1. Songster Dom Flemons, formerly of the Carolina Chocolate Drops, joins Fresh Air to play songs from his new solo album, Prospect Hill. 
One of the fun parts of the interview is when he does impressions of Bob Dylan and Dave Van Ronk. 
Terry asked him why he impersonates certain singers:

"The idea that I had in my 16-year-old mind is that I’d hear these songs and no one else knew what these songs were so I’d try my best to replicate them so that people would get a sense of the song as it was performed by the original performer. At that time I didn’t feel like I had any interesting stories. After being in the business for about 15 years, just about now, I have some stories of my own. But at first, I didn’t really have stories so I would tell other people’s stories."


Photo of Flemons by Tim Duffy View in High-Res

    Songster Dom Flemons, formerly of the Carolina Chocolate Drops, joins Fresh Air to play songs from his new solo album, Prospect Hill.

    One of the fun parts of the interview is when he does impressions of Bob Dylan and Dave Van Ronk

    Terry asked him why he impersonates certain singers:

    "The idea that I had in my 16-year-old mind is that I’d hear these songs and no one else knew what these songs were so I’d try my best to replicate them so that people would get a sense of the song as it was performed by the original performer. At that time I didn’t feel like I had any interesting stories. After being in the business for about 15 years, just about now, I have some stories of my own. But at first, I didn’t really have stories so I would tell other people’s stories."

    Photo of Flemons by Tim Duffy

  2. dom flemons

    carolina chocolate drops

    banjo

    folk music

    bob dylan

    dave van ronk

    fresh air

    terry gross

  1. Posted on 30 July, 2014

    1,925 notes | Permalink

    Reblogged from airows

  2. abandoned

    photography

    china

  1. Fresh Air tech contributor Alexis Madgrigal writes that Pinterest could be a competitor with Google search: 

    Pinterest is mostly known as a place people go to find things to buy or make. The company likes to say that Pinterest is about planning your future, but it’s also just about seeing – visually — a bunch of interesting stuff on a theme, all in one place. So there are boards for wedding planning and child rearing and men’s linen suits, but also for kittens and model airplanes and mountains. Some boards are just a mood like “monumental” or “cute” or “adventurous.”

    Despite this popularity, Pinterest has never attracted the same kind of press or adulation as the companies that grew up around the same time — businesses like Instagram, Uber or even Dropbox. Pinterest just isn’t seen as a hardcore technology company that will follow the path of Google and Facebook. To some people, it doesn’t feel like a world-shaping product. “It’s just a digital scrapbook,” people say.

    But Internet companies are valuable in large part because of the kind of data that they possess. And Pinterest possesses some really, really interesting data. The first part of it is that they are a repository of things that people would like to have or do. They’re a database of intentions. And that has got to be valuable to marketers and advertisers.

    But it goes deeper than that. What Pinterest has created — almost unintentionally — is a database of things in the world that matter to human beings. While Google crunches numbers to figure out what’s relevant, Pinterest’s human users define what is relevant for a given topic. And because of that, they could become a legitimate competitor to Google, the world’s most valuable Internet company.

    Read the full essay

  2. pinterest

    google

    technology

    alexis madrigal

  1. How to play Bones with today’s guest, Dom Flemons.

    Prospect Hill is Flemons’ first album since leaving the Grammy award-winning Carolina Chocolate Drops.

  2. dom flemons

    carolina chocolate drops

    folk

    country

    music

  1. A rare photo of Mt. Fuji’s shadow via LAEM View in High-Res

    A rare photo of Mt. Fuji’s shadow via LAEM

  2. mt. fuji

    japan

    mountain

  1. At age 26, Robert Timberg was a handsome young man in uniform. That was before a land mine in Vietnam left him so disfigured that he terrified little children on the street. Dr. Lynn Ketchum, a respected plastic surgeon who did reconstructive surgery on many injured soldiers, wrote in his personal journal that he had many patients in his career with facial burns, but none as bad as Bob Timberg. Timberg’s new memoir, called Blue Eyed Boy, is the story of his long struggle to recover from his wounds and find his place in the civilian world.
Listen to the interview. 

    At age 26, Robert Timberg was a handsome young man in uniform. That was before a land mine in Vietnam left him so disfigured that he terrified little children on the street. Dr. Lynn Ketchum, a respected plastic surgeon who did reconstructive surgery on many injured soldiers, wrote in his personal journal that he had many patients in his career with facial burns, but none as bad as Bob Timberg. Timberg’s new memoir, called Blue Eyed Boy, is the story of his long struggle to recover from his wounds and find his place in the civilian world.

    Listen to the interview. 

  2. vietnam

    war

    veteran

    injury

    memoir

    interview

    fresh air

  1. Fresh Air book critic Maureen Corrigan reviews Ride Around Shining

    Most sports novels are about the aspiration to excel physically: to run faster, stretch out one’s arms farther.  The really cool thing about Ride Around Shining, a debut novel by Chris Leslie-Hynan, is that it doesn’t stick to that familiar rulebook.   Even though it’s set in the world of pro basketball, our narrator here is not the guy who aspires to be a great player; rather, he’s the guy who aspires to be a great suck-up to the great player.  Jess, as our narrator is called, is a white bread grad student, finishing his “second useless degree.”   One day, he hears that a player for the Portland Trail Blazers, named Calyph West, is looking for a chauffeur and Jess lands the job.  Thus, begins Jess’s life of eager servitude, driving Calyph around in his “entry level” Jag, waiting on the party guests who swarm into Calyph’s McMansion on weekends, and even helping Calyph to dress, choosing from his array of beautiful suits, in pearl gray, honey butter and pinstripe silver

    If your literary allusion antennae have begun twitching, you’ve read your Fitzgerald.  This novel about nouveau riche excess, social class, and hero worship references The Great Gatsby on practically every page, beginning with Jess’s retrospective Nick Carroway-like narration, as well as that premise of a white chauffeur driving around his rich black passenger—that’s a scene that mirrors the famous “Queensboro Bridge” passage in Gatsby.

  2. ride around shining

    the great gatsby

    fitzgerald

    maureen corrigan

  1. Ken Tucker reviews Jenny Lewis' new album, Voyager : 

"Lewis’ strength as a singer is that she’s a powerful vocalist who rarely shows off her chops—like the once and future actress she is, she knows how to modulate the emotions she puts out there, holding back to achieve some of her best effects. This is a quality showcased on a song produced by Beck called “Just One of the Guys.” The song is getting some attention for its video, which features Lewis singing alongside gal pals including Anne Hathaway and Kristen Stewart, but you don’t need the visuals to lock into the hypnotic allure of the melody.”


View in High-Res

    Ken Tucker reviews Jenny Lewis' new album, Voyager : 

    "Lewis’ strength as a singer is that she’s a powerful vocalist who rarely shows off her chops—like the once and future actress she is, she knows how to modulate the emotions she puts out there, holding back to achieve some of her best effects. This is a quality showcased on a song produced by Beck called “Just One of the Guys.” The song is getting some attention for its video, which features Lewis singing alongside gal pals including Anne Hathaway and Kristen Stewart, but you don’t need the visuals to lock into the hypnotic allure of the melody.”

  2. jenny lewis

    voyager

    music review

    ken tucker

  1. Posted on 28 July, 2014

    1,062 notes | Permalink

    Reblogged from smithsonianmag

    smithsonianmag:

Photo of the Day: Nevada Impala
Photo by Beverly Houwing (Beverly Hills, CA, USA); Rhyolite, NV, USA
View in High-Res

    smithsonianmag:

    Photo of the Day: Nevada Impala

    Photo by Beverly Houwing (Beverly Hills, CA, USA); Rhyolite, NV, USA

  2. smithsonian

    photography

    stars

    impala

  1. George Takei became famous for his role in Star Trek as Mr. Sulu, but in the last decade, he’s drawn followers who admire him because of who he is—not just who he has played. The new documentary about his life is called To Be Takei.
He joins Fresh Air to talk about growing up in a Japanese internment camp, avoiding stereotypical roles, and coming out as gay at 68. 
Here he explains why he was closeted for most of his life: 

The thing that affected me in the early part of my career was … there was a very popular box office movie star — blonde, good-looking, good actor — named Tab Hunter. He was in almost every other movie that came out. He was stunningly good-looking and all-American in looks. And then one of the scandals sheets of that time — sort of like The Inquirertoday — exposed him as gay. And suddenly and abruptly, his career came to a stop.That was, to me, chilling and stunning. I was a young no-name actor, aspiring to build this career — and I knew that [if] it were known that I was gay, then there would be no point to my pursuing that career. I desperately and passionately wanted a career as an actor, so I chose to be in the closet. I lived a double life. And that means you always have your guard up. And it’s a very, very difficult and challenging way to live a life.

Photo by Kevin Scanlon via LA Weekly  View in High-Res

    George Takei became famous for his role in Star Trek as Mr. Sulu, but in the last decade, he’s drawn followers who admire him because of who he is—not just who he has played. The new documentary about his life is called To Be Takei.

    He joins Fresh Air to talk about growing up in a Japanese internment camp, avoiding stereotypical roles, and coming out as gay at 68. 

    Here he explains why he was closeted for most of his life: 

    The thing that affected me in the early part of my career was … there was a very popular box office movie star — blonde, good-looking, good actor — named Tab Hunter. He was in almost every other movie that came out. He was stunningly good-looking and all-American in looks. And then one of the scandals sheets of that time — sort of like The Inquirertoday — exposed him as gay. And suddenly and abruptly, his career came to a stop.

    That was, to me, chilling and stunning. I was a young no-name actor, aspiring to build this career — and I knew that [if] it were known that I was gay, then there would be no point to my pursuing that career. I desperately and passionately wanted a career as an actor, so I chose to be in the closet. I lived a double life. And that means you always have your guard up. And it’s a very, very difficult and challenging way to live a life.

    Photo by Kevin Scanlon via LA Weekly 

  2. george takei

    to be takei

    star trek

    lgbt

    hollywood

    fresh air

    terry gross

    interview

  1. Railroad tracks turn into canvases. Via Lost at E Minor View in High-Res

    Railroad tracks turn into canvases. Via Lost at E Minor

  2. train

    art

    music

  1. Project Runway’s Tim Gunn spoke to Terry Gross about being gay in the ’60s and ’70s vs. being gay today: 

"[In] the late 1960s going into the early ’70s, [being gay] was considered to be something you ‘fixed.’ This was an adolescent psychiatric hospital, so people were teens into early 20s, and there were some people there who were there to have their gayness ‘fixed.’ So for me, it was like treating a disease — you have to do something about it. … I remember thinking, ‘I have enough issues without adding this to the list.’ I thought, ‘Oh, God, but for the grace of God, there go I.’
On the one hand, I’m not envious of any young person who is going through a struggle with their sexual identity, I’m not envious at all — but on the other hand, there’s so many more and more positive role models these days. When I was kid, who were the gay people? They were the decorators in the Doris Day movies, they’re the fashion designers, they’re flitting about. I mean, I think about Paul Lynde on Bewitched, I mean, he was a caricature. And today, we recognize that every flavor of humanity comes in every possible size, and color, and shape, and we have so much more awareness of the diversity of everyone. Whenever anyone tries to stereotype gay men, it’s like, ‘Wait a minute, there’s just as many who live like slobs!’”


The premiere of season 13 of Project Runway aired last night.  View in High-Res

    Project Runway’s Tim Gunn spoke to Terry Gross about being gay in the ’60s and ’70s vs. being gay today: 

    "[In] the late 1960s going into the early ’70s, [being gay] was considered to be something you ‘fixed.’ This was an adolescent psychiatric hospital, so people were teens into early 20s, and there were some people there who were there to have their gayness ‘fixed.’ So for me, it was like treating a disease — you have to do something about it. … I remember thinking, ‘I have enough issues without adding this to the list.’ I thought, ‘Oh, God, but for the grace of God, there go I.’

    On the one hand, I’m not envious of any young person who is going through a struggle with their sexual identity, I’m not envious at all — but on the other hand, there’s so many more and more positive role models these days. When I was kid, who were the gay people? They were the decorators in the Doris Day movies, they’re the fashion designers, they’re flitting about. I mean, I think about Paul Lynde on Bewitched, I mean, he was a caricature. And today, we recognize that every flavor of humanity comes in every possible size, and color, and shape, and we have so much more awareness of the diversity of everyone. Whenever anyone tries to stereotype gay men, it’s like, ‘Wait a minute, there’s just as many who live like slobs!’”

    The premiere of season 13 of Project Runway aired last night. 

  2. tim gunn

    fashion

    LGBT

    project runway

    fresh air

    interview

  1. David Edelstein reviews A Most Wanted Man, starring the late Philip Seymour Hoffman: 


Part of me wishes that Philip Seymour Hoffman’s final lead performance, in A Most Wanted Man, wasn’t very good. I know that sounds perverse. But if he’d been flailing as an actor at the end, it would make his loss easier to bear from an artistic—if not a human—perspective. The thing is, though, the actor we see in this movie is at his absolute peak. This might even be my favorite Hoffman performance of all, damn it. 


  View in High-Res

    David Edelstein reviews A Most Wanted Man, starring the late Philip Seymour Hoffman:

    Part of me wishes that Philip Seymour Hoffman’s final lead performance, in A Most Wanted Man, wasn’t very good. I know that sounds perverse. But if he’d been flailing as an actor at the end, it would make his loss easier to bear from an artistic—if not a human—perspective. The thing is, though, the actor we see in this movie is at his absolute peak. This might even be my favorite Hoffman performance of all, damn it.

     

  2. philip seymour hoffman

    a most wanted man

    david edelstein

    movie review

    fresh air

  1. Art students turn an electrical tower into a stained glass lighthouse. via TIC View in High-Res

    Art students turn an electrical tower into a stained glass lighthouse. via TIC

  2. stained glass

    art

    tower

    photo

  1. Human Rights Watch researcher Letta Tayler  just got back from Iraq where she documented tales of ISIS (Islamic State of Iraq and Syria) forcing mass expulsions and murders of Christians and ethnic minorities who are told to convert. Tayler explains the recent edict ISIS issued for Christians in the city of Mosul: 

"ISIS issued an edict around mid-July and it said, "You’ve got three choices: convert, pay us a jihad tax, get out of town—and if you don’t do those, you’ll face the sword."
This was, of course, an absolutely chilling message. It was disseminated throughout the city and on the Internet as well, and at that point most of the Christians had already fled Mosul, but the few remaining families, and we’re still talking several hundred, apparently, just packed up and left. Some left with nothing but the clothes on backs, others piled whatever precious possessions they could into their cars and some of them then found at ISIS checkpoints that they were robbed of those few precious possessions that they had hoped to bring out with them. So it has been an absolutely terrifying part of a broader campaign to “cleanse” … Mosul and surrounding areas, of anyone who does not espouse this strict interpretation of Sharia that ISIS espouses.” 

Propaganda image of ISIS via NBC news  View in High-Res

    Human Rights Watch researcher Letta Tayler  just got back from Iraq where she documented tales of ISIS (Islamic State of Iraq and Syria) forcing mass expulsions and murders of Christians and ethnic minorities who are told to convert. Tayler explains the recent edict ISIS issued for Christians in the city of Mosul: 

    "ISIS issued an edict around mid-July and it said, "You’ve got three choices: convert, pay us a jihad tax, get out of town—and if you don’t do those, you’ll face the sword."

    This was, of course, an absolutely chilling message. It was disseminated throughout the city and on the Internet as well, and at that point most of the Christians had already fled Mosul, but the few remaining families, and we’re still talking several hundred, apparently, just packed up and left. Some left with nothing but the clothes on backs, others piled whatever precious possessions they could into their cars and some of them then found at ISIS checkpoints that they were robbed of those few precious possessions that they had hoped to bring out with them. So it has been an absolutely terrifying part of a broader campaign to “cleanse” … Mosul and surrounding areas, of anyone who does not espouse this strict interpretation of Sharia that ISIS espouses.”
     

    Propaganda image of ISIS via NBC news 

  2. ISIS

    iraq

    terrorism

    human rights watch

    letta tayler

    interview

    fresh air