1. Novelist Mohsin Hamid, who lives in Lahore, Pakistan, talks to Terry Gross about living in cities with a reputation for violence:

In a way, I think if you live in a city or a place where violence is common, then it perhaps doesn’t matter so much if the violence is the likelihood [of] somebody [who’s] going to mug you or attack you in your house or they’re going to blow you up in your barber shop. Violent cities, people who live in violent cities, find a way — as New Yorkers did 30 or 40 years ago — they find a way to just carry on. But you’re stressed out. You’re worried, you know. There’s times when they, for example, will turn off all the cell phone service in Lahore and you can’t make a phone call because they’re scared [that] on a particular religious holiday somebody will use a cell phone to detonate a bomb or coordinate a terrorist attack. You know, that’s freaky when those things happen. In fact, once recently we had a hospital emergency where my father was unwell and we had to take him to hospital but we had no mobile phones. We couldn’t call his doctor, you know. These things happen in daily life and, yeah, it’s upsetting and unsettling.”

Image via Dirty Old 1970s New York City

    Novelist Mohsin Hamid, who lives in Lahore, Pakistan, talks to Terry Gross about living in cities with a reputation for violence:

    In a way, I think if you live in a city or a place where violence is common, then it perhaps doesn’t matter so much if the violence is the likelihood [of] somebody [who’s] going to mug you or attack you in your house or they’re going to blow you up in your barber shop. Violent cities, people who live in violent cities, find a way — as New Yorkers did 30 or 40 years ago — they find a way to just carry on. But you’re stressed out. You’re worried, you know. There’s times when they, for example, will turn off all the cell phone service in Lahore and you can’t make a phone call because they’re scared [that] on a particular religious holiday somebody will use a cell phone to detonate a bomb or coordinate a terrorist attack. You know, that’s freaky when those things happen. In fact, once recently we had a hospital emergency where my father was unwell and we had to take him to hospital but we had no mobile phones. We couldn’t call his doctor, you know. These things happen in daily life and, yeah, it’s upsetting and unsettling.”

    Image via Dirty Old 1970s New York City

  2. Fresh Air

    Interviews

    Mohsin Hamid

    How To Get Filthy Rich In Rising Asia

    Books

    Fiction

    Lahore

    Pakistan

    New York City