effort, cartographers working for Edwin Hergesheimer, U.S. Coast Survey Drafting Division, created it.

Learn more about this map and other Civil War maps and charts from the United States Office of Coast Survey.
View in High-Res

    usagov:

    Commercial lithographer Henry S. Graham printed this choropleth map showing the distribution of the slave population in September 1861. The map shows in graphic terms the density of the slave population in the Southern states, based on figures from the 1860 census. Although the development of this map was a collaborative government effort, cartographers working for Edwin Hergesheimer, U.S. Coast Survey Drafting Division, created it.

    Learn more about this map and other Civil War maps and charts from the United States Office of Coast Survey.

  2. map

    chart

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  1. [At Fort Sumter] the Southerners thought that they would be able to drive the Yankees off of Confederate territory and [they thought that] the North would feel like it wasn’t worthwhile to fight to bring the South back into the Union. Suffice to say, they miscalculated hugely.

    — Historian Adam Goodheart on the events at Fort Sumter 150 years ago today.

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  1. Historian Adam Goodheart on the Civil War’s 50th anniversary: "In 1913, there was an anniversary celebration at Gettysburg — the anniversary of the 1863 battle — and they brought these Northern and Southern veterans together and the Confederate and Union vets embraced one another. There are some wonderful photographs and they’re holding Union flags and Confederate flags and Woodrow Wilson went and gave a speech, saying that the ‘old quarrel has been forgotten.’ Well it’s very symbolically significant that excluded from that reunion were the black veterans. They were not even invited to participate. That part of the Civil War history was, for a long time in this country, simply pushed aside and erased almost completely.” View in High-Res

    Historian Adam Goodheart on the Civil War’s 50th anniversary"In 1913, there was an anniversary celebration at Gettysburg — the anniversary of the 1863 battle — and they brought these Northern and Southern veterans together and the Confederate and Union vets embraced one another. There are some wonderful photographs and they’re holding Union flags and Confederate flags and Woodrow Wilson went and gave a speech, saying that the ‘old quarrel has been forgotten.’ Well it’s very symbolically significant that excluded from that reunion were the black veterans. They were not even invited to participate. That part of the Civil War history was, for a long time in this country, simply pushed aside and erased almost completely.”

  2. civil war

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    1861

  1. Eric Foner, author of Our Lincoln, talks about the era following the Civil War in which former slaves were promised equal rights and citizenship. Foner is DeWitt Clinton Professor of History at Columbia University.

  2. eric foner

    civil war

    columbia university

  1. mrsdentonorahippo:

1865. “Charleston, South Carolina. Breach patched with gabions on the north wall of Fort Sumter.” From photographs of the Federal Navy, and seaborne expeditions against the Atlantic Coast of the Confederacy, 1863-1865.
View in High-Res

    mrsdentonorahippo:

    1865. “Charleston, South Carolina. Breach patched with gabions on the north wall of Fort Sumter.” From photographs of the Federal Navy, and seaborne expeditions against the Atlantic Coast of the Confederacy, 1863-1865.

  2. fort sumter

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