1. Today Julia Collin Davison and Jack Bishop of America’s Test Kitchen take on the challenges of gluten-free baking. The interview is full of tips and recipes to help you navigate this tricky territory. ATK’s Jack Bishop says:

“People don’t really want to make two batches of cookies, one with wheat flour and one with gluten-free flour…They want to make one batch of whatever it is that’s going to be good enough for everybody and isn’t going to be a question of one person who is satisfied and everyone else is suffering in silence. It needed to be good enough that everyone would be happy.”

You can find recipes and more info about their book, The How Can It Be Gluten Free Cookbook on the interview page: 
'Test Kitchen:' Have Your (Gluten-Free) Cake And Love Eating It Too

(PS: The Fresh Air staff taste tested these chocolate chip cookies and they are amazing)
photo courtesy of America’s Test Kitchen View in High-Res

    Today Julia Collin Davison and Jack Bishop of America’s Test Kitchen take on the challenges of gluten-free baking. The interview is full of tips and recipes to help you navigate this tricky territory. ATK’s Jack Bishop says:

    People don’t really want to make two batches of cookies, one with wheat flour and one with gluten-free flour…They want to make one batch of whatever it is that’s going to be good enough for everybody and isn’t going to be a question of one person who is satisfied and everyone else is suffering in silence. It needed to be good enough that everyone would be happy.”

    You can find recipes and more info about their book, The How Can It Be Gluten Free Cookbook on the interview page:

    'Test Kitchen:' Have Your (Gluten-Free) Cake And Love Eating It Too

    (PS: The Fresh Air staff taste tested these chocolate chip cookies and they are amazing)

    photo courtesy of America’s Test Kitchen

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  1. These cupcakes are gluten-free. Really.
Tomorrow we talk to Jack Bishop and Julia Collin Davison of America’s Test Kitchen about their favorite gluten-free recipes and cooking tips.
Hungry yet?

photo courtesy of America’s Test Kitchen View in High-Res

    These cupcakes are gluten-free. Really.

    Tomorrow we talk to Jack Bishop and Julia Collin Davison of America’s Test Kitchen about their favorite gluten-free recipes and cooking tips.

    Hungry yet?

    photo courtesy of America’s Test Kitchen

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  1. Jack Bishop and Bridget Lancaster of America’s Test Kitchen share their favorite holiday tips and treats, like Bishop’s pecan bars:


Jack Bishop: The base is a pecan shortbread. You make it the food processor, toasted nuts, butter, flour, you press it into a baking pan and you bake it until it’s set, about 20 minutes. And then meanwhile, while it’s in the oven, you make the gooey filling. That’s brown sugar, corn syrup, more toasted nuts that are in bigger pieces, vanilla, and then best of all, a shot of bourbon. And then you pour that mixture over the crust that has already been partially baked… and another 20-25 minutes and you have these beautiful pecan bars.


Read the full recipe HERE. View in High-Res

    Jack Bishop and Bridget Lancaster of America’s Test Kitchen share their favorite holiday tips and treats, like Bishop’s pecan bars:

    Jack Bishop: The base is a pecan shortbread. You make it the food processor, toasted nuts, butter, flour, you press it into a baking pan and you bake it until it’s set, about 20 minutes. And then meanwhile, while it’s in the oven, you make the gooey filling. That’s brown sugar, corn syrup, more toasted nuts that are in bigger pieces, vanilla, and then best of all, a shot of bourbon. And then you pour that mixture over the crust that has already been partially baked… and another 20-25 minutes and you have these beautiful pecan bars.

    Read the full recipe HERE.

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  1. Bridget Lancaster of America’s Test Kitchen shares her turkey tips:

Don’t buy too big of a bird. 12-14 lbs is kind of the limit. Any larger than that and you’re going to have a really big problem cooking it evenly because we always know that the breast meat tends to cook a lot faster than the dark meat and it’s also a problem of mechanics. It’s really hard to get a 20 lb turkey into some of the more modern ovens.
After that it’s really making sure you season the turkey. We like natural turkeys, ones that aren’t pre-brined or injected. So you either want to brine it, soak the turkey in salt water solution or you can rub salt under the skin and that really, along with time helps to season the turkey well. You do want to let either the brine or the salt rub do it’s job.
Salting takes a bit more time… 24 hours is a good period of time to wait and that pulls out the moisture from the meat… but it [goes back in] when the salt goes back into the meat. It slowly seasons it. Breast meat is great when it’s salted because it tends to hang on [to] its moisture a bit more so it gives you a window or an error cushion.


image courtesy of America’s Test Kitchen View in High-Res

    Bridget Lancaster of America’s Test Kitchen shares her turkey tips:

    Don’t buy too big of a bird. 12-14 lbs is kind of the limit. Any larger than that and you’re going to have a really big problem cooking it evenly because we always know that the breast meat tends to cook a lot faster than the dark meat and it’s also a problem of mechanics. It’s really hard to get a 20 lb turkey into some of the more modern ovens.

    After that it’s really making sure you season the turkey. We like natural turkeys, ones that aren’t pre-brined or injected. So you either want to brine it, soak the turkey in salt water solution or you can rub salt under the skin and that really, along with time helps to season the turkey well. You do want to let either the brine or the salt rub do it’s job.

    Salting takes a bit more time… 24 hours is a good period of time to wait and that pulls out the moisture from the meat… but it [goes back in] when the salt goes back into the meat. It slowly seasons it. Breast meat is great when it’s salted because it tends to hang on [to] its moisture a bit more so it gives you a window or an error cushion.

    image courtesy of America’s Test Kitchen

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  1. Tomorrow we’ve got Jack Bishop and Bridget Lancaster of America’s Test Kitchen here to give you cooking tips on turkey, stuffing, potatoes, pies (and more) for Thanksgiving!
We’ll shimmy for that.

    Tomorrow we’ve got Jack Bishop and Bridget Lancaster of America’s Test Kitchen here to give you cooking tips on turkey, stuffing, potatoes, pies (and more) for Thanksgiving!

    We’ll shimmy for that.

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  1. Jack Bishop and Bridget Lancaster of America’s Test Kitchen share with us their recipe for making iced coffee:
Cold-Brew Coffee ConcentrateMakes about 11/2 cups; enough for 3 cups iced coffeeStart today, enjoy tomorrow    9    ounces medium-roast coffee beans, ground coarse (31/2 cups)    31/2    cups filtered water, room temperature        Kosher salt (optional)1. Stir coffee and water together in large (about 2‑quart) glass French press. Allow raft of ground coffee to form, about 10 minutes, then stir again to recombine. Cover with plastic wrap and let sit at room temperature for 24 hours.
2. Line fine-mesh strainer with coffee filter and set over large liquid measuring cup. Place lid on press and slowly and evenly press plunger down on grounds to separate them from coffee concentrate. Pour concentrate into prepared strainer. Line large bowl with triple layer of cheesecloth that overhangs edges. Transfer grounds to cheesecloth. Gather edges of cheesecloth together and twist; then, holding pouch over strainer, firmly squeeze grounds until liquid no longer runs freely from pouch; discard grounds.
3. Using back of ladle or rubber spatula, gently stir concentrate to help filter it through strainer. Concentrate can be refrigerated in jar with tight-fitting lid for up to 3 days.
To Make Iced Coffee: Combine equal parts coffee concentrate and cold water. Add pinch kosher salt, if using, and pour into glass with ice.
More recipes HERE.

    Jack Bishop and Bridget Lancaster of America’s Test Kitchen share with us their recipe for making iced coffee:


    Cold-Brew Coffee Concentrate
    Makes about 11/2 cups; enough for 3 cups iced coffee
    Start today, enjoy tomorrow

        9    ounces medium-roast coffee beans, ground coarse (31/2 cups)
        31/2    cups filtered water, room temperature
            Kosher salt (optional)

    1. Stir coffee and water together in large (about 2‑quart) glass French press. Allow raft of ground coffee to form, about 10 minutes, then stir again to recombine. Cover with plastic wrap and let sit at room temperature for 24 hours.


    2. Line fine-mesh strainer with coffee filter and set over large liquid measuring cup. Place lid on press and slowly and evenly press plunger down on grounds to separate them from coffee concentrate. Pour concentrate into prepared strainer. Line large bowl with triple layer of cheesecloth that overhangs edges. Transfer grounds to cheesecloth. Gather edges of cheesecloth together and twist; then, holding pouch over strainer, firmly squeeze grounds until liquid no longer runs freely from pouch; discard grounds.


    3. Using back of ladle or rubber spatula, gently stir concentrate to help filter it through strainer. Concentrate can be refrigerated in jar with tight-fitting lid for up to 3 days.


    To Make Iced Coffee: Combine equal parts coffee concentrate and cold water. Add pinch kosher salt, if using, and pour into glass with ice.

    More recipes HERE.

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  1. Tomorrow, Jack Bishop and Bridget Lancaster of America’s Test Kitchen talk about recipes from their new book "D.I.Y. Cookbook" and answer questions from the Fresh Air team about summer grilling and other fresh ideas.
Hungry yet?

We will post recipes from their book on tomorrow’s NPR page. 
image via realfoodallergyfree View in High-Res

    Tomorrow, Jack Bishop and Bridget Lancaster of America’s Test Kitchen talk about recipes from their new book "D.I.Y. Cookbook" and answer questions from the Fresh Air team about summer grilling and other fresh ideas.

    Hungry yet?

    We will post recipes from their book on tomorrow’s NPR page. 

    image via realfoodallergyfree

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  1. Recipe: Hot Cocoa

    Jack Bishop mentioned this recipe on today’s Fresh Air and we couldn’t help but get the entire recipe.

    Serves 4 in small mugs

    Why This Recipe Works
    Our ideal hot cocoa recipe would give us serious chocolate flavor and a rich, satisfying consistency. We found that 1 1/2 tablespoons of cocoa powder sweetened with 1 tablespoon of sugar added enough chocolate flavor to our hot cocoa recipe without being overpowering. Many recipes recommend mixing cocoa powder and sugar with a little water before adding the milk, and we found this to be worthwhile. Water has the effect of releasing the cocoa powder’s fruit, chocolate, and coffee flavor nuances. We also discovered that heating the mixture of cocoa powder, sugar, and water for two minutes before adding milk further deepens the flavor.

    If you want to increase or decrease this recipe for hot cocoa, the key ratio to remember is one and one-half tablespoons of cocoa and one heaping tablespoon of sugar per cup of liquid. If you have whole milk on hand rather than low-fat, go ahead and use it, omitting the half-and-half.

    Ingredients

    6 tablespoons Dutch-processed cocoa powder, measured by dip-and-sweep

    4 tablespoons granulated sugar

    Pinch table salt

    1cup water

    3 cups low-fat milk (1 or 2 percent)

    1 teaspoon vanilla extract

    1/4 cup half-and-half

    Instructions

    1. In heavy 2-quart saucepan, whisk together cocoa, sugar, salt, and water over low heat until smooth. Simmer, whisking continuously, for 2 minutes, making sure whisk gets into the edges of pan.

    2. Add milk, increase heat to medium-low, and cook, stirring occasionally with whisk, until steam rises from surface and tiny bubbles form around edge, 12 to 15 minutes. Do not boil.

    3. Add vanilla and half-and-half. For foamy cocoa, beat hot cocoa with hand mixer or transfer to blender and blend until foamy. Divide between four mugs, top with whipped cream or marshmallows if desired, and serve immediately.

    Excerpted by permission of Cook’s Illustrated Magazine

  2. America's Test Kitchen

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    Cook's Ilustrated

  1. Your classic marinade … is to use a bottle of Italian salad dressing. And … the common thinking is that the acid — the vinegar in the salad dressing, or lemon juice, or red wine — is somehow tenderizing the meat. And you will read this in a lot of classic cooking manuals, that an acidic marinade will make meat more tender.

    "It will, in fact, make the outer layer of the meat a bit mushy, but what it’s really doing is pulling moisture out of the meat and making it drier. And there isn’t really a great way to tenderize a cut that’s going to be cooking very quickly for instance on the grill, but you can make it juicier, and juiciness, when it gets to eating the steak, often is equated with tenderness once it’s in our mouth.

    "So we use a salt-based marinade; you can use salt itself, you can use a salty ingredient like soy sauce, and then mix that with the garlic, with all the seasonings you want to use. And what you’re basically doing is, the salt penetrates very quickly into the meat and changes the structure of the muscle proteins, so that when the muscle proteins are cooked, they will hold on to more of their juices."

    - Jack Bishop on the myth of marinades

    Photo credit: Larry Crowe/AP

  2. Marinades

    Jack Bishop

    Cook's Illustrated

    The Science of Good Cooking

    America's Test Kitchen

    Fresh Air

  1. "Glutamates …[are] savory compounds; your taste receptors will pick that up and say wow, that’s nice and savory. But anchovies, in particular, they contain something else. It’s another compound called a nucleotide — and a nucleotide plus a glutamate basically is a savory explosion. It really amps up the flavor of the glutamates 20, 30, even perhaps 40 times. So if you’re tasting beef on its own, or soy sauce, or any of those glutamate-rich ingredients, your tongue will say wow that’s very beefy. You add something with nucleotides in it, say anchovies, and you’ll say this is the best beef stew ever. It tastes so much more meaty than meat."

    - Bridget Lancaster on why you might want to add anchovies to your beef stew

    Photo credit: Stefania Pomponi Butler

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  1. americastestkitchen:

America’s Test Kitchen shares Summer Cooking Tips with NPR’s Fresh Air.

yum.

    americastestkitchen:

    America’s Test Kitchen shares Summer Cooking Tips with NPR’s Fresh Air.

    yum.

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  1. How to Make Grilled Short Ribs (and other summer treats) View in High-Res

    How to Make Grilled Short Ribs (and other summer treats)

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  1. Some trusty and tried techniques for summer cooking from America’s Test Kitchen View in High-Res

    Some trusty and tried techniques for summer cooking from America’s Test Kitchen

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  1. Posted on 3 July, 2012

    52 notes | Permalink

    Reblogged from flooniloonio

    flooniloonio:

Bring Out The Barbie! (Taken with Instagram)

Today: grilling, bbqing, summer recipes, summer desserts. View in High-Res

    flooniloonio:

    Bring Out The Barbie! (Taken with Instagram)

    Today: grilling, bbqing, summer recipes, summer desserts.

  2. bbq

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  1. americastestkitchen:

Smoked Chicken
Surprisingly, the trick to perfecting smoke flavor isn’t getting the wood to smolder for as long as possible. It’s just the opposite: knowing when to let it burn out. This recipe produces tender, juicy meat with clean smoke flavor. Get the recipe.

Tomorrow: Summer BBQing tips from America’s Test Kitchen.

    americastestkitchen:

    Smoked Chicken

    Surprisingly, the trick to perfecting smoke flavor isn’t getting the wood to smolder for as long as possible. It’s just the opposite: knowing when to let it burn out. This recipe produces tender, juicy meat with clean smoke flavor. Get the recipe.

    Tomorrow: Summer BBQing tips from America’s Test Kitchen.

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