1. The notorious leader of the Mexican gang and cartel Zetas, Miguel Angel Treviño Morales, has been captured alive. Reporter Alfredo Corchado who is a specialist in gang and cartel violence wrote, that his capture is “the biggest victory against organized crime for the presidency of Enrique Peña Nieto. The Zetas’ rise to power in Mexico changed the dynamics and ushered in a new era of violence across the country.”
We recently had Alfredo Corchado on the show to discuss is book Midnight in Mexico. In his interview he spoke about the corruption in Mexico and the responsibility of journalists,

Yes, there’s a lot of cynicism: what we really do; does it really matter? People know about the corruption, butI think when you start putting names, putting faces to what seems at times to be ghosts, I think it really changes the way people think about things. And I think it’s also a homage to our profession as journalists. I go from Mexico City where there’s, you know, people beginning to make whole government accountable, to a place like … Laredo where people don’t know much about upcoming elections or about what happened or why three or four bodies appear, and you see the difference and I think you understand and respect the value of journalism that much more.

photo (Zetas gang tattoo) via Latino Fox News View in High-Res

    The notorious leader of the Mexican gang and cartel Zetas, Miguel Angel Treviño Morales, has been captured alive. Reporter Alfredo Corchado who is a specialist in gang and cartel violence wrote, that his capture is “the biggest victory against organized crime for the presidency of Enrique Peña Nieto. The Zetas’ rise to power in Mexico changed the dynamics and ushered in a new era of violence across the country.”

    We recently had Alfredo Corchado on the show to discuss is book Midnight in Mexico. In his interview he spoke about the corruption in Mexico and the responsibility of journalists,

    Yes, there’s a lot of cynicism: what we really do; does it really matter? People know about the corruption, butI think when you start putting names, putting faces to what seems at times to be ghosts, I think it really changes the way people think about things. And I think it’s also a homage to our profession as journalists. I go from Mexico City where there’s, you know, people beginning to make whole government accountable, to a place like … Laredo where people don’t know much about upcoming elections or about what happened or why three or four bodies appear, and you see the difference and I think you understand and respect the value of journalism that much more.

    photo (Zetas gang tattoo) via Latino Fox News

  2. fresh air

    interview

    alfredo corchado

    gang violence

    zetas

    midnight in mexico