1. Today Roy Scranton and Jake Siegel, two veterans from the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan join us to talk about their wartime experiences and the process of writing about them. Scranton explains how he coped with the constant fear of death:

I found that I had to shut down my imagination because it really turned into an enemy. The kind of daydreaming and extrapolation of ideas that I love to indulge in as a reader and as a writer was suddenly and completely maladaptive to the situation in Baghdad. The more I could imagine what could happen, the more different ways I thought I could die or fail or mess things up and it just would turn paralyzing. That’s where I started to tell myself that it doesn’t matter: "None of it matters; you’re already dead. Just get through your job."




photo via flickr commons View in High-Res

    Today Roy Scranton and Jake Siegel, two veterans from the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan join us to talk about their wartime experiences and the process of writing about them. Scranton explains how he coped with the constant fear of death:

    I found that I had to shut down my imagination because it really turned into an enemy. The kind of daydreaming and extrapolation of ideas that I love to indulge in as a reader and as a writer was suddenly and completely maladaptive to the situation in Baghdad. The more I could imagine what could happen, the more different ways I thought I could die or fail or mess things up and it just would turn paralyzing. That’s where I started to tell myself that it doesn’t matter: "None of it matters; you’re already dead. Just get through your job."

    photo via flickr commons

  2. fresh air

    interview

    veterans day

    roy scranton

    jake siegal

    afghanistan war

    iraq war

    death

    fear