1. Today on the show we spoke with marathoner and Runner’s World contributor Amby Burfoot. Burfoot, 66, won the Boston Marathon in 1968 and has run it every five years since. He was there but didn’t ‘t finish because of the attack. He reflected to Terry about the importance of having people cheer for you while you run:

Oh, it’s so important to have people that you care about cheering for you as you run because people have this notion that running is about having long legs or big lungs or something, but it’s really all emotional and all mental. And the people who are supporting you — be it at the course or knowing that your family and friends are going to be waiting for you at the finish line — is a huge part of the drive to get there and be reunited with them and to celebrate what everybody has experienced on the day, and the fact that was so violently interrupted yesterday was a real tragedy.

On a related note, Jezebel ran a lovely piece yesterday about "The People Who Watch Marathons" by Erin Gloria Ryan. She writes to the point that Burfoot talks about above: that cheers really do cheer a runner on. That a marathon, with its give-and-take relationship between runner and watcher, brings out the best in everyone — our desire to challenge ourselves as well as our impulse to encourage each other in the process. A recommended read.
Image via Zero To Boston

    Today on the show we spoke with marathoner and Runner’s World contributor Amby Burfoot. Burfoot, 66, won the Boston Marathon in 1968 and has run it every five years since. He was there but didn’t ‘t finish because of the attack. He reflected to Terry about the importance of having people cheer for you while you run:

    Oh, it’s so important to have people that you care about cheering for you as you run because people have this notion that running is about having long legs or big lungs or something, but it’s really all emotional and all mental. And the people who are supporting you — be it at the course or knowing that your family and friends are going to be waiting for you at the finish line — is a huge part of the drive to get there and be reunited with them and to celebrate what everybody has experienced on the day, and the fact that was so violently interrupted yesterday was a real tragedy.

    On a related note, Jezebel ran a lovely piece yesterday about "The People Who Watch Marathons" by Erin Gloria Ryan. She writes to the point that Burfoot talks about above: that cheers really do cheer a runner on. That a marathon, with its give-and-take relationship between runner and watcher, brings out the best in everyone — our desire to challenge ourselves as well as our impulse to encourage each other in the process. A recommended read.

    Image via Zero To Boston

  2. Fresh Air

    Interviews

    Amby Burfoot

    Boston Marathon

    Jezebel

    The People Who Watch Marathons

    Erin Gloria Ryan