1. How did the NSA surveillance program come to be? Today we speak to the director of the new PBS Frontline series ‘United States of Secrets,’ Michael Kirk.  In the interview Kirk tells us how the Bush White House approved the creation of a surveillance program that would prevent future terrorist attacks—despite questionable legality:


"In the hours and the immediate days right after 9/11 everyone in Washington who had anything to do with intelligence or war fighting wanted to get tough, stop this from happening, react to what had happened in Washington and in New York. One of the people who was called for a solution to the problem was the head of the National Security Agency, a three-star Air Force general named Michael Hayden.
So Hayden drives to the Oval Office, the first meeting in his life that he’s in the Oval Office. The president who has been briefed about him, Andrew Card who we talked to and was the Chief of Staff says that he had never heard of Hayden and he’s pretty sure the President hadn’t either but they briefed the President and when Hayden goes into the White House, into the Oval Office, the President puts his arm around him and calls him ‘Mikey,’ his kindergarten nickname and Hayden presents what would eventually be called ‘The Program,’ a very aggressive collection of Internet data and telephone records and he says to the President, ‘But I’m worried about the legality of this,’ and the President looks at him and says, ‘Don’t worry about it. We’re going to go forward with this. I’ve got lawyers working on this now and you don’t have to worry about the legality of this; I think can do this on my own authority.’”


NOTE: This interview includes a segment with Bill Binney and Kirk Wiebe, former NSA analysts. 

Photo of President Bush and head of the NSA, Michael Hayden by Doug Mills 
View in High-Res

    How did the NSA surveillance program come to be? Today we speak to the director of the new PBS Frontline series ‘United States of Secrets,’ Michael Kirk.  In the interview Kirk tells us how the Bush White House approved the creation of a surveillance program that would prevent future terrorist attacks—despite questionable legality:

    "In the hours and the immediate days right after 9/11 everyone in Washington who had anything to do with intelligence or war fighting wanted to get tough, stop this from happening, react to what had happened in Washington and in New York. One of the people who was called for a solution to the problem was the head of the National Security Agency, a three-star Air Force general named Michael Hayden.

    So Hayden drives to the Oval Office, the first meeting in his life that he’s in the Oval Office. The president who has been briefed about him, Andrew Card who we talked to and was the Chief of Staff says that he had never heard of Hayden and he’s pretty sure the President hadn’t either but they briefed the President and when Hayden goes into the White House, into the Oval Office, the President puts his arm around him and calls him ‘Mikey,’ his kindergarten nickname and Hayden presents what would eventually be called ‘The Program,’ a very aggressive collection of Internet data and telephone records and he says to the President, ‘But I’m worried about the legality of this,’ and the President looks at him and says, ‘Don’t worry about it. We’re going to go forward with this. I’ve got lawyers working on this now and you don’t have to worry about the legality of this; I think can do this on my own authority.’”

    NOTE: This interview includes a segment with Bill Binney and Kirk Wiebe, former NSA analysts. 

    Photo of President Bush and head of the NSA, Michael Hayden by Doug Mills 

  2. NSA

    president bush

    9/11

    edward snowden

  1. Tomorrow:  Dexter Filkins, reporter for The New Yorker talks about Iran’s involvement in Syria and Iran’s possible motives and objectives. He speaks about Iran’s Quds Force and what they’re doing on the ground in Syria.
His 2008 book “The Forever War" was a National Bestseller. It explores the wars following 9/11 and the human cost of America’s conflict with Islamic fundamentalism.



photo of Syria via the Washington Post View in High-Res

    Tomorrow:  Dexter Filkins, reporter for The New Yorker talks about Iran’s involvement in Syria and Iran’s possible motives and objectives. He speaks about Iran’s Quds Force and what they’re doing on the ground in Syria.


    His 2008 book “The Forever War" was a National Bestseller. It explores the wars following 9/11 and the human cost of America’s conflict with Islamic fundamentalism.

    photo of Syria via the Washington Post

  2. fresh air

    interview

    Dexter Filkins

    the new yorker

    syria

    iran

    quds force

    9/11

  1. In remembrance of 9/11:

    A year ago we interviewed the women behind the Penn Vet Working Dog Center, a center that trains and researches search and rescue dogs.

    Cynthia Otto, founder of the center, previously worked at Ground Zero with dogs to find survivors in the rubble. She has done extensive research following the lives and health of the dogs that served there.

    Annemarie DeAngelo joins Otto as the founder of the New Jersey Canine Unit (and director of the Penn center). In her 14 years of working with dogs she has found missing children, criminals, and narcotics using canine science.

    Puppy-in-training Bretagne is also at the mic, as you’ll hear. She’s currently in search and rescue puppy college.

    Also, protective goggles for dogs are called “doggles.” You’re welcome.

    If you’re interested in more about the center here is their site:

    http://pennvetwdc.org/

  2. fresh air

    interview

    penn vet working dog center

    9/11

    puppies

    search and rescue

  1. Meet Bretagne, one of our guests in the studio today. She was named after Bretagne Corliss, a dog who deployed to the World Trade Center after the attacks of 9/11. Bretagne is getting trained at the Penn Vet Working Dog Center, which studies search and rescue dogs and trains future working dogs.

    Dr. Cynthia Otto is the Center’s director and a veterinarian who specializes in emergency, critical and disaster medicine. She also served on a team that cared for search and rescue dogs after 9/11.

    On September 11th, we’ll talk with Dr. Cynthia Otto and Annemarie DeAngelo, the Center’s training director and New Jersey State Police Canine Unit founder, about the health, life, and training of a working dog.

    (Please note the cooing of Fresh Air staff in the video.)

  2. 9/11

    Fresh Air

    working dogs

    Penn Vet Working Dog Center

  1. Posted on 27 July, 2011

    139 notes | Permalink

    Reblogged from wnyc

    wnyc:

WNYC is creating a special playlist of music of all genres suggested  by listeners to mark the 10-year anniversary of 9/11, to stream online and play on air. Respond below or online: What do you want to hear?
View in High-Res

    wnyc:

    WNYC is creating a special playlist of music of all genres suggested by listeners to mark the 10-year anniversary of 9/11, to stream online and play on air. Respond below or online: What do you want to hear?

  2. wnyc

    music

    9/11