1. Ken Tucker reviews Carlene Carter's new album Carter Girl, an album that offers “a fresh take on classic songs:”

 What Carlene Carter does on this album is significant. She doesn’t approach these old songs as sacred relics to be enshrined with pious respect. Rather, she treats them like living, vital pieces of art that can withstand being taken apart, thought about, and re-imagined. Take, for example, “Lonesome Valley.” It’s a song that was itself an interpretation of a public-domain composition when the Carter Family recorded it, and has subsequently been sung many different ways, by Woody Guthrie, Joan Baez, and on the soundtrack of the Coen Brothers film O Brother Where Art Thou, to name just a few. Carlene has taken back the song, added some of her own lyrics about deaths in her family, plays some wonderful piano, and sings harmony on the chorus with Vince Gill. In the process, she comes up with her own excellent piece of work.


photo by Sasha Haagensen /GettyImages View in High-Res

    Ken Tucker reviews Carlene Carter's new album Carter Girl, an album that offers “a fresh take on classic songs:”

     What Carlene Carter does on this album is significant. She doesn’t approach these old songs as sacred relics to be enshrined with pious respect. Rather, she treats them like living, vital pieces of art that can withstand being taken apart, thought about, and re-imagined. Take, for example, “Lonesome Valley.” It’s a song that was itself an interpretation of a public-domain composition when the Carter Family recorded it, and has subsequently been sung many different ways, by Woody Guthrie, Joan Baez, and on the soundtrack of the Coen Brothers film O Brother Where Art Thou, to name just a few. Carlene has taken back the song, added some of her own lyrics about deaths in her family, plays some wonderful piano, and sings harmony on the chorus with Vince Gill. In the process, she comes up with her own excellent piece of work.

    photo by Sasha Haagensen /GettyImages

  2. carlene carter

    june carter cash

    country music

    woody guthrie

    joan baez

    ken tucker

    review