1. In 1951, Henrietta Lacks, a poor African-American woman, died of cervical cancer. But her cells became immortal and continued to grow. They were used for tens of thousands of experiments without the consent or knowledge of her family. Medical writer Rebecca Skloot examines the legacy of Lacks’ contribution to science — and the effect that has had on her family — in her book The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks.  View in High-Res

    In 1951, Henrietta Lacks, a poor African-American woman, died of cervical cancer. But her cells became immortal and continued to grow. They were used for tens of thousands of experiments without the consent or knowledge of her family. Medical writer Rebecca Skloot examines the legacy of Lacks’ contribution to science — and the effect that has had on her family — in her book The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks

  2. science

    henrietta lacks

    the immortal life of henrietta lacks

    rebecca skloot

    fresh air