1. Stephen Colbert on creating his Super PAC

The whole thing came about by accident. We were just trying to do a parody ad of a Tim Pawlenty ad, and I couldn’t figure out how to end it. And then I said, ‘Well how does his ad end?’ And his ad ended with just a simple card on the screen that said, ‘LibertyPAC.com’ — whatever his political action committee was. And I said, ‘Okay, just put a ColbertPAC.com at the end and one person on the staff said, ‘Do you want me to buy that url?’ And I said, ‘Yeah, yeah — we might want to use that later.’
And then the network called and said, ‘Are you really going to get a PAC?’ And I said, ‘Why do you ask?’ And they said, ‘Because if you actually get a PAC, that could be trouble.’ And I said, ‘Well then I’m definitely going to do it.’ Because I like the idea of, why is it trouble? Everybody can do it, why can’t I do it? … We’d done jokes on Citizens United for about a year, and then I realized, ‘Oh, well this is what the whole year is about. It’s really about this whole new flush of cash into our political system that is in large part untraceable or traceable only after the fact when it’s too late, after the primaries, after the elections is over. And I said, ‘OK, well let’s just try to do it’…
We really played the game hard up through the South Carolina primary, when Jon Stewart took over my Super PAC, because I announced my plans to form an exploratory committee about whether or not I should run for president, to illustrate how easy it is to give money to somebody else and really have control over what happens. Ostensibly it’s no longer in your control, but you’ve given it to your best friend, who actually rides to work with you this morning and you share a building.
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    Stephen Colbert on creating his Super PAC

    The whole thing came about by accident. We were just trying to do a parody ad of a Tim Pawlenty ad, and I couldn’t figure out how to end it. And then I said, ‘Well how does his ad end?’ And his ad ended with just a simple card on the screen that said, ‘LibertyPAC.com’ — whatever his political action committee was. And I said, ‘Okay, just put a ColbertPAC.com at the end and one person on the staff said, ‘Do you want me to buy that url?’ And I said, ‘Yeah, yeah — we might want to use that later.’

    And then the network called and said, ‘Are you really going to get a PAC?’ And I said, ‘Why do you ask?’ And they said, ‘Because if you actually get a PAC, that could be trouble.’ And I said, ‘Well then I’m definitely going to do it.’ Because I like the idea of, why is it trouble? Everybody can do it, why can’t I do it? … We’d done jokes on Citizens United for about a year, and then I realized, ‘Oh, well this is what the whole year is about. It’s really about this whole new flush of cash into our political system that is in large part untraceable or traceable only after the fact when it’s too late, after the primaries, after the elections is over. And I said, ‘OK, well let’s just try to do it’…

    We really played the game hard up through the South Carolina primary, when Jon Stewart took over my Super PAC, because I announced my plans to form an exploratory committee about whether or not I should run for president, to illustrate how easy it is to give money to somebody else and really have control over what happens. Ostensibly it’s no longer in your control, but you’ve given it to your best friend, who actually rides to work with you this morning and you share a building.

  2. Stephen Colbert

    Super PAC

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