1. I’m hoping Mitt Romney can get his act together in this debate because as a conservative pundit, or rather, playing a conserve pundit…it’s so difficult for me right now to get behind Mitt Romney. It’s incredibly frustrating as a performer who has to model behavior that is so schizophrenic and bifurcated because it’s almost an unprecedented candidacy – as far as I can tell. No one seems to like him – even the people who are behind him. There isn’t a sort of monolithic point of view to base my own satire on.

    Basically, the satire of my character in relation to Mitt Romney now is night to night, I can change my mind and I can be hopeful or in despair from night to night because I have no point of reference for what’s happening now. Even McCain in 2008 post-Lehman Brothers might have seemed like a bit of a winged duck, but people still liked him. People were still behind him.

    You get a feeling that everybody of the sort that I’m modeling really has one foot out of the boat right now and I really I hope Mitt – I mean listen I have my own political views, but as a performer I hope he does something positive tonight so that there’s something for me to rally behind because that’s what my character wants to do… He wants to have a champion that he can champion and that just doesn’t exist in Mitt Romney right now. He’s just a walking wound.

    — Stephen Colbert on how his character wants Mitt Romney to do well in the presidential debate in Denver

  2. Stephen Colbert

    Mitt Romney

    presidential debate

    2012 election

    The Colbert Report

  1. nprradiopictures:



Voices From First And Main: What Matters To Swing-State VotersIn the run-up to the presidential election, Morning Edition visited communities in swing states — in fact, in swing counties — that are predictably unpredictable when it comes to voting. We wanted to hear from voters where they live — to understand what’s shaping their thinking this election year.
Credits: Nelson Hsu, Becky Lettenberger, John W. Poole / NPR


For your pre-presidential debate enjoyment. View in High-Res

    nprradiopictures:

    Voices From First And Main: What Matters To Swing-State Voters

    In the run-up to the presidential election, Morning Edition visited communities in swing states — in fact, in swing counties — that are predictably unpredictable when it comes to voting. We wanted to hear from voters where they live — to understand what’s shaping their thinking this election year.

    Credits: Nelson Hsu, Becky Lettenberger, John W. Poole / NPR

    For your pre-presidential debate enjoyment.

  2. swing states

    2012 election

  1. "The budget deficit is overwhelmingly about Medicare. It’s overwhelmingly about the fact that most Americans will pay much less in Medicare taxes than they will get in Medicare benefits – even though people don’t always realize that. They think they pay for their Medicare, but the typical person does not come close to doing so. So neither party has a plan to get it into balance.

    "But both parties have a plan that — if you think about it – philosophically would make a difference, would reduce the long-term Medicare deficit. And so we don’t have to get too precise and say, ‘Well, neither of them has a plan that works and thus, neither one of them has a plan that is meaningful at all.’ They do each have meaningful plans.

    "The Democrats’ plan is to make much less of a change to Medicare than Republicans would. It is to say, through a variety of ways, we want to reduce the growth rate of Medicare spending. We want to say, if there is scientific evidence that suggests that this expensive new treatment doesn’t actually make you healthier, well, over the long term Medicare may not reimburse for that treatment, as much as it would for a treatment that there is scientific evidence. You could still get it, but you’d have to pay for it. It takes baby steps in that direction. Many health experts wish it would go farther, but when you think about the whole debate over death panels, you realize why this is tricky terrain. …

    "In a sense, they try to take Medicare and they try to say, we’re going to make it more efficient. We’re going to have it so the government is not so often paying for healthcare that doesn’t make people healthier. And the government needs to make those decisions because Medicare is a government program.

    "The [representatives] say, ‘No, no, no.’ The whole thing, to some extent, is broken and what we need to do is turn it over to the private market. And competition will take care of this problem. And so the government will give you a chunk of money. You can go out; you can buy your own plan. And by competing for your business, the plans will get rid of those inefficiencies in Medicare. The Republicans have backed off a little bit from some of that.

    "In the original Paul Ryan plan, you had to move to that if you were 55 and under – everyone 55 and older got to remain in Medicare. In the new plan, it’s sort of an option. But I don’t think there’s any doubt that philosophically that’s what the Republicans want to move more toward. And you can make an argument that it will make a big difference. There’s always some reason to doubt that it would because historically, the record of market competition working in health care is very mixed. It’s worked for things like laser surgery. It hasn’t worked so well for things like heart surgery or cancer care."

    David Leonhardt on how Democrats and Republicans differ on Medicare

  2. David Leonhardt

    Medicare

    2012 election

  1. They’ve come to the conclusion that [his campaign] needs to find a way to talk about what his faith means to him without talking about the individual tenets. And what’d they like to do — and I know what they’re talking about doing — is talk about how as a church leader, he helped people who were disadvantaged, that this was the way this very, very wealthy man heading a private equity company in Boston was able to meet with people who might have been poor or disadvantage in various ways as a church leader.

    — Michael Kranish on the role of Rommey’s faith in the campaign

  2. Mitt Romney

    Mormonism

    2012 election

  1. When he looked at the race, he saw Rudy Giuliani, the former New York mayor, and John McCain, the senator from Arizona – they were the big boys in the center, if you will, in the Republican Party. There was no room for Mitt Romney there. Where there was room was on the right.

    — Scott Helman on Romney’s move to the right during the 2008 Republican primary

  2. Mitt Romney

    Scott Helman

    2012 election

    2008 election

  1. Whatever you think of Mitt Romney, whatever you think of his tenure at Bain, whatever you think of Bain Capital or private equity, I think we have to stipulate that Mitt Romney certainly has some economic fluency. He has trafficked in this world for years and I think there is certainly some truth to his statement that he knows how jobs come and he knows how jobs go. So I think he is largely correct to say that he has some significant understanding of how the American economy works, but I think it’s a different question entirely, when we’re saying, do we want this kind of man to be our leader? Do we want somebody who is very successful making money for very wealthy people running the economy that’s supposed to be for everybody? And I think that’s where his pitch is a little less persuasive.

    — Scott Helman On Romney’s Experience at Bain Capital

  2. Mitt Romney

    Bain Capital

    2012 election

    Scott Helman