1. Andrea Stuart tells Terry Gross about how her research and knowledge into her family’s history with slavery changed the way she thought about sugar:

It was not until I was reading some of the work by the abolitionists and … one of their big … campaigns was that it was ‘blood-stained sugar,’ … that it carried the blood of slaves, and I remember actually at that point putting some sugar into something and thinking, ‘Ah, it’s this!’ And … I thought again about the way that commodities — in my case it was sugar; in America the parallels would be, as I say, cotton or tobacco — how these … commodities have such real, visceral impacts on the way our lives unfold and how extraordinary that is.


Image by Nadine Bekavak via Flickr Commons

    Andrea Stuart tells Terry Gross about how her research and knowledge into her family’s history with slavery changed the way she thought about sugar:

    It was not until I was reading some of the work by the abolitionists and … one of their big … campaigns was that it was ‘blood-stained sugar,’ … that it carried the blood of slaves, and I remember actually at that point putting some sugar into something and thinking, ‘Ah, it’s this!’ And … I thought again about the way that commodities — in my case it was sugar; in America the parallels would be, as I say, cotton or tobacco — how these … commodities have such real, visceral impacts on the way our lives unfold and how extraordinary that is.

    Image by Nadine Bekavak via Flickr Commons

  2. Fresh Air

    Reviews

    Andrea Stuart

    Sugar In the Blood

    Barbados

    Slavery