1. Cider, the alcoholic quaff of a young democracy, underwent a linguistic  makeover after Prohibition.  It became cider, the nonalcoholic juice of  the pressed apple — fit for even children and temperate adults. (Even  today, it’s only Americans who call the unfermented, raw juice of the  apple “cider.” Everywhere else, “cider” still has a buzz.) Today, we  think of cider primarily as something sweet to drink. We pack it on  lunch outings. We drink it after school. We drink it hot and spiced  after raking leaves. We even drink it after giving blood. View in High-Res

    Cider, the alcoholic quaff of a young democracy, underwent a linguistic makeover after Prohibition.  It became cider, the nonalcoholic juice of the pressed apple — fit for even children and temperate adults. (Even today, it’s only Americans who call the unfermented, raw juice of the apple “cider.” Everywhere else, “cider” still has a buzz.) Today, we think of cider primarily as something sweet to drink. We pack it on lunch outings. We drink it after school. We drink it hot and spiced after raking leaves. We even drink it after giving blood.

  2. apple cider

    cider