1. Robert Caro, who has spent the past 37 years, writing his multi-volume biography of Lyndon Johnson, tells Dave Davies about how Johnson was a “great reader of men”:

When a new aide, a young aide [arrived] … he’d tell them how to talk to someone. He’d say, ‘Watch their eyes. Watch their hands. What they’re telling you with their eyes or their hands is more important than what they’re telling you with their mouth.’ He used to say, ‘Never let a conversation end because there’s always something that the man doesn’t want to tell you and the longer a conversation goes on, the easier it is for you to figure out what it is he doesn’t want to tell you.’ He had a unique ability to know what a man really wanted, what a man really was afraid of and of playing on those fears and those desires.”

LBJLibrary photo by Yoichi Okakmoto

    Robert Caro, who has spent the past 37 years, writing his multi-volume biography of Lyndon Johnson, tells Dave Davies about how Johnson was a “great reader of men”:

    When a new aide, a young aide [arrived] … he’d tell them how to talk to someone. He’d say, ‘Watch their eyes. Watch their hands. What they’re telling you with their eyes or their hands is more important than what they’re telling you with their mouth.’ He used to say, ‘Never let a conversation end because there’s always something that the man doesn’t want to tell you and the longer a conversation goes on, the easier it is for you to figure out what it is he doesn’t want to tell you.’ He had a unique ability to know what a man really wanted, what a man really was afraid of and of playing on those fears and those desires.”

    LBJLibrary photo by Yoichi Okakmoto

  2. Fresh Air

    Interviews

    Robert Caro

    The Passage Of Power

    Lyndon Johnson