1. Civil Rights leader James Farmer Jr. spoke to Terry Gross in 1985 about why he got involved in CORE (the Congress of Racial Equality): "At that time, I was a pacifist — a conscientious objector from World War II — and as a pacifist, I was concerned with finding non-violent solutions to violent conflict situations domestically. But my primary interest was, of course, race. And therefore, I was driven to study Gandhi, an architect of the technique which he called satyagraha, meaning soul force. We have come to call it non-violent direct action, or non-violent resistance.” [complete interview here] View in High-Res

    Civil Rights leader James Farmer Jr. spoke to Terry Gross in 1985 about why he got involved in CORE (the Congress of Racial Equality): "At that time, I was a pacifist — a conscientious objector from World War II — and as a pacifist, I was concerned with finding non-violent solutions to violent conflict situations domestically. But my primary interest was, of course, race. And therefore, I was driven to study Gandhi, an architect of the technique which he called satyagraha, meaning soul force. We have come to call it non-violent direct action, or non-violent resistance.” [complete interview here]

  2. civil rights

    freedom riders

    james farmer jr.

    gandhi

    non-violent resistance

    CORE