1. Lyndon Johnson biographer Robert Caro tells Dave Davies about how how civil rights leaders of the era regarded Johnson:

They come in suspicious, you know. Johnson always wanted to meet with people one-on-one. … A friend of his said, ‘One-on-one he’s the greatest salesman who ever lived.’ So a group of civil rights leaders — Martin Luther King, Roy Wilkins, James Farmer — want to meet with him. One of his secretaries says, ‘Should I schedule them as a group?’ And he says to her, ‘No, one at a time,’ and each one has the same reaction. … I think it’s Roy Qilkins who says this: that ‘[I] went in there suspicious and then Johnson pulled up almost knee-to-knee me and leaned into my face and told me how much he wanted civil rights and for the first time I had real hope that this bill was going to pass.’”

Image of LBJ and Martin Luther King, Jr. via Anglonautes View in High-Res

    Lyndon Johnson biographer Robert Caro tells Dave Davies about how how civil rights leaders of the era regarded Johnson:

    They come in suspicious, you know. Johnson always wanted to meet with people one-on-one. … A friend of his said, ‘One-on-one he’s the greatest salesman who ever lived.’ So a group of civil rights leaders — Martin Luther King, Roy Wilkins, James Farmer — want to meet with him. One of his secretaries says, ‘Should I schedule them as a group?’ And he says to her, ‘No, one at a time,’ and each one has the same reaction. … I think it’s Roy Qilkins who says this: that ‘[I] went in there suspicious and then Johnson pulled up almost knee-to-knee me and leaned into my face and told me how much he wanted civil rights and for the first time I had real hope that this bill was going to pass.’”

    Image of LBJ and Martin Luther King, Jr. via Anglonautes

  2. Fresh Air

    Interviews

    Robert Caro

    Lyndon Johnson

    The Passage of Power

    martin luther king

    Civil Rights